ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, Warwickshire

Dr Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Dr. Serena M. Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

The event is scheduled Friday, December 14, 2018 at approximately 1255 GMT with live streaming starting from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM and can be received on your phone or tablet via the Farnham WebSDR

School Information:

Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year’s GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood – Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

GB4KSN antenna mast

GB4KSN antenna mast

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that “space” smells very metallic. Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station. What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you’re moving when you’re on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What’s your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAbout ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/ 

73, Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

How to hear the ISS, with an amateur radio transceiver, scanner or by listening online on your phone or tablet via a WebSDR https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

The event will be streamed live from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

ARISS and Amateur Radio in Raspberry Pi magazine article

Students programming the Astro Pi computers Credit: UK Space Agency (Max Alexander)

Radio amateur Dave Honess M6DNT is interviewed in the popular Raspberry Pi magazine MagPi about “Taking Education to the Stars”.

The article, on pages 84/85 of issue 75 November 2018 MagPi, covers the educational role of the two Astro Pi units on the International Space Station.

Dave mentions Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS and the work of ARISS – Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, saying:

“Radio remains the only way to communicate with all our spacecraft throughout the solar system, and organisations like ARISS and local HAM radio clubs are, in my opinion, becoming more and more necessary to attract new talent.”

Download the Free PDF of MagPi magazine from
https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi-issues/MagPi75.pdf

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

David Honess M6DNT with both ISS Astro Pi computers

In 2017 Dave Honess M6DNT and Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS were inducted into the prestigious CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame for their educational work in the ISS Astro Pi program and ARISS, Dave said:
“I was really surprised when I heard I’d been inducted into the Hall of Fame, especially alongside Tim! Thank you to CQ magazine for the honour.”

https://amsat-uk.org/2017/05/19/cq-mag-honors-astro-pi-britons/

Since March 2018 Dave Honess M6DNT has been working at ESA ESTEC (European Space Research and Technology Centre) in the Netherlands where he is ISS and International Education Operations Coordinator
https://twitter.com/dave_spice

ARISS http://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

ARISS Joins NASA On-The-Air for a Special SSTV Event

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

ISS SSTV image received by John Brier KG4AKV October 27, 2018

Amateur Radio On The International Space Station (ARISS) is planning a very special Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event from about 1000 UT Saturday, Oct. 27 until 1930 UT Monday, Oct. 29 on 145.800 MHz FM using PD-120.

UPDATE 0930 GMT Oct. 28: SSTV pictures were sent from the ISS on Saturday, the session ended early in the afternoon. Transmissions resumed early Sunday morning.

Helping to support the event will be NASA’s Space, Communication and Navigation (SCaN) Department.

The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) program manages NASA’s three most important communications networks: The Space Network (SN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Deep Space Network (DSN).

Just as in past ARISS SSTV commemorations, twelve images will be downlinked, but this time with six featuring the SCaN educational activities while the other six images will commemorate major NASA anniversaries, ie., when NASA was established, astronauts first landing on the moon, etc.

In addition to the fun of receiving these images, participants can qualify for a special endorsement for the NASA On The Air (NOTA) celebration event. To learn more about NOTA visit https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/

Once received, images can be posted and viewed at
http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

The transmissions are expected to be broadcast at the usual frequency of 145.800 MHz using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

Source AMSAT News Service

Note the ISS transmissions use the 5 kHz deviation FM standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try using the wider filter. Handheld transceivers generally have a single wide filter fitted as standard and you should get good results outdoors using just a 1/4 wave whip antenna.

ISS SSTV links for tracking and decoding Apps
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

You can receive the SSTV transmissions by using an Online Radio (WebSDR) and the MMSSTV software:
• Listen to the ISS when it is in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://farnham-sdr.com/
• Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

ISS Fan Club – Tracking / Predictions http://www.issfanclub.com/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release for anyone to download and adapt, see http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

An example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/

King’s High School ARISS contact on BBC TV

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford from BBC TV interviewing Eleanor Griffin before the ARISS contact – image credit KHS

On April 19 student Eleanor Griffin led the live question and answer session between King’s High School and Warwick Preparatory School (GB4KHS) and astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU on the International Space Station (NA1SS).

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact - image credit KHS

Nicola Beckford reporting for BBC Midlands TV on Kings High School ARISS contact – image credit KHS

King’s High School strongly encourage their girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of their girls, Eleanor Griffin, to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

When Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: “The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?”

After the ISS contact when asked what this incredible experience had taught her Eleanor replied “Just do it! No one is going to stop you, if you just go and pursue your dreams, you really can do anything.”

Watch the BBC TV news item broadcast on Midlands Today @bbcmtd. Fast forward to 18:45 into the recording at
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09z9tw6/midlands-today-evening-news-19042018

In this video the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact, followed at 12:11 by a presentation by ARISS Operations UK team lead Ciaran Morgan M0XTD with the ISS contact commencing at 31:32 into the video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HpVc1ikj4pE

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/apply-to-host-an-ariss-contact.html
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

ISS amateur radio link-up for UK school

Kings High School Warwick ARISS ContactA contact between Kings High School for Girls in Warwick using the call sign GB4KHS and the International Space Station, call sign NA1SS, is planned for Thursday, April 19 at 1205 GMT (1305 BST). The amateur radio contact should be receivable across the British Isles and Western Europe on 145.800 MHz FM.

There will be live streaming from the school at https://live.ariss.org/
Schedule (times are given in GMT add 1 hour for BST):
1100 Introduction and school presentations
1145 ARISS Operations start
1205 ARISS Contact
1215 Review and wrap up

Kings High School say:

ISS astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU

ISS astronaut Ricky Arnold KE5DAU

We strongly encourage our girls to develop their interests both inside and outside the classroom. This culture of empowerment led one of our girls to apply to ARISS Europe (Amateur Radio on the International Space Station) for a highly prestigious link-up to the International Space Station.

This student-led initiative has resulted in a whole-school focus on Space Science, both in the classroom – from Engineering to English Literature – as well as co-curricular activities, including our ‘Mars Society.’

To support this programme, we have appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country.

Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station, when pupils from King’s High and Warwick Prep will talk with the astronauts on board.

King’s High And Beyond! – Adventures in Space

John McGuire, Space Scientist in Residence, has joined forces with Stratford Astronomical Society to organise a Stargazing Live event for students and parents of King’s High and Warwick Prep next Friday night. They will enjoy an Introduction to Astronomy, Telescope Talks, and ‘Ask an Astronomer’ sessions, before viewing the skies for themselves. This follows months of Space activity, from the very youngest pupils of Warwick Prep creating Mars models, to King’s students developing their own Amateur Radio Licensing Club, to set up a link between King’s and the International Space Station.

Live Link-Up to the International Space Station

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoWhen King’s High student, Eleanor Griffin was selected to hold a space conversation with an astronaut, she was inspired to set up the Warwick Mars Project, for students across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation, to further interest in Space Science. Eleanor says: ‘The moon landings belong to the generation of our grandparents, and the International Space Station to our parents’. What will happen in our generation? Will Mankind travel to another planet?’ She will lead students in a live Q and A session with astronauts on the International Space Station on 19 April – the actual date depends on where the ISS is in orbit at the time.

From one girl’s interests and ambitions, a generation of King’s High and Warwick Prep pupils will benefit from an extraordinary range of opportunities and life-experience. We are also delighted that pupils from other local schools will be able to share in the excitement, by joining us for a ‘Space Day’ and the link-up itself. All power to our pupils!

The exciting journey pupils take at King’s High has expanded to a whole new dimension this academic year, as we explore the wonders of Space Science, with students from across the Warwick Independent Schools Foundation. At King’s, pupils have studied Space in lessons, from Engineering to English Literature, and developed a programme of student-led activities, including Space Blogs, an Astro-Photography competition, and a Space-themed dinner.

We recently appointed our own Space Scientist in Residence – a unique position, we believe, for any school in the country. Excitement is building for our live link-up to the International Space Station in April, when pupils from Warwick Prep and King’s High will talk with the astronauts on board.

There will be a live web stream from the event at https://live.ariss.org/

If you don’t have an amateur radio receiver you can still listen to the ISS by using an Online Radio, also known as a WebSDR. Select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• Farnham WebSDR when ISS is in range of London http://farnham-sdr.com/

Check the ISS Fan Club site to see when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/
How to hear the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a UK amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://ariss.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

King’s High School Warwick https://twitter.com/KHSWarwick

New ham radio equipment for ISS

ARISS 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 - Credit John Brier KG4AKV

ARISS 25 watt JVC-Kenwood D710GA at Hamvention 2017 – Credit John Brier KG4AKV

The ARISS website reports on progress towards flying new amateur radio equipment to the International Space Station.

On behalf of the ARISS International team, I am proud to announce that on Friday September 29th the ARISS team submitted the InterOperable Radio System (IORS) Safety Data Package to NASA for review!  Our next step in this process is the Safety Review, which is planned for November 2.

Submitting this was a phenomenal accomplishment!!  Particularly since the entire Safety Data Package was developed exclusively by our ARISS volunteers—something we have never done before.  Prior to this submittal, all safety packages—from Owen Garriott’s in the early 1980s to today–were developed with contractors from NASA, ESA or Energia.  And might I say at substantial expense.  I am pleased that the ARISS team did it ourselves!

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

Why is this important?  Two reasons:

1) This is a very major IORS milestone. We cannot get to orbit without successfully completing the safety review process and getting our hardware certified for flight.
2) Developing the safety package exclusively with volunteers is an innovative and gutsy approach to keep costs down and get the hardware flown sooner.  Otherwise we probably would have to slip launch 1-2 years while we acquired additional funding to get this done.

NASA Human Spaceflight Safety Certification is a four-step process—Phase 0, Phase 1, Phase 2 and Phase 3.  The material we submitted covers the first three of the four phases.  As part of Phases 0, 1 and 2, we need to make sure NASA understands our design.  And we need to show NASA that we understand all the potential hazards that our hardware systems could introduce to ISS and how we have mitigated (or prevented) these hazards.  One example is to demonstrate to NASA that our IORS was designed with electrical wiring and circuit breakers that possess adequate features and sufficient margin to prevent an electrical shock or fire on-board the ISS.  Critically important stuff!  The final phase (Phase 3) will be complete when we have completed all testing and NASA inspection of our flight hardware and NASA deems it flight worthy.  At that point the IORS will be flight certificated and we can fly!  Currently we are looking to March-May 2018 for flight readiness.

For those not following ARISS hardware development very closely, we are developing the IORS to replace most of the on-board radio hardware. It is called “interoperable” because it is being designed to be operated anywhere on ISS.  But specifically, it will be used in the two areas with ISS Ham legacy antennas: the Columbus Module and the Russian Service Module. Interoperability allows us to leverage existing ISS power cables, it can be moved between modules in the event of on-orbit failures, and it supports common training and operations.

Multi-Voltage Power Supply with JVC-Kenwood D710GA on mounting bracket

The IORS is the most complex in-cabin hardware system we have ever designed, built, tested and flown as a volunteer team. We will remove the 3 watt Ericsson handheld radio system, initially certified for flight in 1999, and the Packet module–both of which have recently had issues—and install a brand-new, specially modified 25 watt JVC Kenwood D710GA radio to enable a multitude of new or improved capabilities on ISS, including voice repeater and better APRS operations.  A key development is the Multi-Voltage Power Supply (MVPS), which interfaces with multiple electric outlet connection types on ISS and provides a multitude of power output capabilities for our current and future ARISS operations and amateur radio experimentation.  It will also allow our Ham Video system to have a dedicated power outlet, eliminating the outlet sharing we have now, which shuts down Ham Video at times.

This effort would not be possible without the dedication and persistence of our IORS development team of volunteers.  They have been working tirelessly behind the scenes to provide an outstanding amateur radio experience for all.  Our IORS development team includes: Lou McFadin, W5DID, our Chief Engineer; Kerry Banke, N6IZW, the MVPS lead designer; Bob Davis, KF4KSS, the MVPS Mechanical enclosure designer; Ed Krome, K9EK, supporting IORS thermal control and cabin noise dissipation; Dave Taylor, W8AAS, our JVC Kenwood D-710 development liaison; Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, our APRS and D-710 operations expert; Shin Aota, JL1IBD, and Phil Parton, N4DRO for all their phenomenal support from JVC Kenwood; Kenneth Ransom, N5VHO, our operations lead; and our safety package team—Ken Ernandes, N2WWD, and Gordon Scannell, KD8COJ.  Kudos to all on a fantastic effort!

Designing, building and testing the IORS is a huge undertaking and *very* expensive.  We need to build ten (10!) units to support flight hardware, flight spares, testing, and training across the international team.  Hardware parts, development tools, fabrication, testing, and expenses to certify the IORS are expected to cost approximately $150,000.  And the hard part (i.e. most expensive part) is just now starting.  So please consider making a donation to ARISS to take our hardware system from dream to reality.  You can donate to ARISS directly through the AMSAT web site at:  http://www.ariss.org/donate.html.  ALL donations go directly to ARISS.

Thank you for all your support to inspire, engage and educate our youth to consider wireless communications and amateur radio, and to pursue STEAM careers through our exciting human space exploration and amateur radio endeavor!

Ad Astra!  To the Stars!

Sincerely,
Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair and ISS Ham Radio Principal Investigator

Source http://ariss.org/