First family-friendly amateur radio event at The Royal Mint Experience

AO-73 (FUNcube-1) – Image credit Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG

A unique event is taking place at The Royal Mint Experience, The Royal Mint’s new visitor centre in Llantrisant, Wales from July 30 to August 5, 2017. Local school children and members of the public have been invited to “The Royal Mint Radio Experience” to enjoy a fun, informal and interactive workshop.

They’ll have the opportunity to send and receive radio signals with FUNcube-1, an educational satellite launched in 2013 which is used by schools and educational groups all around the world. Visitors will also exchange greeting messages with radio enthusiasts across the world and, as each country is contacted it will be logged on a large map. The target is to contact each of the 100 countries with which the Royal Mint has worked during its 1,000 year history! The national amateur radio societies in many of those countries have contacted us to say that their members are looking forward to greeting the children on air.

In addition, during the sessions each person will be able to learn how to send their name using Morse code and will receive a special certificate to confirm their achievement.

RSGB General Manager Steve Thomas, M1ACB said: “We’re delighted to be supporting this event which will give visitors to the Royal Mint a chance to experience the wonder of amateur radio and satellite communication. Amateur radio has many links with the science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) curriculum and can lead to rewarding careers.”

Members of the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), Barry Amateur Radio Society (BARS) and AMSAT-UK will be running the special amateur radio station whose call sign GB4RME (GB 4 Royal Mint Experience) has been granted by Ofcom just for this event.

RSGB Regional Manager and BARS Chairman Glyn Jones, GW0ANA added: “We believe this is the very first time any amateur radio station has been allowed to operate from a Royal Mint anywhere in the world, so it really is a unique occasion!”

The FUNcube-1 Fitter message transmitted by the satellite says:
“Greetings from space to visitors, staff and team G B 4 R M E . Amateur Radio special event and demonstrations at the Royal Mint Experience South Wales. 30 Jul to 5 Aug.”
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/downloads/fitter.txt

The Royal Mint Experience http://www.royalmint.com/en/the-royal-mint-experience

Barry Amateur Radio Society http://www.bars.btck.co.uk/

FUNcube-1 https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/funcube-1/

Bittern DXers get 10k Lottery Grant

AO-73 (FUNcube-1) – Image credit Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG

The Eastern Daily Press report the Bittern DX Group in North Walsham have been awarded £10,000 by the Big Lottery Fund.

The newspaper story says:

The award will help them continue to introduce people to the world of technology, and the possibilities that radio communication can offer people.

But the news wasn’t only celebrated in North Walsham, or even Norfolk, as the announcement was transmitted from a satellite orbiting the Earth.

The satellite, FunCube1, as built by members of the Amateur Radio community and launched into orbit on 21st November 2013.

It was built with the goal of enthusing and educating young people about radio, space, physics and electronics, and is the first satellite with outreach as its primary mission and demonstrates the depth and breadth of the hobby of Amateur Radio.

The Bittern DXers hope that with their new funds they can continue to work on initiatives such as the Educational Outreach Project which entails the group taking their equipment to public events and teach people about their hobby.

Read the full newspaper story at
http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/message-from-space-celebrates-north-walsham-group-s-stellar-grant-1-5106808

The FUNcube-1 Fitter message transmitted by the satellite said:
“The Bittern DXers are delighted to announce they have received a National Lottery Awards for All grant for their Educational Outreach project bringing amateur radio to the public.”
http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/downloads/fitter.txt

Information on the FUNcube-1 (AO-73) satellite can be found at  https://funcube.org.uk/
and https://amsat-uk.org/funcube/funcube-cubesat/

Bittern DXers https://www.bittern-dxers.org.uk/
https://twitter.com/BitternDXers

Any amateur radio club can apply for a Big Lottery Fund grant, details at https://www.biglotteryfund.org.uk/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Russian Satellites Tanusha 1 and 2 set for Activation

A Tanusha CubeSat

Two Russian satellites are planned to be activated inside the International Space Station (ISS) Russian Segment as part of a verification test from July 4-8.

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The satellites will eventually be deployed by hand from the ISS during a Russian space walk tentatively scheduled for August 17, 2017.

The satellites Tanusha 1 and Tanusha 2 [спутники Тануша 1/2], will be downlinked at 145.800 MHz FM. Transmissions from Tanusha 1 should begin around 18:30 UT on July 4. Transmissions will cease on July 6 from 08:20 till 18:00 UT to allow the satellites to be swapped out. Tanusha 2 will then be activated beginning on July 6 around 18:00 UT and continue until July 8 at 10:30 UT.

The satellites will broadcast greeting messages in Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese. More details will be made available on the Southwest Western State University site at https://www.swsu.ru/

Source ARISS

Greeting messages recorded from Tanusha-1 from inside the ISS
https://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/thersgb-hamradio-amsat-pic.html

Greetings messages from Tanusha-2 from inside the ISS
https://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/greetings-messages-from-tanusha-2-from.html

The satellites are also referred to as Tanyusha-SWSU 1 & 2, or Tanyusha-YuZGU 1 & 2, or Танюша-ЮЗГУ 1 & 2, or Radioskaf 6 & 7 (RS6S, RS7S) http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/tanyusha-yuzgu-1.htm

Tomsk-TPU-120 was launched to the ISS in 2016. It is reportedly very similar to Tanusha-1 and there is a possibility it may be deployed with the Tanusha CubeSats during the Russian spacewalk (EVA) around August 17 https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/29/tomsk-tpu-120-eva-deployment/

Southwest Western State University SWSU in Google English http://tinyurl.com/RussiaSWSU

Listen to the ISS using an Online Radio – Select Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia

How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

IARU Aligns Satellite Coordination Guidelines with ITU WRC-15 Decisions

As the global federation of national associations of radio amateurs in more than 150 countries, the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) for many years has provided frequency coordination services for amateur satellites free of charge.

Often these satellites are constructed by students at universities and other institutions as a part of their educational experience. In general, they have been licensed to operate in the amateur-satellite service, which is defined by the Radio Regulations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) as having the “…purpose of self-training, intercommunication and technical investigations carried out by amateurs, that is, by duly authorized persons interested in radio technique solely with a personal aim and without pecuniary interest.”

Some administrations have issued experimental licenses for such satellites operating in amateur-satellite frequency bands. The IARU has coordinated these satellites as well, to reduce the possibility of harmful interference that might result from uncoordinated operation. Since 1 July 2014 it has not been possible to coordinate experimental satellites in the 144-146 MHz band because of the high probability of harmful interference in this heavily used band.

Educational satellite projects have grown in popularity as launch opportunities have increased. In 2012 the ITU World Radiocommunication Conference took note of the proliferation of what in Resolution 757 (WRC-12) it called “nanosatellites and picosatellites” and invited WRC-18 (now scheduled for 2019) to consider steps to facilitate their deployment and operation. Two Reports, ITU-R SA.2312 (09/2014) and ITU-R SA.2348 (05/2015), are instructive regarding the characteristics, definitions, spectrum requirements, and notification procedures of and for such satellites, which generally must use spectrum below 1 GHz for operational reasons.

At the following WRC in 2015, in place of Resolution 757 the Member States of the ITU adopted Resolution 659 (WRC-15) in which it was noted that the use of 144-146 MHz and 435-438 MHz by non-amateur satellites is not in accordance with the definition of the amateur-satellite service in the Radio Regulations. Resolution 659 cites the two reports mentioned above and makes it clear that the spectrum needs of what are now called “non-geostationary satellites with short duration missions” should be met either within the service in which the space station is operating or within the space operation service. Further, if new or upgraded allocations to the space operation service are required, studies should be limited to the frequency ranges 150.05-174 MHz and 400.15-420 MHz.

Accordingly, effective 1 August 2017 the IARU will be following revised guidelines for satellite frequency coordination.

The strong preference is for all satellites using spectrum allocated to the amateur and amateur-satellite services to operate under amateur licenses and within the definition of the amateur-satellite service and the service-specific Article 25 of the Radio Regulations. The IARU believes the definition is sufficiently broad to encompass nearly all educational satellite projects that include giving students hands-on experience with radiocommunication and are conducted under an amateur license.

The IARU will only coordinate a non-amateur satellite if an administration directs in writing that it be operated in an amateur-satellite band under an experimental or other non-amateur license.

Satellites with combined amateur and non-amateur missions will continue to be coordinated.

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination http://www.iaru.org/satellite.html

IARU Satellite Coordination Status pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Join New Zealand’s Most Exciting Amateur Radio Project – KiwiSAT

KiwiSat - AMSAT-ZLYes, we’re going into space and you can be part of it!

AMSAT-ZL has reached a staging point in the development of their satellite project, KiwiSAT.
We’re ready to go, ready to get up there!

The exciting KiwiSAT project, to create and launch a New Zealand produced satellite, started
several years back. Yes, it has suffered innumerable set-backs, relying heavily on assistance
from our American brothers and sisters, a reliance cut off mid-stream by USA moves on ITAR
(International Traffic in Arms Regulations). Right then the work was well advanced but based
on the USA standards and criteria. Suddenly the development was back to square one,
requiring redesign of almost everything.

The KiwiSAT Team met that challenge and has produced a fine unit ready to launch. Then
came another set-back. Our critically important Leader of the KiwiSAT Engineering Team,
Fred Kennedy ZL1BYP, was struck down and driven to endure many months of medical
procedures. This has have left him unable to continue his important work.

It’s time for renewal.

Over time the support team has aged, drifting from their positions of youth and ability. Much
has been achieved but all to no avail if KiwiSAT sits on a shelf.

Can you help?

AMSAT-ZL is looking both to its members and to the general New Zealand amateur radio
population for a coordinator to join the team and lead the project through this final stage. We’re
making history. We’re going into space!

We need a volunteer “Orbit Insertion Team” consisting of a Launch Co-ordinator and as many
assistants as he/she requires to undertake the task of securing a launch for KiwiSAT. This new
team will also take over Fred Kennedy’s leadership responsibilities. In parallel, the established
KiwiSAT engineering team will continue their involvement, giving support along the way.

Much of the new team’s work will be organisational rather than hands-on engineering.
Involved is arranging final environmental testing of KiwiSAT, identifying and negotiating a
launch, attending the launch and attending to funding for this final phase. Basic planning is
complete, we need action.

Other tasks will undoubtedly be crop up however it is envisaged that the current team will
ensure the preparation of KiwiSAT to full flight status is completed.

Offers need to be received by June 30, 2017. The AMSAT-ZL Committee will then appoint a
team and leader. Offers can be advised to the AMSAT-ZL Secretary, 894 Ponga Road, RD 4,
Auckland 2584 or by Email to iana@kcbbs.gen.nz or to myself tdcarrell@gmail.com. Email either
of us for more details.

Financial assistance is available to enable the successful applicant to meet for a briefing with
Fred in Auckland, July this year.

Thank you, Terry, ZL3QL, President AMSAT-ZL.

KiwiSAT http://www.kiwisat.org.nz/

AMSAT-ZL http://www.amsat-zl.org.nz/

Source: NZART InfoLine 356

Join Virtual Buildathon and build satellite antenna

Chertsey Radio Club is running a virtual build-a-thon to construct a dual-band satellite antenna for 2m/70cm using low-cost parts and it’s open to all.

They will be using WebEx so access to a PC/Tablet, webcam and Internet will be needed to take advantage of the sessions.

They will be starting the virtual buildathon with the small diplexer kit by HA8LFK, kits will no more than £20 depending on shipping and import tax, as always you pay what we pay, no additional costs.

Please email chertseyradioclub <at> hotmail.com to register your interest.

Further information at
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/06/virtual-buildathon-is-back.html