Inspiring Youth with Science in Space

Astronaut Sunita Williams KD5PLB answers questions from a student using amateur radio

Astronaut Sunita Williams KD5PLB answers questions from a student using amateur radio

NASA highlight the role of amateur radio in letting young people speak directly with astronauts and cosmonauts on the International Space Station:

An ARISS contact takes place as a part of a comprehensive suite of education activities. To prepare for an exchange, students study the space station and the research conducted there. They also learn about wireless technology, radio science, and satellite communication used for space exploration.

The space station must pass over these earthbound communicators during amateur radio transmissions in order to relay signals between the space station’s ham radio and ground receivers. Other factors affect the timing of scheduled contacts, including weather, crew availability, and the schedules of visiting vehicles.

These ham radio conversations usually last about 10 minutes. Crew members answer questions from students as they and community members look on. During a pass, the crew can answer an average of 18 questions, depending on their complexity.

Ham radio on the space station connects and inspires students in four ways: providing first-hand education about life in space, directly connecting students with space station crew, sharing amateur radio technologies, and building global partnerships.

Read the full NASA story at
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/b4h-3rd/ge-inspiring-youth-with-space-science

ISS contact planned for Bampton School in Devon

ISS contact with Bampton SchoolAn International Space Station ARISS school contact has been planned between astronaut Drew Morgan KI5AAA and participants at Bampton School, Bampton, United Kingdom on Tuesday, October 8, 2019 at 12:51 GMT, which is 1:51 PM BST.

The contact between GB4BPS at the school and Drew Morgan KI5AAA operating NA1SS on the ISS will be audible across the British Isles and North Western Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

The live stream of the event will be at https://live.ariss.org/

You can listen to the 145.800 MHz FM radio signal online from anywhere in the world by using a UK-based WebSDR such as:
SUWS Farnham WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
Goonhilly https://vhf-goonhilly.batc.org.uk/

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

School information

Bampton Church of England Primary School, part of the Alumnis Multi Academy Trust is a is a vibrant, friendly and nurturing school, located on the edge of Exmoor National park, serving the small agricultural town of Bampton and surrounding areas of East Devon. We are part of a supportive and friendly community with strong links to our local church, ‘St Michael and All Angels.’

As a church school, our vision, ‘Believe, Belong, Become’ is embedded throughout our school and curriculum. Through core Christian values, we teach children to be able to understand and articulate their views about what they ‘believe’ and to respect the beliefs of others around them. We encourage them to understand how they ‘belong’ to family, school and the local and wider community, and how they fit into, and can impact the wider world around them. We encourage children to think about how and what they are aiming to ‘become’ as they grow, and how they are able to shape their world.

Through Christian values, together we inspire individuals to celebrate their uniqueness and empower them to become confident, aspirational, inquisitive and flourish in the modern world. We celebrate our school values of; Joy, Aiming High, Friendship, Kindness, Respect, Trust and Honesty, and Forgiveness and Compassion, and embed these values into everyday school life.

We offer an exciting, broad and balanced curriculum in a happy, stimulating environment, supported by a wide range of after school clubs and high quality, offsite residential visits. We are always seeking ways to enhance the teaching and learning experience for our children, with a breadth of experiences that develop the whole child and create a genuine love of learning. We are passionate about bringing STEM subjects to life and encouraging children to see how these subjects translate into the world beyond school.

Questions:

1. Corey (Age 7): Has the International Space Station ever suffered any damage from a meteor strike?

2. Thea (Age 9): How can space be made accessible to people with disabilities?

3. Sophie (Age 10): How long will it take you to get used to gravity again when you get home?

4. Jesse (Age 6): What would happen if I took a snowball into space?

5. Rufus (Age 8): How do you get to and from the International Space Station?

6. Alfie (Age 10): If you cut yourself in space, who acts as the doctor to fix it for you?

7. Willow (Age 10): Do you dream differently in space or dream of anything in particular?

8. Jacob (Age 10): If I kick a football in space, how far would it travel?

9. Maya (Age 9): When you were a child did you want to go to space and is there anything that disappointed you about it?

10. Hetty (Age 8): What does it feel like when you are in a rocket and you are about to get shot into space?

11. Corey asking Oliver’s question (Age 9): If you could make one improvement to the International Space Station, what would it be?

12. Thea asking Nancy’s question (Age 5): The International Space Station travels at 5 miles per second, can you feel it moving when travelling fast like you can on earth?

13. Sophie asking Eban’s question (Age 6): The International Space Station is so fast, how does it not crash into the other satellites that are also in orbit?

14. Jesse asking Sorrel’s question (Age 9): Did you have any concerns looking back at Earth for the first time?

15. Rufus asking Macy’s question (Age 9): How many planets have you seen from the International Space Station?

16. Alfie asking Ellie’s question (Age 10): If you could grow any plant in the International Space Station what would it be?

17. Willow asking Eve’s question (Age 10): How long have you been on the International Space Station and how long do you think you could stay there for?

18. Jacob asking Johnny’s question (Age 6): What time goes your clock show on the Space Station? Is it USA, UK, Russian or Japan time?

19. Maya asking Ruan’s question (Age 9): Do you get to keep your customised seat or anything else as a souvenir of your trip?

20. Hetty asking William’s question (Age 8): We are getting aware about the amount of rubbish on earth, are you worried about the amount of space junk and can you see it?

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues.  With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums.  Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.

73 Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

For more information on ARISS, see http://www.ariss.org/

How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

Bampton School
https://bamptonschool.org/the-news-weve-all-been-waiting-for/
https://twitter.com/BamptonSCH/

Exmoor Magazine – Eyes to the Skies in Devon
https://www.exmoormagazine.co.uk/eyes-to-the-skies-in-devon/

Devon school students to contact ISS

ISS contact with Bampton SchoolYoung people at Bampton School in Devon will get an opportunity to use amateur radio to talk to an astronaut on the International Space Station on Tuesday, October 8.

The school has tweeted:
“The news we’ve all been waiting for: @BamptonSCH contact with @Space_Station will take place Tues 8th October at 13:51:26. Children will be asking questions to astronaut @AstroDrewMorgan KI5AAA. Questions are with NASA & we’ll let you know who’ll be asking them very soon!”
https://twitter.com/BamptonSCH/status/1178754952233132032

The ISS contact with GB4BPS at the school should be receiveable across the British Isles and North West Europe on 145.800 MHz FM (Note ISS uses 5 kHz FM deviation so wider RX filter for 25 kHz channel spacing is better).

The contact with Drew Morgan KI5AAA operating NA1SS is currently planned for Tuesday, October 8 at 12:51:26 GMT (1:51 PM BST) but as with all ISS contacts last minute changes can take place.

It should be possible to receive the 145.800 MHz signal online from anywhere in the world by using a UK-based WebSDR such as:
SUWS Farnham WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
Goonhilly https://vhf-goonhilly.batc.org.uk/

The contact is planned to be streamed live at https://live.ariss.org/

Bampton School
https://bamptonschool.org/the-news-weve-all-been-waiting-for/
https://twitter.com/BamptonSCH/

Exmoor Magazine – Eyes to the Skies in Devon https://www.exmoormagazine.co.uk/eyes-to-the-skies-in-devon/

ARISS Next Generation Radio System Completes Critical Flight Certification Tests

ARISS 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 - Credit John Brier KG4AKV

ARISS 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 – Credit John Brier KG4AKV

The Interoperable Radio System (IORS), ARISS’ next generation radio system successfully completed a battery of stressful tests required as part of the final certification of the hardware for launch to and operation on the International Space Station.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoDuring the week of July 8, the IORS, consisting of the JVC Kenwood D-710GA Radio and the AMSAT developed Multi-Voltage Power Supply, successfully completed a series of Electro-magnetic Interference (EMI)/Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) tests to ensure that the ARISS hardware will not interfere with the ISS systems or other payloads. Testing continued into the following week, where the IORS successfully passed power quality and acoustics testing. These tests verified that the ARISS IORS will not introduce harmful signals back into the ISS power system and is quiet enough to meet ISS acoustic requirements. ARISS Hardware Team members Lou McFadin, W5DID and Kerry Banke, N6IZW were at the NASA Johnson Space Center supporting this two week battery of tests in concert with the NASA test and certification team.

Kerry Banke states, “Since the IORS is being qualified to operate on 120VDC, 28VDC and Russian 28VDC as well as transmitting on VHF or UHF, a lot of test combinations were required to cover all cases. Each input voltage type was also tested at low, medium and high line voltage. Moreover, additional permutations were required to test the IORS under no load, medium load and full load at each voltage level. So it should not be surprising why the tests took two weeks to complete.”

Successful completion of these tests represents a key milestone in preparing the IORS for launch. ARISS can now begin final assembly of the flight safety certification in preparation for launch. ARISS is working towards launch ready status by the end of the year.

ARISS contact planned for Rowan Preparatory School UK

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, Surrey, United Kingdom.

The direct contact between NA1SS and GB4RPS is planned for 1:48:55 PM BST (12:48:55 GMT) on Thursday, June 20, 2019 and the downlink signals will be audible in the UK and parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Live streaming of the event is expected at https://live.ariss.org/

You can receive the ISS signal online from anywhere in the world by using the Farnham WebSDR at http://farnham-sdr.com/

School presentation

Rowan Preparatory School is a vibrant, friendly and nurturing community where girls are encouraged to be themselves. Our school is an independent preparatory school for girls between the ages of 2 to 11, located in the heart of Claygate (near Esher) in Surrey. A school with traditional values and a forward thinking approach to education, we seek to offer a broad and adventurous curriculum full of exciting opportunities.

School life at Rowan is inspiring and offers a breadth of experiences which develop the whole child. The warmth that is evident when you walk through the door at Rowan creates the ideal learning environment for girls to fulfil their potential. They are nurtured and allowed to grow as individuals, encouraged to take risks and have a go at new skills and interests which will enrich their lives. Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths are at the heart of the curriculum at Rowan. Girls make the most of our dedicated specialist teaching spaces and delight in practical learning opportunities in the Engineering and Technology suite. From 3D printers to our radio recording studio, the environment at Rowan is geared towards encouraging creative and exciting learning, ensuring that the girls explore, question and discover in every area of learning. We are passionate about bringing STEM subjects to life and encouraging the girls to see how these subjects translate into the world beyond school. Experiences which will foster successful and inspirational women of the future!

Rowan girls are prepared for the transition to a wide range of successful day and boarding schools and we pride ourselves on finding the right senior school environment for each and every girl. A personalised approach to learning and outstanding pastoral care in our happy environment, ensures that every girl develops a genuine love of learning.

Students Questions:

1. Sophia (Yr 1): How did the International Space Station get built when it just balances in the air?

2. Izzy (Yr 2): What are the challenges to growing food in space if astronauts are to stay in space for longer?

3. Emily (Yr 3): Does your digestion change because in space there is no gravity so your intestine will float in your body?

4. Ashley (Yr 4): Of all the experiments that you have done in space, what has given the most surprising result or has been the most exciting?

5. Alessi (Yr 5): If you spin a ball in the ISS will it keep spinning or will it stop, and if it stops, what stops it?

6. Alannah: (Yr 6): In the future, will it be possible that someone can spend their entire life in space and if so, would their life expectancy change?

7. Grace (Yr 2): If you do a handstand in space does your blood go to your head if there is no gravity?

8. Delilah (Yr 4): Is there anything you could learn about how bacteria and viruses behave in space that could help us defeat infectious bugs around the Earth?

9. Emilia (Yr 5): NASA have said that they will establish a permanent presence on the moon within the next decade, how will they do this and what is the most exciting benefit for human kind?

10. Anya (Yr 6): In all of your time spent on board the ISS, what is the most exciting and extraordinary thing that you have experienced?

11. Sophia saying Zoe’s question (Yr 1): What new information about space are you hoping to learn?

12. Izzy saying Ballie’s question (Yr 2): Can you escape from a black hole?

13. Emily saying Eloise’s question (Yr 3): We have learnt that astronauts are very busy and work long hours. So when you have free time, what do you do for fun?

14. Ashley saying Annabel’s question (Yr 4): How do you get rid of rubbish in space?

15. Alessi saying Sabine’s question (Yr 5): What are you looking forward to the most in nature when you return?

16. Alannah saying Lucy’s question (Yr 6): Our teachers and parents tell us that having a balanced diet is important. Is your diet closely monitored or do you have freedom to choose what you eat? What is your favourite meal?

17. Grace saying Olivia’s question (Yr 1): How do you sleep in space?

18. Delilah saying Amelia’s question (Yr 3): What kind of dangers might you experience in space?

19. Emilia saying Luna’s question (Yr 2): What is the most beautiful thing you can see in space?

20. Anya saying 4J’s question (Yr 4): We have heard that some people don’t believe that the Moon landing took place, what is the best evidence that we have to disprove this theory?

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crew members on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crew members on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.

For more information, see http://www.ariss.org/

How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

ARISS SSTV transmissions April 11-14

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station.

UPDATE April 12: Transmissions on Thursday and Friday, April 11/12 had very low audio. Dmitry R4UAB reports the ISS cosmonauts plan to try to fix the issue on Saturday, April 13.

The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019.

This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.

Once the event begins the transmissions will be broadcast at 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Ham radio operators and other radio enthusiasts are invited to post the images they receive at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Moreover, on request, ARISS SSTV Award Manager Slawek SQ3OOK will provide an SSTV Award, details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

To submit a request, please follow this procedure:

1. Load your decoded images at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/submit.php

2. Fill in the application form on the website https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and is subject to change at any time.

Please check the following for news and the most current information
AMSAT-BB https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
ARISS https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
ISS Ham https://twitter.com/RF2Space

You can use online radios to receive signals from the International Space Station:
• SUWS WebSDR located Farnham near London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR located European Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

ISS SSTV links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/