Kenilworth students’ amateur radio contact with space station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

This is the high definition video feed from the live contact between the Kenilworth School and Sixth Form GB4KSN and astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT onboard the International Space Station NA1SS on Friday, December 14, 2018.

The event starts with a brief introduction from the head teacher, Mr Hayden Abbott, before the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact.

ARISS Operations UK team lead takes over at approximately 12 minutes and leads the audience into the contact which occurs at approximately 58:05 minutes into the video.

Watch the video of the event

Kenilworth school ARISS contact
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2018/december/ariss-event-1412.htm

ARISS http://www.ariss-eu.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, Warwickshire

Dr Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Dr. Serena M. Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

The event is scheduled Friday, December 14, 2018 at approximately 1255 GMT with live streaming starting from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM and can be received on your phone or tablet via the Farnham WebSDR

School Information:

Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year’s GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood – Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

GB4KSN antenna mast

GB4KSN antenna mast

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that “space” smells very metallic. Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station. What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you’re moving when you’re on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What’s your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAbout ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/ 

73, Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

How to hear the ISS, with an amateur radio transceiver, scanner or by listening online on your phone or tablet via a WebSDR https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

The event will be streamed live from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

ARISS Joins NASA On-The-Air for a Special SSTV Event

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) is planning a very special Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event from about 1000 UT Saturday, Oct. 27 until 1930 UT Monday, Oct. 29 on 145.800 MHz FM using PD-120.

UPDATE 0930 GMT Oct. 28: SSTV pictures were sent from the ISS on Saturday, the session ended early in the afternoon. Transmissions resumed early Sunday morning.

Helping to support the event will be NASA’s Space, Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Department.

The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program manages NASA’s three most important communications networks: The Space Network (SN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Deep Space Network (DSN).

Just as in past ARISS SSTV commemorations, twelve images will be downlinked, but this time with six featuring the SCaN educational activities while the other six images will commemorate major NASA anniversaries, ie., when NASA was established, astronauts first landing on the moon, etc.

In addition to the fun of receiving these images, participants can qualify for a special endorsement for the NASA On The Air (NOTA) celebration event. To learn more about NOTA visit https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/

Once received, images can be posted and viewed at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

The transmissions are expected to be broadcast at the usual frequency of 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

Source AMSAT News Service

Note the ISS transmissions use the 5 kHz deviation FM standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try using the wider filter. Handheld transceivers generally have a single wide filter fitted as standard and you should get good results outdoors using just a 1/4 wave whip antenna.

ISS SSTV links for tracking and decoding Apps
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

You can receive the SSTV transmissions by using an Online Radio (WebSDR) and the MMSSTV software:
• Listen to the ISS when it is in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
• Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

ISS Fan Club – Tracking / Predictions http://www.issfanclub.com/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

SSTV from Space for JOTA and Space Station Active

Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT, who is currently on the International Space Station, was active on 145.800 MHz FM making contacts on Saturday, October 20 using the callsign NA1SS.
Watch a video at
twitter.com/supercazzola/status/1053659932292247552

The ISS packet radio digipeater on 145.825 MHz was active during Jamboree On The Air (JOTA) and Lauren 2E0HLR took advantage of this to demonstrate the reception of APRS packets from the Space Station to Scouts, see twitter.com/G0PEKand2E0HLR

Adil Namakoe YD3HNL has released a video of the Slow Scan TV pictures he received during Jamboree On The Air from the amateur radio satellite IO-86.

Watch IO-86 SSTV MODE #JOTA PASS 20102018

Adil Namakoe YD3HNL
https://twitter.com/adilnamakoe/
https://www.facebook.com/adil.namakoe

Four Russian satellites to be deployed during ISS spacewalk

SiriusSat-1 RS13S and SiriusSat-2 RS14S CubeSats

SiriusSat-1 (RS13S) and SiriusSat-2 (RS14S) CubeSats

Four Russian satellites with amateur radio payloads are expected be deployed from the International Space Station on Wednesday, August 15 during a spacewalk (EVA-45) by Sergei Prokopiev and Oleg Artemiev.

SiriusSat-1 (SXC1-181) RS13S beacon 435.570 MHz
(signal reported Aug 15 https://network.satnogs.org/observations/?norad=99970)
SiriusSat-2 (SXC1-182) RS14S beacon 435.670 MHz
(signal reported Aug 15 https://network.satnogs.org/observations/?norad=99971)

Tanyusha SWSU №3 RS-8 beacon 437.050 MHz 9k6 FSK or FM voice
(signal reported Aug 15 https://network.satnogs.org/observations/?norad=99974)
Tanyusha SWSU №4 RS-9 beacon 437.050 MHz 9k6 FSK or FM voice
(signal reported Aug 15 https://network.satnogs.org/observations/?norad=99973)

The Tanyushka SWSU CubeSats are also referred to as Tanyusha-YuZGU or Tanusha. The Cryillic spelling is Танюша-ЮЗГУ.

Was ТNS-0 №3 (Technologicesky Nanosputnik) deployed along with the four CubeSats?

Watch Reception of Tanyusha-3 RS-8 by the Chertsey Radio Club

Chertsey Radio Club
https://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.com/2018/08/tanusha-3-satellite.html
https://twitter.com/chertseyRC

BIRDS-2 CubeSats to deploy from ISS August 10

BIRDS CubeSat Project LogoMasa JN1GKZ reports JAXA has announced three BIRDS-2 CubeSats with APRS digipeaters will deploy from the International Space Station at about 0945 GMT on August 10, 2018.

BHUTAN-1, MAYA-1 and UiTMSat-1 will transmit 30 minutes after deployment. Initial mode looks CW on 70cm.

They use same frequency 437.375 MHz and transmit in the order of BHUTAN-1, MAYA-1 and UiTMSat-1. Each CubeSat also has an APRS digipeater on 145.825 MHz.

Watch BIRDS-2 deployment live broadcast at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwS5uE5RStw

Satellite      Country      ID             Call Sign
BHUTAN-1  Bhutan       BIRD-BT   JG6YKL
MAYA-1      Philippines  BIRD-PH  JG6YKM
UiTMSat-1  Malaysia     BIRD-MY  JG6YKN

The live broadcast will open on 0915-1010z August 10. Deployment will be done around 0945z.

Initial operation plan is announced as following.
T=0  deployment form ISS
T+30  V/U antenna deployment
T+32  437.375MHz CW beacon start transmitting

So, CW beacon will start 1017z. The location is over Central Asia. Satellites go towards the east and pass through China, Japan, Pacific Ocean, South America, Africa and Europe. Check the orbit with ISS keps.

BIRDS Project http://birds2.birds-project.com/operation/