Winter issue of OSCAR News now available for download

Oscar News issue 224 December 2018

Oscar News issue 224 December 2018

E-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the Winter 2018 edition of OSCAR News here.

The paper edition should be sent to postal members in 2-3 weeks.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• New Editor’s Welcome
• 2018 Meetings & Events calendar
• AMSAT-UK 2018 Colloquium
• JY1Sat First Packet Received
• Meteorwatch
• Things that fall from the sky – 2
• Es’Hail-2 Report
• My Radio Life – part 2
• AO85 back in Operation
• SSO-A Objects
• Using the NO-84 (PSAT) PSK Transponder
• AMSAT-UK Construction Contest 2018
• From Cape Canaveral to a geostationary orbit using the example of Korea-5A
• Minutes of the Annual General Meeting
• Joe Spier, K6WAO visits the RSGB National Radio Centre
• The FUNcube Project – five years since launch
• IARU Frequency Coordination
• Smallsat Express LEOPs report
• We were there at the launch of the Es’Hail-2 satellite!
• The story behind Es’hail-2
• ARISS Joins NASA On-The-Air for a Special SSTV Event

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

Kenilworth students’ amateur radio contact with space station

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

This is the high definition video feed from the live contact between the Kenilworth School and Sixth Form GB4KSN and astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT onboard the International Space Station NA1SS on Friday, December 14, 2018.

The event starts with a brief introduction from the head teacher, Mr Hayden Abbott, before the students present their work and activities that lead up the contact.

ARISS Operations UK team lead takes over at approximately 12 minutes and leads the audience into the contact which occurs at approximately 58:05 minutes into the video.

Watch the video of the event

Kenilworth school ARISS contact
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2018/december/ariss-event-1412.htm

ARISS http://www.ariss-eu.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS inspired 2 million young people

UK PM Theresa May and Tim Peake with some of the young people involved in Principia mission

UK PM Theresa May and Tim Peake with some of the young people involved in Principia mission

A new report has found more than 2 million young people in the UK engaged with education and outreach programmes linked to Tim Peake’s Principia Mission to space. The report highlights the role of ARISS and amateur radio during the mission.

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

The UK Space Agency ran a £3 million education campaign alongside the mission to the International Space Station, which blasted off three years ago tomorrow (15 December), to inspire a greater interest and understanding of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as well as space.

The campaign – the largest and most successful ever organised for a European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut – encompassed 34 separate projects and covered a spectrum of ages and subjects, including mass participation experiments in schools using seeds that had been in space.

The report, produced by the UK Space Agency, found one in three UK schools took part in at least one Principia activity. Every region of the UK ran school activities with all projects accessible to boys and girls. The majority of the 34 projects focused on primary school children although some went right through to university.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoHuman Spaceflight & Microgravity Programme Manager at the UK Space Agency Libby Jackson @LibbyJackson__ tweeted:
This report records my most memorable and most proud of professional achievement. Thank you to each and every one of the amazing team and partner organisations for what we did together along with @spacegovuk, @esa and @astro_timpeake. The impacts will be felt for many years yet.

ARISS-UK Ciaran Morgan @M0XTD tweeted:
Thank you @LibbyJackson__ and to the amazing team at @spacegovuk for choosing @ARISS_status to be part of the #Principia mission. We are proud to have taken part and to have made such an impression with so many students. Looking forward to the future!

Download the full Principia campaign report, or summary education report from
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/on-third-anniversary-of-tim-peakes-space-mission-report-reveals-over-2-million-inspired-by-education-campaign

ARISS Principia https://principia.ariss.org/

ARISS-UK videos of the Principia amateur radio contacts
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQS-yDk7PdE9cRv4MNu8pCw

Post launch updates on the JY1SAT and ESEO missions

JY1SAT (JO-97) CubeSat

JY1SAT (JO-97) CubeSat

JY1SAT (JO-97) carrying the FUNcube-6 amateur radio transponder and ESEO with the FUNcube-4 transponder were launched on December 3, 2018.

JY1SAT – Although not finally confirmed, good tracking results are being obtained using the TLEs for object 2018-99AX / 43803, the 1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon is on 145.840 MHz.

Commissioning of the spacecraft is continuing and there may be some changes to the operating modes over the next couple of weeks. Please continue to let the Data Warehouse have as much data as possible. In that regard, an updated version of the JY1SAT Dashboard (ver 1189) has just been released. This fixes a couple of buggettes relating to Doppler tracking over multiple orbits and the graph displays now no longer start at zero. This update v1189 JY1 Dashboard can be downloaded from https://download.funcube.org.uk/JY1Sat_Dashboard_v1189.msi

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO – In a similar manner to JY1SAT, the official confirmation has not been received, but the best TLEs are currently 2018-99AL / 43792. The 9600 bps downlink signal on 437.00 MHz is quite strong and reports and recordings are welcomed. Please continue to check the https://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO website for the latest updates from ESA.

We can confirm that the AMSAT payload with a downlink on 145.985 MHz has not yet been activated and that DK3WN and EA4GPZ, working with other collaborators, have developed a decoder for the 437.00 MHz downlink signals.

Decoding ESEO https://destevez.net/2018/12/decoding-eseo/

It is hoped that a UI, to show the actual telemetry values, will also be available soon.

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

ARISS contact planned for students in Kenilworth, Warwickshire

Dr Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

Dr. Serena Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT

An International Space Station school contact has been planned for astronaut Dr. Serena M. Auñón-Chancellor KG5TMT with Kenilworth School and Sixth Form, Kenilworth, United Kingdom.

The event is scheduled Friday, December 14, 2018 at approximately 1255 GMT with live streaming starting from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

The conversation will be conducted in English.

The contact will be a direct operated by GB4KSN.

The downlink signals will be audible in parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM and can be received on your phone or tablet via the Farnham WebSDR

School Information:

Kenilworth School and Sixth Form is located in the historic town of Kenilworth in Warwickshire England, we are effectively in the dead centre of England.
The school is made up of 1880 students and just over 200 teaching and support staff.

We are a true comprehensive school meaning that we do not select students on their academic abilities when starting school and teach students with a range of academic abilities. This being said, we are the top performing non selective school in the whole of Warwickshire, Coventry and Solihull based on last year’s GCSE results and have been judged as an Outstanding school by Ofsted and have recently been awarded World Class School status.

The school has a successful and very popular Space, Rocket and Robotics extra-curricular club run by Mr Harwood – Suther. Students have taken part in many activities such as building their own Galilean telescopes, rocket cars and taking part in a number of robotic competitions organised by VEX, as well as taking part in regular stargazing events. We have also been extremely lucky to have hosted samples of moon rock for our students to look at on two occasions.

The school has also been awarded the Space Education Quality Mark (Silver) as well as the Teen Tech Award Centre for Innovation (Silver).

GB4KSN antenna mast

GB4KSN antenna mast

Students First Names & Questions:

1. Max B. (Age 11): What surprised you the most when you entered space?
2. Jacob G. (Age 12): Do you believe there is some form of living extra-terrestrial intelligent lifeforms beyond earth, not just bacteria and fossils?
3. Eva R. (Age 11): During your training would you be able to describe your hardest moment and your most enjoyable experience from your training?
4. George J. (Age 11): How do you find the food in space compared to when you are back on earth?
5. Anya B. (Age 11): When you were a child did you always know you wanted to be an astronaut and fly to space?
6. John T. (Age 13): Where would you prefer to live, on board The ISS or Earth?
7. Elin B. (Age 11): What kind of plant life can be grown on the ISS as there is no oxygen or CO2 in space?
8. Alfie S. (Age 11): Why do liquids when poured out in space, always form round blobs?
9. Freddie B-S. (Age 12): From information that I have read, male astronauts say that “space” smells very metallic. Is it any different for female astronauts in space?
10. Dorottya V. (Age 12): How will it be possible to live on Mars and plant trees, flowers, and create an earth like environment?
11. Sam S. (Age 13): If you are in space, how does the zero gravity make you taller?
12. Clarissa/Elly (Age 12): Is the sunrise brighter than on earth?
13. Simon B. (Age 12): I am interested about Europa which orbits Jupiter. If life was found on Europa, what are the biological protocols to protect indigenous life and samples on or from other worlds?
14. Esme H. (Age 11): How long did it take to get used to life on the space station?
15. Matthew K. (Age 11): What is the daily day to day routine in regards to personal hygiene?
16. Megan M. (Age 12): This is your first visit to the to the International Space Station. What are your thoughts on another opportunity and perhaps take part in a spacewalk?
17. Nuala R. (Age 13): Does it feel like you’re moving when you’re on the ISS or do you just feel as though you are floating in the emptiness of space?
18. Lior I. (Age 14): What do you think will change in space stations in the future decade?
19. Melody H. (Age 11): What’s your favourite thing to do in space?
20. Flora V. (Age 11): When you come back to earth do you see the earth differently than you did before you left?
21. Tom E. (Age 11): What is the strangest thing you have seen in space?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAbout ARISS:

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA. The US Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) provide ARISS special support.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies, and amateur radio. For more information, see www.ariss.org, www.ariss-eu.org and https://www.amsat-on.be/hamtv-summary/ 

73, Gaston Bertels – ON4WF

How to hear the ISS, with an amateur radio transceiver, scanner or by listening online on your phone or tablet via a WebSDR https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

The event will be streamed live from 1200 GMT at https://live.ariss.org/

Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 Receive Anomaly

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

Following the launch of Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 AMSAT Engineering began the commissioning process, with the help of AMSAT Operations, on Tuesday, December 4.

Satellite telemetry indicates that the bird is healthy, and I thank all of the stations who have captured and relayed the telemetry that enabled us to monitor and determine the health of the various systems on board. Fox-1Cliff required an extended period monitoring battery and power levels due to the anomaly and fix that was applied back in February of 2016 during environmental testing, and the result of that is positive.

However, during the next steps of commissioning we discovered an anomaly with her receive capability. After a few days of tests, analysis, and discussion, it appears that Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 will not be commissioned as our fourth Fox-1 amateur radio satellite.

AMSAT Engineering will continue to evaluate and test Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 for solutions to the anomaly and your continued help in providing telemetry is appreciated so that we can have data throughout her daily orbits rather than limited data over our U.S. stations. The data, analysis, and testing could lead to a positive solution but at the very least will be important to AMSAT’s satellite programs in providing information that would help us and others, as we do freely share our successes and failures, to avoid similar situations with future missions.

I would like to thank all of the AMSAT Fox Engineering volunteers who made Fox-1Cliff possible and continue to build our new satellites, becoming even better as we move forward.

I will provide more information on the anomaly and any determination we make regarding the possible cause or causes as well as information on the possibility of recovery, over time. Please be patient regarding that. Many of you have probably built a project and had to troubleshoot it on your bench, we are in a troubleshooting situation here with the additional challenge of being 600 km away from our bench.

Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT Vice President of Engineering

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