Slow Scan TV from Space Dec 5-6

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

The 145.800 MHz FM Slow Scan Television (SSTV) transmissions from the International Space Station on December 5-6 should be receivable by radio amateurs around the world.

There should also be SSTV activity on December 7 and 8 at times when the ISS is in range of Moscow.

UPDATE: On Dec 5 ISS Ham @RF2Space Tweeted:
Looks like the #ISS #SSTV test activity was delayed a day. The MAI-75 part is still there but some time changes and session removed. See new schedule at https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

The MAI-75 SSTV system in the Russian Service Module will be put through some extended testing from December 5 starting around 15:00 UTC and running until 09:00 UTC on December 6. Test images will be used during this period. This will provide near global coverage if all works well on 145.800 MHz FM.

In the past images have been sent using the SSTV mode PD120, with a 2-minute off time between each image.

All you need to receive SSTV pictures direct from the space station is to connect the audio output of a scanner or amateur radio transceiver via a simple interface to the soundcard on a Windows PC or an Apple iOS device, and tune in to 145.800 MHz FM. You can even receive pictures by holding an iPhone next to the radio loudspeaker.

The ISS puts out a strong signal on 145.800 MHz FM and a 2m handheld with a 1/4 wave antenna should be enough to receive it.

Many FM rigs can be switched been wide and narrow deviation FM filters. For best results you should select the filter for wider 5 kHz deviation FM. Handhelds all seem to have a single wide filter fitted as standard.

ARISS SSTV Blog http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.co.uk/

ISS Slow Scan TV information with links to Apps and ISS tracking
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

New ham radio equipment for ISS

ARISS 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 - Credit John Brier KG4AKV

ARISS 25 watt JVC-Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 – Credit John Brier KG4AKV

The ARISS website reports on progress towards flying new amateur radio equipment to the International Space Station.

On behalf of the ARISS International team, I am proud to announce that on Friday September 29th the ARISS team submitted the InterOperable Radio System (IORS) Safety Data Package to NASA for review!  Our next step in this process is the Safety Review, which is planned for November 2.

Submitting this was a phenomenal accomplishment!!  Particularly since the entire Safety Data Package was developed exclusively by our ARISS volunteers—something we have never done before.  Prior to this submittal, all safety packages—from Owen Garriott’s in the early 1980s to today–were developed with contractors from NASA, ESA or Energia.  And might I say at substantial expense.  I am pleased that the ARISS team did it ourselves!

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

Why is this important?  Two reasons:

1) This is a very major IORS milestone. We cannot get to orbit without successfully completing the safety review process and getting our hardware certified for flight.
2) Developing the safety package exclusively with volunteers is an innovative and gutsy approach to keep costs down and get the hardware flown sooner.  Otherwise we probably would have to slip launch 1-2 years while we acquired additional funding to get this done.

NASA Human Spaceflight Safety Certification is a four-step process—Phase 0, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.  The material we submitted covers the first three of the four phases.  As part of Phases 0, 1 and 2, we need to make sure NASA understands our design.  And we need to show NASA that we understand all the potential hazards that our hardware systems could introduce to ISS and how we have mitigated (or prevented) these hazards.  One example is to demonstrate to NASA that our IORS was designed with electrical wiring and circuit breakers that possess adequate features and sufficient margin to prevent an electrical shock or fire on-board the ISS.  Critically important stuff!  The final phase (Phase 3) will be complete when we have completed all testing and NASA inspection of our flight hardware and NASA deems it flight worthy.  At that point the IORS will be flight certificated and we can fly!  Currently we are looking to March-May 2018 for flight readiness.

For those not following ARISS hardware development very closely, we are developing the IORS to replace most of the on-board radio hardware. It is called “interoperable” because it is being designed to be operated anywhere on ISS.  But specifically, it will be used in the two areas with ISS Ham legacy antennas: the Columbus Module and the Russian Service Module. Interoperability allows us to leverage existing ISS power cables, it can be moved between modules in the event of on-orbit failures, and it supports common training and operations.

Multi-Voltage Power Supply with JVC-Kenwood D710GA on mounting bracket

The IORS is the most complex in-cabin hardware system we have ever designed, built, tested and flown as a volunteer team. We will remove the 3 watt Ericsson handheld radio system, initially certified for flight in 1999, and the Packet module–both of which have recently had issues—and install a brand-new, specially modified 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA radio to enable a multitude of new or improved capabilities on ISS, including voice repeater and better APRS operations.  A key development is the Multi-Voltage Power Supply (MVPS), which interfaces with multiple electric outlet connection types on ISS and provides a multitude of power output capabilities for our current and future ARISS operations and amateur radio experimentation.  It will also allow our Ham Video system to have a dedicated power outlet, eliminating the outlet sharing we have now, which shuts down Ham Video at times.

This effort would not be possible without the dedication and persistence of our IORS development team of volunteers.  They have been working tirelessly behind the scenes to provide an outstanding amateur radio experience for all.  Our IORS development team includes: Lou McFadin, W5DID, our Chief Engineer; Kerry Banke, N6IZW, the MVPS lead designer; Bob Davis, KF4KSS, the MVPS Mechanical enclosure designer; Ed Krome, K9EK, supporting IORS thermal control and cabin noise dissipation; Dave Taylor, W8AAS, our JVC Kenwood D-710 development liaison; Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, our APRS and D-710 operations expert; Shin Aota, JL1IBD, and Phil Parton, N4DRO for all their phenomenal support from JVC Kenwood; Kenneth Ransom, N5VHO, our operations lead; and our safety package team—Ken Ernandes, N2WWD, and Gordon Scannell, KD8COJ.  Kudos to all on a fantastic effort!

Designing, building and testing the IORS is a huge undertaking and *very* expensive.  We need to build ten (10!) units to support flight hardware, flight spares, testing, and training across the international team.  Hardware parts, development tools, fabrication, testing, and expenses to certify the IORS are expected to cost approximately $150,000.  And the hard part (i.e. most expensive part) is just now starting.  So please consider making a donation to ARISS to take our hardware system from dream to reality.  You can donate to ARISS directly through the AMSAT web site at:  http://www.ariss.org/donate.html.  ALL donations go directly to ARISS.

Thank you for all your support to inspire, engage and educate our youth to consider wireless communications and amateur radio, and to pursue STEAM careers through our exciting human space exploration and amateur radio endeavor!

Ad Astra!  To the Stars!

Sincerely,
Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair and ISS Ham Radio Principal Investigator

Source http://ariss.org/

Russian Cosmonauts Deploy Satellites

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanyusha-SWSU 1 and 2 CubeSats

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanyusha-SWSU 1 and 2 CubeSats

On Thursday, July 17, 2017 ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, RN3FI and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy manually deployed 5 satellites during a spacewalk.

The satellites were deployed from the Pirs airlock module of the International Space Station.

Jonathan McDowell‏ @planet4589 Tweeted this information on the deployment times:
1510 UTC Tomsk-TPU-120
1515 UTC Tanyusha-SWSU 1
1516 UTC Tanyusha-SWSU 2
1521 UTC TNS-0 No. 2
1529 UTC TS-530-Zerkalo (sphere)

Three of the satellites carry amateur radio payloads, Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 on 437.050 MHz with either 9k6 FSK or FM voice announcements and Tomsk-TPU-120 on 437.025 MHz with FM voice announcements.

Tomsk-TPU-120
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/29/tomsk-tpu-120-eva-deployment/
Check for reports at http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=325

Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 also known as Radioskaf 6 & 7 (RS6S, RS7S)
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/06/30/russian-tanusha-1-and-2-satellites/
Check for reports at http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?cat=445

Amateur radio satellite deployment during Russian spacewalk

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanusha-SWSU-1

ISS Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin RN3FI with Tanusha-SWSU-1

Two Russian cosmonauts will venture outside the International Space Station Thursday, Aug. 17, to deploy several nanosatellites, collect research samples and perform structural maintenance.

Coverage of the spacewalk will begin at 10 a.m. EDT (1400 GMT, 3pm BST) on NASA Television and the agency’s website https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive

Expedition 52 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin, RN3FI and Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy, of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will don their spacesuits and exit the station’s Pirs airlock at approximately 10:45 a.m.

Ryazanskiy will begin the schedule of extravehicular activities with the manual deployment of five nanosatellites from a ladder outside the airlock. The satellites, each of which has a mass of about 11 pounds, have a variety of purposes.
[the satellites are thought to include Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 and Tomsk-TPU-120]

One of the satellites, with casings made using 3-D printing technology, will test the effect of the low-Earth-orbit environment on the composition of 3-D printed materials. Another satellite contains recorded greetings to the people of Earth in 11 languages. A third satellite commemorates the 60th anniversary of the Sputnik 1 launch and the 160th anniversary of the birth of Russian scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky.

The spacewalkers also will collect residue samples from various locations outside the Russian segment of the station and install handrails and struts to facilitate future excursions.

Yurchikhin will be designated extravehicular crew member 1 (EV1) for this spacewalk, the ninth of his career. Ryazanskiy, embarking on his fourth spacewalk, will be extravehicular crew member 2 (EV2). Both will wear Russian Orlan spacesuits bearing blue stripes. The spacewalk will be the 202nd in support of space station assembly and maintenance and the seventh spacewalk this year.

Check out the full NASA TV schedule and video streaming information at:
https://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Get breaking news, images and features from the station on Instagram and Twitter at:
http://instagram.com/iss
and
https://twitter.com/Space_Station we were able to get fast Instagram followers just recently.

Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2 also known as Radioskaf 6 & 7 (RS6S, RS7S)
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/06/30/russian-tanusha-1-and-2-satellites/

Tomsk-TPU-120
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/29/tomsk-tpu-120-eva-deployment/

Three ELaNa CubeSats delivered to Space Station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

NanoRacks reports on a delivery of payloads to the ISS including three CubeSats which are part of NASA’s Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) mission.

Houston, TX – August 16, 2017 – SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft successfully berthed to the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday after their twelfth commercial resupply (CRS) mission launched from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex 39A in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The CRS-12 Dragon carried 32 of NanoRacks’ customer payloads to the ISS.

Notably on this mission was the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (SMDC) and Adcole-Maryland Aerospace’s Kestrel Eye IIM (KE2M) satellite. This satellite is a technology demonstration seeking to validate the concept of using microsatellites in low-Earth orbit to support critical operations. The overall goal is to demonstrate that small satellites are viable platforms for proving critical path support to operations and hosting advanced payloads.

KE2M is the second flagship satellite in NanoRacks’ Kaber Deployment Program. NanoRacks Kaber Deployment Program allows for a larger EXPRESS class of satellites to be deployed from the International Space Station, up to 100 kilograms. NanoRacks deploys these Kaber-class satellites currently through the Japanese Experiment Module Airlock, and will shift deployments to the NanoRacks Airlock Module when the Company’s commercial Airlock becomes operational (planned for 2019).

On this mission are also three satellites that were selected for flight by NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) as part of the twenty second installment of the Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) missions, and sponsored by the NASA Launch Services Program (LSP). These include NASA Jet Propulsion Lab’s (JPL) ASTERIA, Goddard Spaceflight Center’s DELLINGR, and Pennsylvania State University’s OSIRIS-3U. These CubeSats have a target deployment for mid-November.

Additionally, NanoRacks brought 28 DreamUp student experiments to the ISS, which includes the Student Spaceflight Experiments Program Mission 11 (21 MixStix), Israel’s Ramon Foundation (5 MixStix), Cuberider-1, and the Boy Scouts of America (both NanoLab projects).

The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) project, sponsored by the Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), is the first-ever experiment in space by BSA. The scouts of Troop 209, a part of the Pathway to Adventure Council based in Chicago, are seeking to better understand how bacteria functions in space, and why virulence patterns in space differ from those on Earth.

With the completion of the CRS-12 launch, NanoRacks has now brought over 580 payloads to the International Space Station since 2009.

NanoRacks Press Release

Successful ARISS contact with YOTA 2017

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV - Credit UHF Satcom

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV – Credit UHF Satcom

Young radio amateurs at the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event at Gilwell Park made contact with astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on the International Space Station.

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

The first session took place when the ISS came above the horizon at 18:37 GMT (7:37 pm BST) on Tuesday, August 8. The HamTV Digital Amateur Television pictures on 2395 MHz were successfully received and participants were able to see Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA floating in the Columbus module of the ISS. Paolo, operating with the call sign NA1SS, was able to receive the transmission from the YOTA station GB4YOTA but there seemed to be an issue with the 145.800 MHz Ericsson transceiver on the ISS and Paolo’s voice transmissions could not be heard.

The second session took place during the next orbital pass at 20:15 GMT (9:15 pm BST). For this session Paolo operated the amateur radio station (Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver) located in the Russian Service Module.

The transmission was heard loud and clear at Gilwell Park and the young radio amateurs were able to ask Paolo their questions.

Watch a short video showing the setting up of the ARISS ground station
and the Space Station contacts

Watch the full length video of the  event. Fast forward to 2:34:00 for the 145.800 MHz FM contact

A list of the questions the YOTA participants asked is at
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/08/03/ariss-contact-yota-2017/

Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Press Release YOTA 2017 Gilwell Park – PDF download here

You can listen to the ISS using an Online Radio. When Voice or Slow Scan TV transmissions are planned select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM. For the more frequent Packet Radio transmissions select a Frequency of 145825.0 kHz and Mode FM.
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia
Check the ISS Fan Club site to see current status and when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/