King’s High School ARISS contact on BBC TV

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact – image credit KHS

On April 19 student Eleanor Griffin led the live question and answer session between King’s High School and Warwick Preparatory School (GB4KHS) and astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU on the International Space Station (NA1SS).

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact – image credit KHS

King’s High School strongly encourage their girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of their girls, Eleanor Griffin, to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

When Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: “The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?”

After the ISS contact when asked what this incredible experience had taught her Eleanor replied “Just do it! No one is going to stop you, if you just go and pursue your dreams, you really can do anything.”

Watch the BBC TV news item broadcast on Midlands Today @bbcmtd. Fast forward to 18:45 into the recording at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09z9tw6/midlands-today-evening-news-19042018

In this video the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact, followed at 12:11 by a presentation by ARISS Operations UK team lead Ciaran Morgan M0XTD with the ISS contact commencing at 31:32 into the video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpVc1ikj4pE

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/apply-to-host-an-ariss-contact.html
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

ISS amateur radio link-up for UK school

Kings High School Warwick ARISS ContactA contact between Kings High School for Girls in Warwick using the call sign GB4KHS and the International Space Station, call sign NA1SS, is planned for Thursday, April 19 at 1205 GMT (1305 BST). The amateur radio contact should be receivable across the British Isles and Western Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

There will be live streaming from the school at https://live.ariss.org/
Schedule (times are given in GMT add 1 hour for BST):
1100 Introduction and school presentations
1145 ARISS Operations start
1205 ARISS Contact
1215 Review and wrap up

Kings High School say:

ISS astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU

ISS astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU

We strongly encourage our girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of our girls to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

This student-led initiative has resulted in a whole-school focus on Space Science, both in the classroom – from Engineering to English Literature – as well as co-curricular activities, including our ‘Mars Society.’

To support this programme, we have appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country.

Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station, when pupils from King’s High and Warwick Prep will talk with the astronauts on board.

King’s High And Beyond! – Adventures in Space

John McGuire, Space Scientist in Residence, has joined forces with Stratford Astronomical Society to organise a Stargazing Live event for students and parents of King’s High and Warwick Prep next Friday night. They will enjoy an Introduction to Astronomy, Telescope Talks, and ‘Ask an Astronomer’ sessions, before viewing the skies for themselves. This follows months of Space activity, from the very youngest pupils of Warwick Prep creating Mars models, to King’s students developing their own Amateur Radio Licensing Club, to set up a link between King’s and the International Space Station.

Live Link-Up to the International Space Station

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoWhen King’s High student, Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: ‘The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents’. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?’ She will lead students in a live Q and A session with astronauts on the International Space Station on 19 April – the actual date depends on where the ISS is in orbit at the time.

From one girl’s interests and ambitions, a generation of King’s High and Warwick Prep pupils will benefit from an extraordinary range of opportunities and life-experience. We are also delighted that pupils from other local schools will be able to share in the excitement, by joining us for a ‘Space Day’ and the link-up itself. All power to our pupils!

The exciting journey pupils take at King’s High has expanded to a whole new dimension this academic year, as we explore the wonders of Space Science, with students from across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation. At King’s, pupils have studied Space in lessons, from Engineering to English Literature, and developed a programme of student-led activities, including Space Blogs, an Astro-Photography competition, and a Space-themed dinner.

We recently appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country. Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station in April, when pupils from Warwick Prep and King’s High will talk with the astronauts on board.

There will be a live web stream from the event at https://live.ariss.org/

If you don’t have an amateur radio receiver you can still listen to the ISS by using an Online Radio, also known as a WebSDR. Select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• Farnham WebSDR when ISS is in range of London http://farnham-sdr.com/

Check the ISS Fan Club site to see when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/
How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a UK amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://ariss.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

New ham radio equipment for ISS

ARISS 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 - Credit John Brier KG4AKV

ARISS 25 watt JVC-Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 – Credit John Brier KG4AKV

The ARISS website reports on progress towards flying new amateur radio equipment to the International Space Station.

On behalf of the ARISS International team, I am proud to announce that on Friday September 29th the ARISS team submitted the InterOperable Radio System (IORS) Safety Data Package to NASA for review!  Our next step in this process is the Safety Review, which is planned for November 2.

Submitting this was a phenomenal accomplishment!!  Particularly since the entire Safety Data Package was developed exclusively by our ARISS volunteers—something we have never done before.  Prior to this submittal, all safety packages—from Owen Garriott’s in the early 1980s to today–were developed with contractors from NASA, ESA or Energia.  And might I say at substantial expense.  I am pleased that the ARISS team did it ourselves!

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

Why is this important?  Two reasons:

1) This is a very major IORS milestone. We cannot get to orbit without successfully completing the safety review process and getting our hardware certified for flight.
2) Developing the safety package exclusively with volunteers is an innovative and gutsy approach to keep costs down and get the hardware flown sooner.  Otherwise we probably would have to slip launch 1-2 years while we acquired additional funding to get this done.

NASA Human Spaceflight Safety Certification is a four-step process—Phase 0, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.  The material we submitted covers the first three of the four phases.  As part of Phases 0, 1 and 2, we need to make sure NASA understands our design.  And we need to show NASA that we understand all the potential hazards that our hardware systems could introduce to ISS and how we have mitigated (or prevented) these hazards.  One example is to demonstrate to NASA that our IORS was designed with electrical wiring and circuit breakers that possess adequate features and sufficient margin to prevent an electrical shock or fire on-board the ISS.  Critically important stuff!  The final phase (Phase 3) will be complete when we have completed all testing and NASA inspection of our flight hardware and NASA deems it flight worthy.  At that point the IORS will be flight certificated and we can fly!  Currently we are looking to March-May 2018 for flight readiness.

For those not following ARISS hardware development very closely, we are developing the IORS to replace most of the on-board radio hardware. It is called “interoperable” because it is being designed to be operated anywhere on ISS.  But specifically, it will be used in the two areas with ISS Ham legacy antennas: the Columbus Module and the Russian Service Module. Interoperability allows us to leverage existing ISS power cables, it can be moved between modules in the event of on-orbit failures, and it supports common training and operations.

Multi-Voltage Power Supply with JVC-Kenwood D710GA on mounting bracket

The IORS is the most complex in-cabin hardware system we have ever designed, built, tested and flown as a volunteer team. We will remove the 3 watt Ericsson handheld radio system, initially certified for flight in 1999, and the Packet module–both of which have recently had issues—and install a brand-new, specially modified 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA radio to enable a multitude of new or improved capabilities on ISS, including voice repeater and better APRS operations.  A key development is the Multi-Voltage Power Supply (MVPS), which interfaces with multiple electric outlet connection types on ISS and provides a multitude of power output capabilities for our current and future ARISS operations and amateur radio experimentation.  It will also allow our Ham Video system to have a dedicated power outlet, eliminating the outlet sharing we have now, which shuts down Ham Video at times.

This effort would not be possible without the dedication and persistence of our IORS development team of volunteers.  They have been working tirelessly behind the scenes to provide an outstanding amateur radio experience for all.  Our IORS development team includes: Lou McFadin, W5DID, our Chief Engineer; Kerry Banke, N6IZW, the MVPS lead designer; Bob Davis, KF4KSS, the MVPS Mechanical enclosure designer; Ed Krome, K9EK, supporting IORS thermal control and cabin noise dissipation; Dave Taylor, W8AAS, our JVC Kenwood D-710 development liaison; Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, our APRS and D-710 operations expert; Shin Aota, JL1IBD, and Phil Parton, N4DRO for all their phenomenal support from JVC Kenwood; Kenneth Ransom, N5VHO, our operations lead; and our safety package team—Ken Ernandes, N2WWD, and Gordon Scannell, KD8COJ.  Kudos to all on a fantastic effort!

Designing, building and testing the IORS is a huge undertaking and *very* expensive.  We need to build ten (10!) units to support flight hardware, flight spares, testing, and training across the international team.  Hardware parts, development tools, fabrication, testing, and expenses to certify the IORS are expected to cost approximately $150,000.  And the hard part (i.e. most expensive part) is just now starting.  So please consider making a donation to ARISS to take our hardware system from dream to reality.  You can donate to ARISS directly through the AMSAT web site at:  http://www.ariss.org/donate.html.  ALL donations go directly to ARISS.

Thank you for all your support to inspire, engage and educate our youth to consider wireless communications and amateur radio, and to pursue STEAM careers through our exciting human space exploration and amateur radio endeavor!

Ad Astra!  To the Stars!

Sincerely,
Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair and ISS Ham Radio Principal Investigator

Source http://ariss.org/

Successful ARISS contact with YOTA 2017

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV - Credit UHF Satcom

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on ISS HamTV – Credit UHF Satcom

Young radio amateurs at the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event at Gilwell Park made contact with astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA on the International Space Station.

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

The first session took place when the ISS came above the horizon at 18:37 GMT (7:37 pm BST) on Tuesday, August 8. The HamTV Digital Amateur Television pictures on 2395 MHz were successfully received and participants were able to see Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA floating in the Columbus module of the ISS. Paolo, operating with the call sign NA1SS, was able to receive the transmission from the YOTA station GB4YOTA but there seemed to be an issue with the 145.800 MHz Ericsson transceiver on the ISS and Paolo’s voice transmissions could not be heard.

The second session took place during the next orbital pass at 20:15 GMT (9:15 pm BST). For this session Paolo operated the amateur radio station (Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver) located in the Russian Service Module.

The transmission was heard loud and clear at Gilwell Park and the young radio amateurs were able to ask Paolo their questions.

Watch a short video showing the setting up of the ARISS ground station
and the Space Station contacts

Watch the full length video of the  event. Fast forward to 2:34:00 for the 145.800 MHz FM contact

A list of the questions the YOTA participants asked is at
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/08/03/ariss-contact-yota-2017/

Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Press Release YOTA 2017 Gilwell Park – PDF download here

You can listen to the ISS using an Online Radio. When Voice or Slow Scan TV transmissions are planned select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM. For the more frequent Packet Radio transmissions select a Frequency of 145825.0 kHz and Mode FM.
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia
Check the ISS Fan Club site to see current status and when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Space Station contact planned for YOTA 2017

Carlos Eavis G3VHF operating the ARISS station GB4YOTA at Gilwell Park, UK

Carlos Eavis G3VHF operating the ARISS station GB4YOTA at Gilwell Park, UK

An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) contact is planned between astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, using the call sign NA1SS and the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event, call sign GB4YOTA, taking place in Gilwell Park, UK.

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

The ARISS contact is scheduled Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at approximately 18:37 GMT (7:37 pm BST). This will be a direct radio contact, operated by GB4YOTA.

Downlink signals will be audible in the British Isles and parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM. The signal should be receivable on a handheld radio with 1/4 wave whip antenna, see
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA will also be operating the HamVideo Digital Television transmitter on 2395 MHz.

The Goonhilly receiver will be activated sometime Friday, August 4, and will remain active over the weekend and continue to track the ISS until Wednesday morning, August 9. Goonhilly, will be one of several European HamTV reception ground stations contributing to the reception of the HamTV signal for the contact itself.

Two web streams will be available:

1. The normal ARISS/BATC website will be available at https://ariss.batc.tv/hamtv This shows only the HamTV video downlink as an output from the merger facility, with an indication of which registered HamTV stations are providing signal input to the merger.

2. The ARISS Operations UK Team will be web streaming from the YOTA event itself at https://ariss.batc.tv/ This web stream includes introductions and presentations from the RSGB and the YOTA participants before the actual contact itself according to the timetable of the event below.

The timetable of the event is as follows. ALL times are GMT times:

17:30 – All participants and guests to be present at the location. The event web stream (https://ariss.batc.tv/) will start at approximately this time to capture some of the build-up.

17:40 – Formal start of the RSGB/YOTA introductions and presentations.

18:20 – ARISS Operations in the UK take over the event, give the background to what is happening, how it is organised and how all the different elements of the contact are managed.

18:38 – Scheduled time for start of contact with Nespoli operating as NA1SS. The YOTA participants will be using the GB4YOTA callsign.

18:50 – Approximate end of contact with Nespoli. After closing the contact, the operator will invite RSGB/YOTA to formally close down the ARISS event.

YOTA_UK_2017YOTA Information:

The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event happens every summer and offers a week-long range of wireless technology activities to 80 young people under the age of 26. The youngsters are all representing their national amateur radio societies and come from 28 countries located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, northern Asia, Africa and the Middle East). This year there will also be a visiting team from Japan.

The 2017 event takes place in the UK at Gilwell Park, the home of the Scouting movement, and includes a special event station GB17YOTA, a transceiver kit building workshop, some antenna building, an Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) contest and a Summits on the Air (SOTA) activation. The youngsters will be visiting Bletchley Park, the home of the Enigma code breakers, the National Radio Centre, and the Science Museum in London.

Because the event is taking place at the home of Scouting, there will be around 1000 Scouts on site and we hope to have some of them join us for the ISS contact.

Special callsign GB4YOTA will also be activated by ARISS for a special contact with one of the astronauts on board the International Space Station.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Do any of you experiment with ham radio in your free time when you are not obligated to work up there?

2. Typically, how many ham-radio operators are there on the ISS?

3. For ARISS contacts, what frequency bands, and how much power is used to communicate with the ground stations?

4. What are some of the challenges with sending live HD video from space?

5. How important do you consider your interest in amateur radio to your set of technical skills?

6. What would you say to encourage YOTA attendees to continue with their interest in radio?

7. How important is the amateur radio/ham radio setup to ISS backup communications?

8. How do you maintain communications with the worldwide mission control centres?

9. How many different types of communication systems does the ISS have?

10. (ONLY IF HAMTV IS ACTIVE) Can you show us your favourite trick with a water droplet?

11. Do you experience any ionizing phenomena in space that affects the wave propagation in a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE way?

12. When using amateur radio/ham communication equipment in space, what kind of problems can cause difficulties How are these resolved?

13. We are talking via voice (and video?). Can you use other modes, such as straight CW-keys onboard the ISS?

14. What are the main differences between a contact with a ham ground station and a space agency ground station?

15. What are the differences between the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) camera and HamTV?”

16. How many cargo supply ships are docked with the ISS at the moment and do they change the pattern of earth facing communications?”

17. How do you see the ham radio system developing in the next decade?

18. Does everything go according to plan or do parts break and need replacement. If so, do you have a repair facility on board?

19. In space, can you use social media and messaging with others in the same way we use it on Earth?

20. How does the oxygen and electricity production work on board of a spaceship?

21. In which direction do plants grow onboard the space station?

22. What do you do in case of a fire onboard the ISS?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the volunteer support and leadership from AMSAT and IARU societies around the world with the ISS space agencies partners: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

Source Gaston Bertels ON4WF ARISS Europe

Event webstream https://ariss.batc.tv/

Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Press Release YOTA 2017 Gilwell Park – PDF download here

You can listen to the ISS using an Online Radio – Select Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia
Check the ISS Fan Club site to see when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Press reports ISS success of Chertsey Radio Club

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The Surrey press report radio amateurs at the Chertsey Radio Club received test transmissions by two satellites inside the International Space Station (ISS). The club also received ISS Slow Scan Television images.

On July 5, the Space Station sent greeting messages in Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese, which were picked up by club members. The messages were sent during test transmissions from two small educational Russian amateur radio satellites, known as Tanusha-1 and Tanusha-2. They will be deployed from the ISS during a spacewalk in August.

As part of the celebrations for the 20th Anniversary of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), the ISS sent a set of 12 images using slow scan television (SSTV). The transmissions took place over four days from July 20.

Chertsey Radio Club member James Preece M0JFP was able to receive the signal and convert them into images using a Raspberry Pi 3.

Read the article at
http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/surrey-radio-enthusiasts-make-contact-13396651

Chertsey Radio Club ISS SSTV on Raspberry Pi
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-decoded-on-raspberry-pi3.html
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-0058-uk-celebrating-20-years.html

Follow Chertsey Radio Club https://twitter.com/chertseyRC

Summer is a great time to get publicity for amateur radio
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/june/summer-is-a-great-time-to-get-publicity-for-ham-radio.htm

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/