ARISS contact planned February 19, 2013 with school in Greece

The International Space Station

ARISS contact planned February 19, 2013 with school in Greece

An International Space Station school contact has been planned February 19 2013 with participants at 4th Dimotiko Scholeio Chaidariou, Chaidari (near Athens), Greece.             The event is scheduled to begin at approximately 14:06 UTC, which is 16:07 CEWT.

The contact will be a direct operated by J41ISS. Interested parties in Europe are invited to listen to dowlink signals on 145.800 MHz FM. The contact will be conducted in English.

The event will be webcast on several webstreaming servers: http://www.sv1eag.gr/ http://www.justin.tv/sv1eag#r=-rid-&s=em http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RFJbw5NeAc

School presentation:

Our school is located in Chaidari, a suburb in the north-west of Athens.             It was constructed in 1978, but it is now being renovated so as to be more energy efficient. It is a two-storey building with 16 classrooms, a Head office and a staff room. Continue reading

Next ISS School contact -St Anthony's Parish Primary School, Australia

Space station
Space station

 

03 April at 08:15 UTC

St Anthony’s Parish Primary School, Canberra, Australia - Dan Burbank, KC5ZSX

Telebridge station VK5ZAI in Australia will call NA1SS at approximately 08:15 UTC.

 

St Anthony’s School is located in the suburb of Wanniassa, which is part of the central region of the Tuggeranong Valley in the Australian Capital Territory. Currently the school has an enrolment of 528 students with generally three classes in each of 7 Year levels from Kindergarten (the first year of primary school in the ACT) to Year 6. Our average class size is 1 teacher to 26 students. We have a strong Integrated Unit of Inquiry programs that primarily focus on authentic experiences that the ARISS program would facilitate.

 

Students will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:
1. What is the most interesting thing you have ever seen out of the Space Station window?
2. What do you love most about outer space and miss about home?
3. What are the challenges you face in zero gravity?
4. If someone is injured, what do you do?
5. What is your job in outer space?
6. Is there enough light in space or do you need to use special glasses?
7. I live really close to Tidbinbilla Space Tracking Station. Is Tidbinbilla involved with this mission?
8. How long can you stay in space before it effects your health?
9. I know you can see the Great Wall of China, but can you see any other interesting landmarks on Earth?
10. What do you do in space to entertain yourself?

As always, the ISS will be audible to anyone listening in on the 145.80 MHz downlink.

*Note* – for telebridge contacts, the ground station will NOT be near the school that is contacting the ISS.

Please note, the amateur equipment on the ISS will be turned off prior to the beginning of the contact. It will be returned to service as quickly as possible.

 ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESACNESJAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries. ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS programme is available on the website http://www.rac.ca/ariss (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada). Information about the next scheduled ARISS contact can be found at http://www.rac.ca/ariss/upcoming.htm#NextContact.


Tuesday, April 3, 2012

Next ISS School contact -St Anthony’s Parish Primary School, Australia

Space station
Space station

 

03 April at 08:15 UTC

St Anthony’s Parish Primary School, Canberra, Australia - Dan Burbank, KC5ZSX

Telebridge station VK5ZAI in Australia will call NA1SS at approximately 08:15 UTC.

 

St Anthony’s School is located in the suburb of Wanniassa, which is part of the central region of the Tuggeranong Valley in the Australian Capital Territory. Currently the school has an enrolment of 528 students with generally three classes in each of 7 Year levels from Kindergarten (the first year of primary school in the ACT) to Year 6. Our average class size is 1 teacher to 26 students. We have a strong Integrated Unit of Inquiry programs that primarily focus on authentic experiences that the ARISS program would facilitate.

 

Students will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:
1. What is the most interesting thing you have ever seen out of the Space Station window?
2. What do you love most about outer space and miss about home?
3. What are the challenges you face in zero gravity?
4. If someone is injured, what do you do?
5. What is your job in outer space?
6. Is there enough light in space or do you need to use special glasses?
7. I live really close to Tidbinbilla Space Tracking Station. Is Tidbinbilla involved with this mission?
8. How long can you stay in space before it effects your health?
9. I know you can see the Great Wall of China, but can you see any other interesting landmarks on Earth?
10. What do you do in space to entertain yourself?

As always, the ISS will be audible to anyone listening in on the 145.80 MHz downlink.

*Note* – for telebridge contacts, the ground station will NOT be near the school that is contacting the ISS.

Please note, the amateur equipment on the ISS will be turned off prior to the beginning of the contact. It will be returned to service as quickly as possible.

 ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the participating space agencies, NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESACNESJAXA, and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries. ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning. Further information on the ARISS programme is available on the website http://www.rac.ca/ariss (graciously hosted by the Radio Amateurs of Canada). Information about the next scheduled ARISS contact can be found at http://www.rac.ca/ariss/upcoming.htm#NextContact.


Tuesday, April 3, 2012

ARISS ham radio space contact planned with school in Ortona, Italy

Space station

Space station

An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) school contact has been planned Sunday 18 March 2012 at approximately 11.31 UTC with students at Istituto Tecnologico Statale Trasporti e Logistica “Leone Acciaiuoli”, Ortona, Italy.

The contact will be performed by the radio station IQ6LN and the downlink signal will be audible over Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

The Ortona Maritime Institute “Leone Acciaiuoli” (I.T.N) is a technical high school preparing the students to a career as officer on merchant ships or to university studies in the field of engineering disciplines.
The subjects that characterize the I.T.N. programme are: Navigation, Astronomy, Celestial navigation, Satellite navigation, Telecommunications (including satellite telecommunications), Technical English, Nautical and Aeronautical Meteorology, Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics and Physics. Many courses deal with matters related to space technologies. The student population is about 400.

The event will be broadcast in streaming video onhttp://www.livestream.com/AMSAT_Italia/

Students will ask as many of following questions as time allows.
1. Loris: We all believe you are special people working together to achieve one common great goal. Are you proud of the great moral and scientific value of your commitment?
2. Mauro: What is the relationship among you being forced to live together in a confined place for an extended period of time?
3. Pierluigi: What cultural requirements must an astronaut satisfy besides very hard physical and psychological training?
4. Andrea: Is it easier for astronauts to get used to being weightless or to get used to gravity again when they come back to Earth?
5. Antonio: What height is ISS orbiting at and why was this specific height chosen?

6. Nichol: How is the ISS flight path controlled?
7. Giada: When working outside the ISS how are you protected from the space environment and the risk of flying away?
8. Angela: How long does the voyage back down to the earth take? And how does it take place?
9. Iary: How do you feel when watching the earth from the spacecraft window?
10. Causarano: Do you think living in space might change your perception of the world and influence your future life on earth?

11. Agnese: People say human beings age slower in space than on earth. Is that true?
12. Tamara: How do days and nights alternate up there and how often do you see the sun rising?
13. Francesca: How do you receive news from the earth?
14. Federica: Do you ever happen to miss your ordinary life on earth while being up there?
15. Carmen: What does astronauts’ diet consist in and how is it usually prepared?

16. Giulia: How are water and oxygen generated on board?
17. Mario: What research are you doing and what benefits will result from it?
18. Matteo: We know you are growing plants on board. Why?
19. Alessia: How do you dispose of waste?
20. Francesco: Do you think people will travel to space in the next future?

ARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the space agencies, NASA, Roscosmos, ESA, JAXA and CSA, with the AMSAT and IARU organizations from participating countries.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on-board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

Gaston Bertels, ON4WF
ARISS Chairman