ARISS contact planned for Rowan Preparatory School UK

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Nick Hague KG5TMV with participants at Rowan Preparatory School, Claygate, Surrey, United Kingdom.

The direct contact between NA1SS and GB4RPS is planned for 1:48:55 PM BST (12:48:55 GMT) on Thursday, June 20, 2019 and the downlink signals will be audible in the UK and parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

Live streaming of the event is expected at https://live.ariss.org/

You can receive the ISS signal online from anywhere in the world by using the Farnham WebSDR at http://farnham-sdr.com/

School presentation

Rowan Preparatory School is a vibrant, friendly and nurturing community where girls are encouraged to be themselves. Our school is an independent preparatory school for girls between the ages of 2 to 11, located in the heart of Claygate (near Esher) in Surrey. A school with traditional values and a forward thinking approach to education, we seek to offer a broad and adventurous curriculum full of exciting opportunities.

School life at Rowan is inspiring and offers a breadth of experiences which develop the whole child. The warmth that is evident when you walk through the door at Rowan creates the ideal learning environment for girls to fulfil their potential. They are nurtured and allowed to grow as individuals, encouraged to take risks and have a go at new skills and interests which will enrich their lives. Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths are at the heart of the curriculum at Rowan. Girls make the most of our dedicated specialist teaching spaces and delight in practical learning opportunities in the Engineering and Technology suite. From 3D printers to our radio recording studio, the environment at Rowan is geared towards encouraging creative and exciting learning, ensuring that the girls explore, question and discover in every area of learning. We are passionate about bringing STEM subjects to life and encouraging the girls to see how these subjects translate into the world beyond school. Experiences which will foster successful and inspirational women of the future!

Rowan girls are prepared for the transition to a wide range of successful day and boarding schools and we pride ourselves on finding the right senior school environment for each and every girl. A personalised approach to learning and outstanding pastoral care in our happy environment, ensures that every girl develops a genuine love of learning.

Students Questions:

1. Sophia (Yr 1): How did the International Space Station get built when it just balances in the air?

2. Izzy (Yr 2): What are the challenges to growing food in space if astronauts are to stay in space for longer?

3. Emily (Yr 3): Does your digestion change because in space there is no gravity so your intestine will float in your body?

4. Ashley (Yr 4): Of all the experiments that you have done in space, what has given the most surprising result or has been the most exciting?

5. Alessi (Yr 5): If you spin a ball in the ISS will it keep spinning or will it stop, and if it stops, what stops it?

6. Alannah: (Yr 6): In the future, will it be possible that someone can spend their entire life in space and if so, would their life expectancy change?

7. Grace (Yr 2): If you do a handstand in space does your blood go to your head if there is no gravity?

8. Delilah (Yr 4): Is there anything you could learn about how bacteria and viruses behave in space that could help us defeat infectious bugs around the Earth?

9. Emilia (Yr 5): NASA have said that they will establish a permanent presence on the moon within the next decade, how will they do this and what is the most exciting benefit for human kind?

10. Anya (Yr 6): In all of your time spent on board the ISS, what is the most exciting and extraordinary thing that you have experienced?

11. Sophia saying Zoe’s question (Yr 1): What new information about space are you hoping to learn?

12. Izzy saying Ballie’s question (Yr 2): Can you escape from a black hole?

13. Emily saying Eloise’s question (Yr 3): We have learnt that astronauts are very busy and work long hours. So when you have free time, what do you do for fun?

14. Ashley saying Annabel’s question (Yr 4): How do you get rid of rubbish in space?

15. Alessi saying Sabine’s question (Yr 5): What are you looking forward to the most in nature when you return?

16. Alannah saying Lucy’s question (Yr 6): Our teachers and parents tell us that having a balanced diet is important. Is your diet closely monitored or do you have freedom to choose what you eat? What is your favourite meal?

17. Grace saying Olivia’s question (Yr 1): How do you sleep in space?

18. Delilah saying Amelia’s question (Yr 3): What kind of dangers might you experience in space?

19. Emilia saying Luna’s question (Yr 2): What is the most beautiful thing you can see in space?

20. Anya saying 4J’s question (Yr 4): We have heard that some people don’t believe that the Moon landing took place, what is the best evidence that we have to disprove this theory?

About ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crew members on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crew members on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio.

For more information, see http://www.ariss.org/

How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

ARISS SSTV transmissions April 11-14

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ARISS Russia is planning Slow Scan Television (SSTV) image transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM from the International Space Station.

UPDATE April 12: Transmissions on Thursday and Friday, April 11/12 had very low audio. Dmitry R4UAB reports the ISS cosmonauts plan to try to fix the issue on Saturday, April 13.

The transmissions begin Thursday, April 11, 2019 around 18:00 UTC and run continuously until approximately 18:00 UTC on Sunday, April 14, 2019.

This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.

Once the event begins the transmissions will be broadcast at 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Ham radio operators and other radio enthusiasts are invited to post the images they receive at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Moreover, on request, ARISS SSTV Award Manager Slawek SQ3OOK will provide an SSTV Award, details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

To submit a request, please follow this procedure:

1. Load your decoded images at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/submit.php

2. Fill in the application form on the website https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and is subject to change at any time.

Please check the following for news and the most current information
AMSAT-BB https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/amsat-bb
ARISS https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
ISS Ham https://twitter.com/RF2Space

You can use online radios to receive signals from the International Space Station:
• SUWS WebSDR located Farnham near London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR located European Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

ISS SSTV links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ARISS Slow Scan TV Event Feb 15-17

NOTA ISS SSTV image received in Elgin by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL February 10, 2019

NOTA ISS SSTV image received in Elgin by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL February 10, 2019

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. Transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 15 at 08:45 UT and run through Sunday, Feb. 17 at 17:25 UT.

SSTV operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS at the frequency of 145.800 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120 and can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band. After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php . In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ .

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the ARISS Twitter feed @ARISS_status or the AMSAT Bulletin Board

The SSTV images will be transmitted in PD-120 on 145.800 MHz FM using the Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver located in the Russian ISS Service module.

Note the ISS transmissions use the 5 kHz deviation FM standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try using the wider filter. Handheld transceivers generally have a single wide filter fitted as standard and you should get good results outdoors using just a 1/4 wave whip antenna.

ISS SSTV links for tracking and decoding Apps https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

You can receive the SSTV transmissions by using an Online Radio (WebSDR) and the MMSSTV software:
• Listen to the ISS when it is in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
• Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

Help required in final tests before MarconISSta deinstalled

MarconISSta LogoThe International Space Station MarconISSta experiment will cease on February 9. Martin Buscher DJ1MBB asks radio amateurs with suitable equipment to participate in final tests.

The MarconISSta is a spectrum analyzer payload that monitors parts of the frequency spectrum in VHF, UHF, L and S band from the ISS in order to analyze current use and availability of bands for satellite communication.

Martin Buscher DJ1MBB writes:

We were just informed that it is likely that MarconISSta will be deinstalled on February 9, 2019. This is about three weeks earlier than expected, so we quickly have to finish any outstanding activities. Therefore: All Power To The ISS!

We want to invite everybody who owns a UHF antenna, preferably with an e.i.r.p. of more than 30 dBW, to do transmissions to the ISS. These transmissions will be recorded by MarconISSta and we will publish the results here. This experiment is a nice way for you to test your antennas, while it is great for us and ARISS to evaluate the ARISS VHF/UHF antenna pattern.

Transmission Details:
• Transmission time: Whenever you see the ISS between now and February 9th.
• Frequency: 435-438 MHz. Please avoid 435.95 MHz (our reference frequency) and 436.5 MHz (center frequency of receiver)
• Power: Continuous transmission of carrier, we recommend an e.i.r.p. of more than 30 dBW

Please do not use Doppler correction. We want to see the Doppler shift, it might help us to localize your transmission from this.

Further information https://marconissta.com/2019/02/05/urgent-call-all-power-to-the-iss/

ARISS/NOTA ISS Slow Scan TV Event Feb 8-10

NOTA ISS SSTV image received by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL February 10, 2019

NOTA ISS SSTV image received by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL in Elgin on February 10, 2019

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. International Space Station (ISS) transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 14:00 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC on 145.800 MHz FM with the SSTV mode likely to be PD120.

Update Feb. 9: SSTV transmissions on Friday were at very low power, however, full power was restored on Saturday afternoon.

Among the radio amateurs receiving the pictures was Laura M6LHT who with Jenny will be using them to show students as part of the Music Man Project – Twitter @MusicManProject

Laura M6LHT and Jenny receiving ISS SSTV pictures

Laura M6LHT and Jenny receiving ISS SSTV pictures

ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS on the frequency of 145.800 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120.

They can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band.

After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.

Music Man Project - Music is Magic in Spacet

Music Man Project – Music is Magic in Spacet

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the ARISS Twitter feed @ARISS_status or the AMSAT Bulletin Board

You can receive the pictures from the ISS by using the MMSSTV software and an Online Radio (WebSDR). Select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• Farnham WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

Check the N2YO site to see when the ISS is in range https://n2yo.com/?s=25544&df=1

ISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) hints and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Complete set of SSTV pictures received from the ISS by DK3WN Feb 8-10, 2019

Complete set of SSTV pictures received from the ISS by DK3WN Feb 8-10, 2019

Kenilworth students’ amateur radio contact with space station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

This is the high definition video feed from the live contact between the Kenilworth School and Sixth Form GB4KSN and astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT onboard the International Space Station NA1SS on Friday, December 14, 2018.

The event starts with a brief introduction from the head teacher, Mr Hayden Abbott, before the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact.

ARISS Operations UK team lead takes over at approximately 12 minutes and leads the audience into the contact which occurs at approximately 58:05 minutes into the video.

Watch the video of the event

Kenilworth school ARISS contact
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2018/december/ariss-event-1412.htm

ARISS http://www.ariss-eu.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status