Article on LED Optical Morse Code Spacecraft ShindaiSat

Illustration of high-gain and low-gain LED illumination scenario at the ground station - Image credit Shinshu University

Illustration of high-gain and low-gain LED illumination scenario at the ground station – Image credit Shinshu University

An English language article about ShindaiSat is available at

https://directory.eoportal.org/web/eoportal/satellite-missions/s/shindaisat

ShindaiSatShindaiSat is a 20 kg spacecraft approx 300 by 300 by 350 mm which is planning to use bright LEDs for Space to Earth optical communication using Morse code. It also carries an optical lens system for receiving modulated LED light from the ground station.

There will be an AX.25 packet radio telemetry beacon and a low power CW beacon. Downlink frequencies of 437.305 and 437.485 MHz have been coordinated by the IARU Amateur Satellite Frequency Coordination Panel.

The article says “A launch of ShindaiSat as a secondary payload is manifested for mid-2014 on the primary GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement) mission of NASA and JAXA. JAXA is providing the launch on the H2A vehicle from the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan.

Orbit: Non-sun-synchronous circular orbit, altitude = 407 km, inclination = 65º.”

ShindaiSat website in Google English

F-1 CubeSat Delivered to Tsukuba Space Center

CubeSats ready for HTV-3 Launch – Image Credit Koumei Shibata

The amateur radio CubeSat F-1 built by students at the FPT University in Hanoi, Vietnam has now been delivered to the Tsukuba Space Center in Japan.

F-1 CubeSat – Image Credit Koumei Shibata

F-1 and the other four CubeSats  (RAIKO, WE WISH, FITSAT-1 and TechEdSat) will be integrated with the small satellite deployer J-SSOD before leaving for Tanegashima launch pad.

The CubeSats should be launched to the International Space Station (ISS) on July 21 in the HTV-3 cargo vessel.  It is planned that they will be deployed from the ISS in September by Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide KE5DNI using the Kibo robot arm.

F-1 carries a low-resolution camera (640×480), a 3-axis magnetometer and two Yaesu VX-3R transceivers using 145.980 and 437.485 MHz.

See the story on the FPT University website http://tinyurl.com/FTP-F-1-To-Launch

Further pictures of the CubeSats by Koumei Shibata can be seen at http://fspace.edu.vn/?p=633

An NHK TV News video showing the CubeSats shows the LED’s on FITSAT-1 that will be used to flash Morse Code from space. See http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20120625/t10013095191000.html

For the latest news on F-1 see the FSpace website http://fspace.edu.vn/

Video depicting F-1 CubeSat XV1VN deployment from the ISS http://www.uk.amsat.org/?p=8446

Vietnam Student CubeSat F-1 http://www.uk.amsat.org/?p=5025

F-1 CubeSat is scheduled for launch in July, 2012

Latest update on F-1 CubeSat project:

At the moment, the flight safety review is coming to an end. The FSpace team together with their partner NanoRacks LLC has satisfied the technical requirements and standards set by the launch vehicle provider.

If everything goes according to plan, the F-1 CubeSat will be delivered to Japan by the end of June. Then along with four other CubeSats (RAIKO, WE-WISH, FITSAT-1 and TechEdSatF-1 will be loaded onboard HTV-3 “Kounotori” transfer vehicle for integration with the JAXA HII-B launch vehicle.

F-1 plans to launch to the International Space Station (ISS) on July 21 from Tanegashima, Japan, then in September the Japanese astronaut and radio amateur Akihiko Hoshide KE5DNI should deploy it into space from the ISS using the Kibo robot arm.

It carries two Yaesu VX-3R transceivers using 145.980 and 437.485 MHz.

The FSpace team are offering the public a chance to send their name/callsign and a message into space onboard the F-1 CubeSat. You will also be presented with a certificate! See this link http://fspace.edu.vn/?page_id=31

JAXA http://iss.jaxa.jp/kibo/about/jssod/ Google English http://tinyurl.com/7x79o6p

FSpace http://fspace.edu.vn/

Vietnam Student CubeSat F-1 http://www.uk.amsat.org/5025

Video of HTV-3 “Kounotori” and CubeSat Deployer http://www.uk.amsat.org/8078

F-1 CubeSat Students

JAXA’s SDS-4: End of Critical Phase Completed

imageThe Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce that the Small Demonstration Satellite-4 (SDS-4) completed its critical phase operations and moved to the initial phase. The SDS-4 was launched by the H-IIA F21 at 1:39 a.m. on May 18, 2012 (Japan Standard Time) as a secondary payload with the Global Change Observation Satellite 1st – Water “SHIZUKU” (GCOM-1.)

The satellite is currently in good health.

The initial functional verification operations will continue for about one month.

For the satellite condition, please refer to the following website.
http://www.ard.jaxa.jp/research/jissyou/sds4/sds4-index.html

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JAXA's SDS-4: End of Critical Phase Completed

imageThe Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce that the Small Demonstration Satellite-4 (SDS-4) completed its critical phase operations and moved to the initial phase. The SDS-4 was launched by the H-IIA F21 at 1:39 a.m. on May 18, 2012 (Japan Standard Time) as a secondary payload with the Global Change Observation Satellite 1st – Water “SHIZUKU” (GCOM-1.)

The satellite is currently in good health.

The initial functional verification operations will continue for about one month.

For the satellite condition, please refer to the following website.
http://www.ard.jaxa.jp/research/jissyou/sds4/sds4-index.html

Please follow SpaceRef on Twitter and Like us on Facebook.

50 percent more satellites to be launched in the decade ahead

by Staff Writers
Paris, France (SPX) Sep 05, 2011


Civilian government agencies are expected to procure more satellites for operational missions in Earth observation, meteorology, navigation, and communications. In most countries, communications satellites (comsat) are now primarily acquired by private companies for commercial services, but several governments continue to fund comsat technology development domestically to ensure they have cost-effective systems when needed.

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