Amateur radio satellites launched from India November 29

Reaktor Team's Quasars and CubeSats Scientist Sissi Enestam

Reaktor Team’s Quasars and CubeSats Scientist Sissi Enestam

Satellites with Amateur Radio payloads launched from India on the ISRO PSLV-C43 mission at 0427 GMT on Thursday, November 29, 2018.

Among the satellites is the Reaktor Hello World CubeSat, callsign OH2RHW, carrying a Packet Radio Digipeater. The 437.775 MHz beacon transmitter was expected to be activated and start sending Morse code at around 1100 GMT on Thursday. The team had said the first person to record and report the beacon gets an RHW mission T-shirt.

Reaktor Hello World RF specification and TLE are available at https://reaktorspace.com/reaktor-hello-world/

The Morse code (CW) transmission from Reaktor Hello World was received and tweeted by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW in Japan at 1150 GMT.

In response to JA0CAW’s tweet the Reaktor team responded with WOOOHOOOO!!!!

Reception of Reaktor Hello World by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW

Reception of Reaktor Hello World by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW

Talking to the Times of India, ISRO chair Kailasavadivoo Sivan said, “We are going to to launch HySIS at 9.59 am [IST] on November 29 from Sriharikota. Over 30 foreign satellites, including nano and mini satellites, will also be launched along with the main payload. Out of the 30 commercial satellites, 23 are from the US.”
https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/isro-to-launch-hyperspectral-imaging-sat-with-30-foreign-satellites-on-nov-29/articleshow/66801810.cms

The satellites with amateur radio payloads, all CubeSats, are:

3CAT1 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=370

FacSat-1 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=635

InnoSat-2 http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=548

Reaktor Hello World https://twitter.com/RHW_Satellite/
https://reaktorspace.com/reaktor-hello-world/
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=503

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination http://amsat.org.uk/iaru

FCC rejects AMSAT Orbital Debris Petition

FCC SealARRL reports the FCC has rejected a Petition for Reconsideration that AMSAT filed 14 years ago, seeking to exempt Amateur Radio satellites from the FCC’s satellite orbital debris mitigation requirements.

The ARRL story says:

The Commission took the opportunity in a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Order on Reconsideration, released on November 19, that revisits its orbital debris rules for the first time since their adoption in 2004. Among other things, AMSAT had argued at the time of its Petition that applying the orbital debris requirements to Amateur Radio satellites would be cost prohibitive, and that the FCC had not indicated what constitutes an acceptable orbital debris mitigation plan.

Acknowledging that time has made some of AMSAT’s arguments moot, the FCC said the costs involved with modifications to comply with post-mission disposal requirements “are justified when balanced against the public interest in mitigating orbital debris.” The FCC said it determined that closer adherence to the disposal methods described in the rules was “warranted in order to limit the growth of orbital debris” in low-Earth orbit (LEO).

“In any event, in the years since the debris mitigation rules were adopted, and notwithstanding any costs imposed by FCC regulations, well over 150 small satellites have been authorized, with at least 20 of those considered amateur satellites,” the FCC said in its November 15 Order on Reconsideration. “It appears that, to the extent that any costs have been incurred, the main contributor to costs for amateur and similar LEO missions has to do with the availability of launches to appropriate orbits.”

The FCC also said that in the years since the FCC issued its Orbital Debris Order, “numerous licensees, including amateur satellites operating in LEO, have successfully satisfied our orbital debris mitigation requirements.

FCC Notice of Proposed Rulemaking and Order on Reconsideration
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-18-159A1.pdf

2004 AMSAT Petition for Reconsideration
https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/6516493220.pdf

2004 FCC Second Report and Order IB Docket No. 02-54
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-04-130A1.pdf

Source ARRL http://www.arrl.org/news/fcc-rejects-2004-amsat-petition-to-reconsider-applying-orbital-debris-rules-to-ham-satellites

Happy 5th Birthday FUNcube-1

First signals received from FUNcube-1

First signals received from FUNcube-1

Five years ago, on November 21, 2013, FUNcube-1 launched into space. Soon, we hope to welcome ESEO (FUNcube-4) and JY1SAT (FUNcube-6) into space. A remarkable achievement by the radio amateur volunteers of AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NL.

Happy Birthday FUNcube-1.

In 2010, we got the first prototypes working and got zero packet errors when testing the downlink chain!

In 2012, we were assembling the flight model in the ISISpace clean room. ISISpace has been the satellite integrator for this mission and continues to partner with AMSAT-UK on multiple missions.

Another big milestone straight after assembly of the spacecraft: the antenna deployment test! During this test, we pretend the satellite is in space for the first time, and check that it successfully starts up and starts transmitting to the world.

After the deployment testing, the antennas need to be stowed again, and then we arm the satellite for launch and place it in its deployment canister together with our fellow passengers HiNCube and ZACUBE-1. In this case the ISISpace ISIPOD was used.

Next up: transport to the launch base, fitting to the rocket, and LAUNCH! FUNcube was launched 21 November 2013 at 07:10 UTC on a Dnepr rocket from Yasny Launch Base. Thanks ISILaunch for taking us up on ISILaunch03.

Since then, we have had FUNcube systems in UKube-1, QB50p1, Nayif-1 and the upcoming ESEO and JY1SAT spacecraft, bringing the total FUNcube payloads launched for STEM education and amateur radio to six.

In 5 years, FUNcube has transmitted for 157,766,400 seconds, with a 256kB frame every 5 seconds, equating to approx 7.5GB of data. Our ground network has recovered 1.7GB. On average, we see 105 daily listeners, receiving 3688 frames per day. At minimum, we still had 40 listeners.

Users receiving FUNcube-1 telemetry and uploading to Data Warehouse

Users receiving FUNcube-1 telemetry and uploading to Data Warehouse

We were very conservative with our power budget. The battery is almost always full, and quickly charges up after eclipse. The solar panel current Ipv does not show significant degradation. the ISI Space solar panels and GOMspace EPS are doing a wonderful job.

FUNcube-1 Solar Flux versus Power Generation

FUNcube-1 Solar Flux versus Power Generation

On board temperatures have been at maximum 43.2°C, and at minimum -26.7°C, disregarding some outliers caused by the satellite rebooting. We have had two periods of continuous illumination, which can be seen by the temperature rises.

FUNcube-1 Temperature

FUNcube-1 Temperature

Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG

FUNcube-1 (AO-73) information https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/funcube-1/

ESEO launch information and Dashboard

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

The launch of the ESEO spacecraft on board the SSO-A flight from Vandenberg is scheduled for 18:31:47 GMT on Monday, December 3.

The ESEO microsatellite includes a FUNcube payload which will provide similar telemetry to its predecessors but will have a more powerful transmitter and thus be even easier to hear. For amateurs, this payload will also provide a single channel L/V transponder for FM. These downlinks will be transmitted on 145.895 MHz and the FM transponder uplink will be on 1263.5 MHz with a 67 Hz PLL tone required.

A new Dashboard has been developed for this mission and is available for download ESEO Dashboard ver 1177

The AMSAT FUNcube Payload Downlink Data document gives all the information required to decode the telemetry ESEO_Downlink_Data_1_21a

The new Dashboard will operate in exactly the same manner as those developed for previous missions and general set-up information can be downloaded here: Dashboard Guidance

A new Data Warehouse has also been created. This can be used to view the telemetry from ALL of the FUNcube missions: http://data.amsat-uk.org/

We expect that the FUNcube telemetry transmitter will become operational after the launch and subsequent to the completion of initial de-tumbling of the spacecraft.

Thanks for your valuable support for this mission!

More information on ESEO is available from ESA Education’s website
https://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO

Information on other SSO-A spacecraft with amateur radio payloads
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

ESEO ready for launch

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESA have released a video of the European Student Earth Orbiter ESEO satellite which carries an amateur radio payload.

ESEO is expected to launch as part of Spaceflight’s SSO-A SmallSat Express mission, on a SpaceX Falcon 9 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, currently scheduled for Wednesday, November 28 at 18:32 GMT.

Watch the launch live at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJkRM5QQDAA

The AMSAT payload, provided by AMSAT-UK in cooperation with the University of Surrey, UK, allows the satellite to establish a downlink connection to hundreds of ground stations in the AMSAT network, sending both housekeeping and scientific data. These data will be used to run science and technology lessons in schools and universities.

Radio amateurs will be able to communicate via the 1260/145 MHz FM transponder.

IARU Coordinated Frequencies:
• Main ESEO Telemetry Beacon 437.000 MHz 4k8 or 9k6 GMSK AX25
• FUNcube-4 Beacon 145.895 MHz 4k8 BPSK
• FM Uplink 1263.500 MHz CTCSS 67 Hz
• FM Downlink 145.895 MHz

Watch European Student Earth Orbiter ready for launch

ESEO https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/eseo/

Satellites with Amateur Radio payloads on the SSO-A mission
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/14/ssoa-amateur-radio-satellites/

Es’hail-2 / P4-A positioning and IOT phase started

Es'hail-2 Mission Patch

Es’hail-2 Mission Patch

Following the successful launch on November 15 of Es’hail-2 on board the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle, Mitsubishi (MELCO) and Es’hailSat will begin the In Orbit Testing (IOT) program once the satellite has been positioned in a test orbital slot – the positioning should be achieved in the next few days.

The IOT phase will take a few months, during which time the amateur radio payload will not be turned on.

AMSAT-DL will be commissioning the Amateur transponder ground station in Doha with the Es’hailSat control team.

Once IOT is complete, the satellite will be moved to the final orbital slot at 26 degrees and there will be an announcement by AMSAT-DL when the transponders are available for use.

Before this announcement, no attempt should be made to use the transponders as any interference to the test program will delay the release and if excessive interference is seen may cause the satellite owners not to make the facility available for amateur use.

Source AMSAT-DL
https://amsat-dl.org/p4a-positionining-and-iot
https://twitter.com/amsatdl

Es’hail-2 geostationary satellite information including video of a presentation on the transponders
https://amsat-uk.org/2018/11/05/eshail-2-geostationary-transponders/

Es’hail-2 information https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geosynchronous/eshail-2/

Coming soon Es’hail-2 WebSDR https://eshail.batc.org.uk/