ISS SSTV in late December

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoThe ARISS team will be supporting Slow Scan TV (SSTV) operations from the International Space Station during the period of December 26-31.

The images will be related to lunar exploration. The transmissions should be available worldwide on 145.800 MHz FM. The planned SSTV mode is PD 120.

Planned start and stop times are currently listed as:
Start – Dec 26 about 18:25 GMT
Stop – Dec 31 about 17:05 GMT

The signal should be receivable even on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

In this video Randy Hall K7AGE shows you how to receive Slow Scan TV (SSTV) images from the International Space Station (ISS).

Several times a year SSTV images are sent from the ISS. In December 2021 from the 26th through the 31st SSTV images will be transmitted.

A simple two-meter amateur radio, or scanner, is able to receive the signal on 145.800 MHz. You can receive the signal using the antenna on an HT, mobile antenna, or a vertical antenna mounted outside.

I show you how to learn when the ISS will be in the range of your station.
Heavens-Above is a good website to use and it will generate a list of passes for your station.

To decode the SSTV signal you will need software on a computer or portable device. I show MMSSTV on my Windows computer decoding the SSTV signal. I also show decoding SSTV on my iPad.

Watch How to receive SSTV images from the ISS

After you receive your ISS images, you may apply for a certificate at –
https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/submit.php

K7AGE video of SSTV sample transmissions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sG4UhlByFyw&t=870s

K7AGE video shows how to build a simple 2 meter antenna
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkmD3Sgz7Q0&t=697s

Heavens Above https://www.heavens-above.com/main.aspx

MMSSTV https://hamsoft.ca/

iPad SSTV https://www.blackcatsystems.com/software/sstv.html

Android https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=xdsopl.robot36&hl=en_US&gl=US

Linux http://users.telenet.be/on4qz/qsstv/index.html

Check the ARISS SSTV blog for the latest information http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

ARISS SSTV Award https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Video of Mary Hare School students contacting Space Station

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The ARISS Operations UK Team have released a 57 minute video of the ARISS event at Mary Hare School for the deaf in Newbury, on Tuesday, October 12, 2021.

Radio amateurs in the UK and across Europe were able to receive the signal from the ISS on 145.800 MHz FM.

The Amateur Radio contact between students at the school, call sign GB4MHN, and astronaut Mark Vande Hei KG5GNP using the call sign NA1SS from onboard the International Space Station, takes place at about 46 mins into the video.

Watch ARISS School Contact between Mary Hare School for the deaf and Mark Vande Hei NA1SS

The contact featured in the BBC TV programme South Today on Tuesday evening. UK viewers can watch the programme online, fast forward to 20:40 in this recording
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0010lxt

BBC News https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-england-berkshire-58912458

Newbury Today story
https://www.newburytoday.co.uk/news/mary-hare-pupils-reach-for-the-stars-in-contact-with-interna-9220499/

Mary Hare School ARISS contact information
https://amsat-uk.org/2021/10/08/ariss-contact-scheduled-for-students-in-newbury-uk/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Free UK amateur radio Online Training course https://essexham.co.uk/train/foundation-online/

ARISS contact scheduled for students in Newbury UK

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has received schedule confirmation for an ARISS radio contact with astronauts. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS).

This will be a direct contact via amateur radio between astronaut Mark Vande Hei KG5GNP onboard the International Space Station and students at the Mary Hare School, Newbury, UK.

Amateur radio station GB4MHN will be the ham radio ground station for this contact.

The downlink frequency for this contact is 145.800 MHz FM and may be heard by listeners in Europe that are within the ISS-footprint.

The ARISS radio contact is scheduled for Tuesday, October 12, 2021 at 11:12:33 UTC, which is 12:12:33 BST or 13:12:33 CEST.

A live feed from the school will be available here https://live.ariss.org/

School Information:

Mary Hare is an aural school for the deaf, we don’t use sign language, instead we teach students to develop lip reading skills and make use of technology. The contact is important for the school as not only will it help inspire students to STEM, it will hopefully demonstrate that no matter the difficulties they have with communication; there are still ways they can accomplish amazing things (“the sky is not the limit!”).

During the week the students will see some exciting chemistry demonstrations, design and fly model rockets, see some space suits, and do some astronomy (observing Jupiter and Saturn in the evening). In lessons they have researched and discussed what it might be like to live in space, done some space themed art, and looked at astronaut food. Hopefully it will be an exciting and inspiring week.

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Rosie (13 yrs): Do you have to learn a sign language to communicate if something goes wrong with the radios in your suit?

2. Jacob (18 yrs): How do you tell directions in space?

3. Harrison (11 yrs): What do the northern lights look like from space?

4. Hollie (16 yrs): How can you shower in zero gravity?

5. Jasper (13 yrs): What’s your most favourite space technology?

6. Milly (18 yrs): If there was a fire, how would you evacuate?

7. Dominika (14 yrs): Do mobile devices work in space? For example, a Smart Phone?

8. Oliver (13 yrs): If you could take one thing from home into space, to make life more fun what would you take and why?

9. Zak (17 yrs): What is it like to wake up and see the earth from space

10. Julia (15 yrs): How long have you been in space for?

Watch the That’s TV Solent interview with Alex Ayling from Mary Hare School
https://twitter.com/TTVSolent/status/1440952287883632641

Deaf pupils to talk to astronaut on the International Space Station in a world first
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2021/september/deaf-pupils-to-talk-to-astronauts.htm

Reading Chronicle newspaper report on the planned contact
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19582950.deaf-newbury-pupils-talk-astronauts-iss-space-station/

The latest information on the ARISS operation mode can be found at
https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.html

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Free UK amateur radio Online Training course https://essexham.co.uk/train/foundation-online/

UK school to contact the ISS using amateur radio

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

At 11:12:33 GMT on Tuesday, October 12, students at Newbury’s Mary Hare School for deaf children will be using amateur radio to talk to astronaut Mark Vande Hei KG5GNP aboard the International Space Station (ISS).

Mark will be using the ISS callsign NA1SS and Mary Hare School GB4MHN. The contact should be receiveable across the UK and Europe on a frequency of 145.800 MHz FM.

Watch the That’s TV Solent interview with Alex Ayling from Mary Hare School
https://twitter.com/TTVSolent/status/1440952287883632641

Deaf pupils to talk to astronaut on the International Space Station in a world first
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2021/september/deaf-pupils-to-talk-to-astronauts.htm

Reading Chronicle newspaper report on the planned contact
https://www.readingchronicle.co.uk/news/19582950.deaf-newbury-pupils-talk-astronauts-iss-space-station/

The latest information on the ARISS operation mode can be found at
https://www.ariss.org/current-status-of-iss-stations.html

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Free UK amateur radio Online Training course https://essexham.co.uk/train/foundation-online/

ISS repeater remaining on until after Field Day

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoThe International Space Station crossband FM repeater should remain active until after the Field Day weekend of June 26-27.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has decided to keep its ARISS InterOperable Radio System (IORS) in crossband repeater mode until after ARRL Field Day ends. The IORS ham station is located in the Columbus Module of the International Space Station.

ARRL HQ Contest Program Manager Paul Bourque, N1SFE, has confirmed that successful radio contacts made through the ARISS IORS, in crossband repeater mode, will count for an ARRL Field Day QSO point, but also for Field Day bonus points! Another fun opportunity for points. Don’t forget the rule limiting stations to 1 QSO per any single channel FM satellite.

On-orbit astronauts always have very busy schedules, but if a voice contact were to be made with them, it would count for QSO credit but not for satellite bonus points. Only an ARISS crossband repeater QSO qualifies for the bonus. Crossband repeater contacts are also valid for AMSAT Field Day for satellite operations, held concurrently with the ARRL event.

Frequencies for ARISS crossband repeater operation are as follows: 145.990 MHz up, 67 Hz tone and 437.800 MHz down. If you haven’t used the ISS repeater yet, be sure to practice with it before Field Day (June 26-27, 2021). These contacts can be tricky, but hams can practice right now…can you do it?

ARISS had planned a mode switch to APRS packet during the second week of June. Now, ARISS is targeting the switch by the astronauts to packet after the first ARISS school contact following ARRL Field Day. In more news for ARISS supporters: the astronauts will power down the ARISS radio station during USA spacewalks on June 16 and June 20, 2021.

ARISS – Celebrating 20 Years of Amateur Radio Continuous Operations on the ISS
https://ariss.org/

ISS Slow Scan TV event 145.800 MHz FM

ISS SSTV image received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

ISS SSTV image received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

An ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) event is scheduled from the International Space Station (ISS) for December 24-31.

This will be a special SSTV event to celebrate the 20th anniversary of ARISS operations on the ISS.

The event is scheduled to begin on December 24 from 16:40 GMT and continue until December 31 ending at 18:15 GMT. Dates and times subject to change due to ISS operational adjustments.

Images will be transmitted on 145.800 MHz FM +/- 3 kHz Doppler shift and the expected SSTV mode of operation is PD 120.

If your radio has selectable FM filters then for best results try selecting the wider filter designed for 25 kHz channel spacing.

ARISS SSTV Blog http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Post and view images on the ARISS SSTV Gallery https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

ARISS SSTV Award: After your image is posted at the gallery, you can acquire a special award by linking to https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ and follow directions for submitting a digital copy of your received image.

ISS SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) https://www.ariss.org/