Making QO-100 contacts from North America – A new challenge

QO-100 North America CertfificateIt is understandable that amateur radio operators in North America are disappointed that they cannot experience the fun of using QO100. However, although the footprint charts that have been published show that it is not possible, there have been good reports recently about the successful QO-100 expedition in Indonesia. In particular YC1HVZ/P successfully operated through the QO100 narrow band transponder from OI42DE at -1.2 degrees elevation!

QO-100 Indonesia Contact

This success suggests that it should be possible to make contacts through QO-100 from at least one North American location.

Examination of the footprint maps and the BATC / AMSAT QO100 dish pointing tool https://eshail.batc.org.uk/point/ shows that the historic site at Signal Hill at St Johns on Newfoundland may be just the location from which to make the attempt.

QO-100 Newfoundland Contact

There would be a lot of challenges to be overcome!

Would the usual QO100 groundstation be sufficient or would a large dish and high power on the 2.4GHz be required? Could activity include operation of DATV through the wideband transponder? As signals from the ground station will probably be relying on tropospheric ducting for the first few miles, an alternative site, lower down, near the beach, might actually be better. What time of year, and what weather conditions might be most favourable? And perhaps the biggest unknown is whether the footprint maps for QO100 reflect the actual coverage or it is squinted towards the east by a couple of degrees?

Having been involved with supporting the QARS and AMSAT-DL since the inception of QO100, AMSAT-UK and BATC would like to establish this challenge and will award trophies as follows.

The station that succeeds in having the first 2-way QSO via the QO-100 narrow band transponder when operating from Newfoundland.

The station that succeeds in having more than 100 2-way QSOs via the QO-100 narrow band transponder when operating from Newfoundland.

The station that succeeds in having the first 2-way DATV QSOs via the via the QO-100 wide band transponder when operating from Newfoundland.

Subsequent operations from Newfoundland will also be eligible to apply for a special Certificate

Watch QO-100 North America Challenge talk at 2022 AMSAT-UK Colloquium

Details of tests being planned, and general questions should be submitted by email to
awards@amsat-uk.org
Claims for trophies and certificates should also be submitted to the same address.

QO-100 Award for contact from North America Word Document Here

QSL cards and award for receiving SWSU satellites

CubeSat released from the ISS

CubeSat released from the ISS

On July 21 ten amateur radio CubeSats built by students at the Southwestern State University were deployed from the ISS. QSL cards and a diploma are available for receiving the SSTV, APRS and Voice messages

On his website Dmitry Pashkov R4UAB reports:

Small spacecraft (ICA), created on the YUZGU-55 platform, have been operating in real space flight for more than ten days. The cyclogram of work includes the transmission of voice messages, telemetry, call sign and SSTV images.

In view of the great interest in the space experiment “Radioskaf”, which is aimed at popularizing space research, Southwestern State University will be happy to send a QSL card to all radio amateurs who have successfully conducted a communication session with satellites.

To receive a QSL card, you need to send information: call sign, location, session date and time, carrier frequency, modulation type (APRS, FM-Voice, Robot36) and the result of a successful session (audio sample, telemetry text and image). The data is sent in the form of Applications for QSL. In the return letter you will receive the address where you need to send the card.

To obtain a diploma, you need to take 10 different SSTV images and voice messages, as well as decode 10 APRS telemetry messages (AFSK 1142 baud format) from any of the satellites, and apply for a Diploma

Satellite frequencies:

437.0000 MHz — SWSU-55 #8 — RS6S
437.0125 MHz — KETs#2 — RS12S
437.0250 MHz — KETs#1 — RS9S
437.0500 MHz — SWSU-55 #1 & R-390 #1 — RS10S
437.0750 MHz — SWSU-55 #2 — RS11S
437.0750 MHz — SWSU-55 #3 — RS1S
437.0870 MHz — SWSU-55 #4 — RS2S
437.0870 MHz — SWSU-55 #6 — RS4S
437.1000 MHz — SWSU-55 #5 — RS3S
437.1125 MHz — SWSU-55 #7 & R-390 #2 — RS5S

Source R4UAB
https://r4uab.ru/2022/08/02/diplomnaya-programma-mka-yuzgu-55/
https://twitter.com/R4UAB

Nader Omer ST2NH describes how to receive the satellites at
https://twitter.com/st2nh/status/1554223850329718785

Ten amateur radio CubeSats deployed from ISS
https://amsat-uk.org/2022/07/21/ten-amateur-radio-cubesats-deployed-from-iss/

Summer 2022 OSCAR News now available to download

2022-06 Oscar News Front CoverE-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the Summer 2022 edition of OSCAR News, issue 238, here.

The paper edition edition will be sent to postal members and should arrive in the next 2-3 weeks.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• CelesTrak Changing Domain Used
• Our thanks to – Frank Heritage M0AEU
• Retirement Letter
• FUNcubes update June 2022
• FUNcube-Next
• STAR-XL: Student Transponder for Satellite Ranging on X & L-band
• First flight of Vega-C
• New HO-113 AMSAT Distance Record Set
• Satlist a valuable resource!
• Satellite Operations from the Gambia
• Electromagnetic Field
• G3OUA Works CN88
• Increase in Satellite activity from Jersey
• GB70U Guernsey
• IARU Region 1 Satellite Coordinator’s report
• ARISS Women in Space SSTV Activity

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download the quarterly publication OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

1240-1300 MHz: ITU-R WP5A Meeting Report

Galileo LogoIARU report on the recent meeting of ITU-R WP5A, the lead group responsible for developing the Conference Preparatory Meeting report about the WRC23 agenda item on the 23cm band.

The latest meeting of ITU-R WP5A concluded on June 2, 2022. The IARU was represented by Ole Garpstad (LA2RR – ITU Lead) and Barry Lewis (G4SJH – WRC23 AI9.1b Lead).

ITU-R WP5A is the study group at ITU which deals in part with topics related to the amateur and amateur satellite services. It is the lead group responsible for developing the Conference Preparatory Meeting (CPM) report on agenda item 9.1(b).

This Agenda Item provides for a “Review of the amateur service and the amateur-satellite service allocations in the frequency band 1240‑1300 MHz to determine if additional measures are required to ensure protection of the radionavigation-satellite (space-to-Earth) service operating in the same band in accordance with Resolution 774 (WRC‑19);” The CPM Report will form the basis for consideration of this issue at WRC-23 next year.

At the conclusion of the recent WP5A meeting a draft recommendation was prepared which will provide guidelines to administrations to ensure the protection of the RNSS primary allocation from the secondary amateur and amateur satellite services.

The draft recommendation will be the most important element of the WP5A work going forward for the amateur and amateur satellite services in the 23cm band. The working document contains a number of proposals for severe limitations on amateur usage of the band including transmitter power constraints. Very low power levels are proposed for large portions of the band (100% in one case). Proposals also identify possible frequency band usage limitations for broadband applications (e.g. ATV), narrowband applications and amateur satellite services in 1260-1270 MHz.

A full report of the WP5A meeting can be found here.
https://www.iaru.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/06/Report-from-WP5A_June-2022-FINAL.pdf

None of these proposals are adopted at this time and work will continue at the next meeting of WP5A to rationalise the variations proposed by national telecom-administrations.

The IARU will work to minimise the constraints on amateur radio activities and continue to seek amendments to the draft recommendations through the ITU process, but as a secondary user, radio amateurs should understand the need to protect the Radionavigation Satellite Service (RNSS) in many consumer and industry applications (like autonomous vehicles) that will lead to some restrictions on our use of the 23 cm band.

FUNcube-1 / AO73 Update

The Queen's Platinum Jubilee 2022Many will be aware that FUNcube-1 has been transmitting a special Fitter message to commemorate her Majesty the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee earlier this month.

Everyone who receives this message and uploads it to the Data Warehouse using the Dashboard can generate a certificate to remember this historic event. The special message includes a link to a website that has the full instructions. It is intended to keep this message active until the end of June.

The spacecraft’s orbit continues to run near the sun’s terminator and this is resulting in less than optimal solar power generation. The battery bus voltage is now centering around 7.45 volts rather than the 8+ volts that we have seen for many years. We believe that this reduced voltage level may be due to a combination of factors, illumination levels, battery and/or solar panel degradation or, possibly, gradual changes in some component values within the EPS. It is also possible that the high spin/tumble rates that we experienced over the recent months may be involved. Our thanks to to Colin VK5HI and his team for continuing to keep track of this issue for us.

Operators may have noticed that the spacecraft is now in high power telemetry mode when in sunlight and in receive only mode during eclipse. Although the transponder is not currently active, with the rapid fading presently being experienced on the downlink, the high power telemetry setting will assist listeners to decode the data more easily.

We continue to be extremely grateful to all those stations who continue to contribute their data to the FUNcube data warehouse. The information you are providing is invaluable to the FUNcube to team and will greatly assist us in managing the spacecraft through its “middle age” after more than eight years in space!