Lunar Amateur Radio Satellites DSLWP-A1/A2

Full Moon 2010 - Credit Gregory H Revera

Full Moon 2010 – Credit Gregory H Revera

Mingchuan Wei BG2BHC reports DSLWP is a lunar formation flying mission for low frequency radio astronomy, amateur radio and education, consists of 2 microsatellites.

Developed by students at the Harbin Institute of Technology the amateur radio payload onboard DSLWP-A1 will provide telecommand uplink and telemetry / digital image downlink. An open telecommand is also designed to allow amateurs to send commands to take and download an image.

The satellites are 50x50x40 cm with a mass of about 45 kg and are 3-axis stabilized. Two linear polarization antennas are mounted along and normal to the flight direction.

The team proposes downlinks for A1 on 435.425 MHz and 436.425 MHz while downlinks for A2 would be 435.400 MHz and 436.400 MHz using 10K0F1DCN or 10K0F1DEN 250 bps GMSK with concatenated codes or JT65B.

Planning a launch into a 200 x 9000 km lunar orbit in June 2018. Further info at http://lilacsat.hit.edu.cn/

IARU Amateur Satellite Frequency Coordination pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

5 GHz to 10 GHz Lunar Transponder Mission

View of Earth from the Moon AdobeStock_77398324AMSAT-NA plans 5 GHz to 10 GHz transponders on a spacecraft expected to launch in September 2018 into a Lunar orbit.

Heimdallr is a 3 axis stabilized 6U CubeSat with a mass of approximately 8 kg. It will have a Cold Gas Thruster for inertia dump and a star tracker for navigation. Deployable, gimbled solar panels will produce up to 100 watts of DC power, electric propulsion will be used to achieve lunar orbit.

There will be a combination of omni and directional patch antennas on one side of spacecraft.

The first part of mission is to provide Telemetry, Tracking, and Command (TT&C) to obtain lunar orbit. The second part is to perform the data downlink experiment while the final part is to provide a two way regenerative repeater and analog repeater in lunar orbit for lifetime of satellite.

Proposing these downlinks:
• Omni transponder: 10.451 GHz +/- 0.5 MHz
• Directional transponder: 10.4575 GHz. +/- 3.5 MHz
• Analog transponder: 10.4665 GHz. +/- 2.0 MHz

For the first part of the mission (TT&C) using 300 bps BPSK 1/2 rate viterbi Ranging 1.5 Mbps BPSK DSSS. For the  second part of mission 4.5 Mbps QPSK ½ rate DVB-S2. For the final part of mission 25 kbps BPSK 1/5 rate DVB-S2.

Proposing these Uplinks
• Omni transponder: 5.651 GHz +/- 0.5 MHz
• Directional transponder: 5.6575 GHz. +/- 3.5 MHz
• Analog transponder: 5.665 GHz. +/- 2.0 MHz

A link budget is available at
https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B3u-mSOWBMISYnZyZGJpeThKeU0&usp=sharing

It is anticipated that a 1 or 2 metre dish will be required using the AMSAT designed ground station equipment.

Source IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Status pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Heimdallr satellite – 5 Teams Share First Round of NASA CubeSat Prizes
http://spacenews.com/5-teams-share-first-round-of-nasa-cubesat-prizes/

 

UK CubeSat Forum – Lunar opportunity

View of Earth from the Moon AdobeStock_77398324Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) and Goonhilly Earth Station (GES) are looking for CubeSat passenger payloads on a Lunar mission.

SSTL and GES are teaming up with ESA to create the world’s first commercial deep space mission. They plan to carry customer payload in the form of CubeSats into lunar orbit and provide the relay link back to Earth via Goonhilly. The launch is planned for 2019.

Orbital passengers e.g. nanosatellites and CubeSats will be deployed from the Mothership and will operate in lunar orbit.

The UK CubeSat Forum can help in creating new contacts for joint proposals, so do post on their site should you want to be involved!
http://www.cubesatforum.org.uk/wordpress/2016/08/30/call-for-lunar-missions-payloads/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/UKCubeSatForum

Download the related documents from http://www.goonhilly.org/lunar

4M – End of Mission

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload - Credit LuxSpace

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload – Credit LuxSpace

The JT65B amateur radio payload, which successfully completed a lunar flyby, has fallen silent after transmitting for 438 hours.

During the afternoon of November 10 the battery voltage dropped from 13.1V to 12.1V and continued falling. The last signal was received by Rein W6SZ at 01:35 UT on November 11 when the battery voltage had fallen to 8.4 volts.

Ghislain LX2RG posted the following to the Moon Net list:

Here at Luxspace, we have to thank you all for the reports, for the tracking, and we also hope that we provided you with the challenges you expected.

4M may possibly awaken from time to time if illumination becomes better.

We shall now endeavor to prepare the next one.

Manfred Memorial Moon Mission (4M) LX0OHB-4M http://moon.luxspace.lu/blog/

4M Lunar Payload https://amsat-uk.org/2014/10/15/4m-lunar-payload-integrated-keps-released/

Press coverage of 4M ham radio lunar payload

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload - Credit LuxSpace

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload – Credit LuxSpace

The successful amateur radio lunar payload 4M launched on October 23 has generated a number of articles, the latest is in The Daily Beast.

Read The Daily Beast article about the first privately-funded spacecraft to travel the Moon at http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/26/luxembourg-and-china-team-up-on-private-mission-to-the-moon.html

Since its launch 4M has been transmitting the digital mode JT65B on 145.980 MHz. The signal was first picked up 79 minutes after launch by Roland Zurmely PY4ZBZ in Brazil. The signal was very weak as 4M flew around the Moon but radio amateurs still managed to copy it. 4M is now heading back toward Earth.

4M reception by Berend PA3ARK signal level -8 dB

4M reception by Berend PA3ARK

Ghislain Ruy LX2RG has provided some additional information on the 4M project:

This project is entirely funded by our company [Luxspace], with strictly no commercial purpose. It means also that it had to be cheap, fast, efficient. In the partner page, you will find all those partner companies that have provided their services for free or at reduced cost. http://moon.luxspace.lu/partners/

I had only 6 months to set it all up, starting from blank page or quite so. I mean all really. And on top of that a mission from my boss: take the youngest by the hand and lead them to success. Done. I have repaid what I have been given by the elders when I was a beginner.

Here are at Luxspace, we are quite a lot of skilled high level engineers, and to say the truth, we do not object having fun on top of that.

LSE space offered for free to deal with all the data handling and setup all the website, data base, and so on. They did it in a very few months, and choose the most practical way for them in order to be in time and operational. And we are. As simple as it is.

We have learned a lot during these 6 months, and the last 6 days have been quite an education also.

The next mission will integrate all what was discovered and learned. My homework this week is to write it all down. Now, it is Java, and that’s it. Could have been better, but it works as expected or so, and that’s what counts. Fine tuning will come later.

Believe or not, I knew nothing of JT65B 7 months ago. We have put it all in a small microprocessor, including SDR !

Read the 4M blog at http://moon.luxspace.lu/blog/

For tracking information just enter your latitude and longitude at http://moon.luxspace.lu/tracking/

Lunar Ham Radio Payload Launched https://amsat-uk.org/2014/10/23/lunar-ham-radio-payload-launched/

ARRL – Radio Amateurs Report Hearing 4M Moon Orbiter JT65B Signal
http://www.arrl.org/news/radio-amateurs-report-hearing-4m-moon-orbiter-jt65b-signal

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4M Lunar Payload Update

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload - Credit LuxSpace

LX0OHB-4M amateur radio lunar payload – Credit LuxSpace

On October 25 Ghislain Ruy LX2RG provided this update on the 4M lunar amateur radio payload.

Signals from 4M are quite weak. This is not due to a loss of power as telemetry shows normal parameters, but to the attitude of the last stage that places a deep of the radiation pattern in the direction of the Earth. I hope that Earth’s movement with respect to the inertial attitude of the last stage will give better results in the coming days.

The 4M is becoming a real challenge now, and receiving the signals during flyby will be quite an achievement. A little bit away from the original goal though, but this risk was known.

One sure result is the radiation measurement that showed what was to be expected, and the graphs will soon be pubished on the blog.

I hope you will be able to receive during the AMSAT-DL AGM this weekend, but you will have to put 16+dB [antenna] gain at least.

Radio amateurs are encouraged to receive and report the signals http://moon.luxspace.lu/receiving-4m/

For tracking information just enter your latitude and longitude at http://moon.luxspace.lu/tracking/

See the 4M payload Blog at http://moon.luxspace.lu/blog/

Lunar Ham Radio Payload Launched https://amsat-uk.org/2014/10/23/lunar-ham-radio-payload-launched/

4M Lunar Payload https://amsat-uk.org/2014/10/15/4m-lunar-payload-integrated-keps-released/

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