Kenilworth students’ amateur radio contact with space station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

This is the high definition video feed from the live contact between the Kenilworth School and Sixth Form GB4KSN and astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT onboard the International Space Station NA1SS on Friday, December 14, 2018.

The event starts with a brief introduction from the head teacher, Mr Hayden Abbott, before the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact.

ARISS Operations UK team lead takes over at approximately 12 minutes and leads the audience into the contact which occurs at approximately 58:05 minutes into the video.

Watch the video of the event

Kenilworth school ARISS contact
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2018/december/ariss-event-1412.htm

ARISS http://www.ariss-eu.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS inspired 2 million young people

UK PM Theresa May and Tim Peake with some of the young people involved in Principia mission

UK PM Theresa May and Tim Peake with some of the young people involved in Principia mission

A new report has found more than 2 million young people in the UK engaged with education and outreach programmes linked to Tim Peake’s Principia Mission to space. The report highlights the role of ARISS and amateur radio during the mission.

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

The UK Space Agency ran a £3 million education campaign alongside the mission to the International Space Station, which blasted off three years ago tomorrow (15 December), to inspire a greater interest and understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as well as space.

The campaign – the largest and most successful ever organised for a European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut – encompassed 34 separate projects and covered a spectrum of ages and subjects, including mass participation experiments in schools using seeds that had been in space.

The report, produced by the UK Space Agency, found one in three UK schools took part in at least one Principia activity. Every region of the UK ran school activities with all projects accessible to boys and girls. The majority of the 34 projects focused on primary school children although some went right through to university.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoHuman Spaceflight & Microgravity Programme Manager at the UK Space Agency Libby Jackson @LibbyJackson__ tweeted:
This report records my most memorable and most proud of professional achievement. Thank you to each and every one of the amazing team and partner organisations for what we did together along with @spacegovuk, @esa and @astro_timpeake. The impacts will be felt for many years yet.

ARISS-UK Ciaran Morgan @M0XTD tweeted:
Thank you @LibbyJackson__ and to the amazing team at @spacegovuk for choosing @ARISS_status to be part of the #Principia mission. We are proud to have taken part and to have made such an impression with so many students. Looking forward to the future!

Download the full Principia campaign report, or summary education report from
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/on-third-anniversary-of-tim-peakes-space-mission-report-reveals-over-2-million-inspired-by-education-campaign

ARISS Principia https://principia.ariss.org/

ARISS-UK videos of the Principia amateur radio contacts
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQS-yDk7PdE9cRv4MNu8pCw

ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, Warwickshire

Dr Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Dr. Serena M. Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

The event is scheduled Friday, December 14, 2018 at approximately 1255 GMT with live streaming starting from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM and can be received on your phone or tablet via the Farnham WebSDR

School Information:

Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year’s GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood – Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

GB4KSN antenna mast

GB4KSN antenna mast

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that “space” smells very metallic. Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station. What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you’re moving when you’re on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What’s your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAbout ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/ 

73, Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

How to hear the ISS, with an amateur radio transceiver, scanner or by listening online on your phone or tablet via a WebSDR https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

The event will be streamed live from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

ARISS and Amateur Radio in Raspberry Pi magazine article

Students programming the Astro Pi computers Credit: UK Space Agency (Max Alexander)

Radio amateur Dave Honess M6DNT is interviewed in the popular Raspberry Pi magazine MagPi about “Taking Education to the Stars”.

The article, on pages 84/85 of issue 75 November 2018 MagPi, covers the educational role of the two Astro Pi units on the International Space Station.

Dave mentions Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS and the work of ARISS – Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, saying:

“Radio remains the only way to communicate with all our spacecraft throughout the solar system, and organisations like ARISS and local HAM radio clubs are, in my opinion, becoming more and more necessary to attract new talent.”

Download the Free PDF of MagPi magazine from
https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi-issues/MagPi75.pdf

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

In 2017 Dave Honess M6DNT and Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS were inducted into the prestigious CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for their educational work in the ISS Astro Pi program and ARISS, Dave said:
“I was really surprised when I heard I’d been inducted into the Hall of Fame, especially alongside Tim! Thank you to CQ magazine for the honour.”

https://amsat-uk.org/2017/05/19/cq-mag-honors-astro-pi-britons/

Since March 2018 Dave Honess M6DNT has been working at ESA ESTEC (European Space Research and Technology Centre) in the Netherlands where he is ISS and International Education Operations Coordinator
https://twitter.com/dave_spice

ARISS http://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

ARISS Joins NASA On-The-Air for a Special SSTV Event

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) is planning a very special Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event from about 1000 UT Saturday, Oct. 27 until 1930 UT Monday, Oct. 29 on 145.800 MHz FM using PD-120.

UPDATE 0930 GMT Oct. 28: SSTV pictures were sent from the ISS on Saturday, the session ended early in the afternoon. Transmissions resumed early Sunday morning.

Helping to support the event will be NASA’s Space, Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Department.

The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program manages NASA’s three most important communications networks: The Space Network (SN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Deep Space Network (DSN).

Just as in past ARISS SSTV commemorations, twelve images will be downlinked, but this time with six featuring the SCaN educational activities while the other six images will commemorate major NASA anniversaries, ie., when NASA was established, astronauts first landing on the moon, etc.

In addition to the fun of receiving these images, participants can qualify for a special endorsement for the NASA On The Air (NOTA) celebration event. To learn more about NOTA visit https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/

Once received, images can be posted and viewed at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

The transmissions are expected to be broadcast at the usual frequency of 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

Source AMSAT News Service

Note the ISS transmissions use the 5 kHz deviation FM standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try using the wider filter. Handheld transceivers generally have a single wide filter fitted as standard and you should get good results outdoors using just a 1/4 wave whip antenna.

ISS SSTV links for tracking and decoding Apps
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

You can receive the SSTV transmissions by using an Online Radio (WebSDR) and the MMSSTV software:
• Listen to the ISS when it is in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
• Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

ISS Fan Club – Tracking / Predictions http://www.issfanclub.com/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

King’s High School ARISS contact on BBC TV

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact – image credit KHS

On April 19 student Eleanor Griffin led the live question and answer session between King’s High School and Warwick Preparatory School (GB4KHS) and astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU on the International Space Station (NA1SS).

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact – image credit KHS

King’s High School strongly encourage their girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of their girls, Eleanor Griffin, to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

When Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: “The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?”

After the ISS contact when asked what this incredible experience had taught her Eleanor replied “Just do it! No one is going to stop you, if you just go and pursue your dreams, you really can do anything.”

Watch the BBC TV news item broadcast on Midlands Today @bbcmtd. Fast forward to 18:45 into the recording at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09z9tw6/midlands-today-evening-news-19042018

In this video the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact, followed at 12:11 by a presentation by ARISS Operations UK team lead Ciaran Morgan M0XTD with the ISS contact commencing at 31:32 into the video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpVc1ikj4pE

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/apply-to-host-an-ariss-contact.html
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick