Es’hail-2/P4A Designated Qatar-OSCAR 100 (QO-100)

Es'hail-2 Geostationary Satellite - credit Es'hailSat

Es’hail-2 Geostationary Satellite – credit Es’hailSat

On November 15, 2018, Es’hail-2/P4A was launched on a Falcon 9 launch vehicle from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 40 in Florida.

Es’hail-2/P4A was developed jointly by QARS (Qatar Amateur Radio Society) and Es’hailSat (the Qatar Satellite Company), with AMSAT-DL as the technical lead, and is the first geostationary amateur radio payload. The satellite has reached its final position at 25.9 °E, and the narrow and wideband transponders were successfully tested on December 23rd. The transponders are expected to be opened for general use in February 2019.

At the request of AMSAT Deutschland e.V., QARS, and Es’hailSat, AMSAT hereby designates Es’hail-2/P4A as Qatar-OSCAR 100 (QO-100). May the 100th OSCAR satellite be the guide star to future amateur radio satellites and payloads to geostationary orbit and beyond.

Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations / OSCAR Number Administrator

Es’hail-2 WebSDR enables you to receive both the Narrowband and Wideband transponders online
https://eshail.batc.org.uk/

Es’hail-2 amateur radio transponder information
https://amsat-dl.org/en/eshail-2-amsat-phase-4-a
https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geosynchronous/eshail-2/

Consultation on Amateur Satellite Service – Your input needed

EO-79 and EO-80 – Image Credit ISIS

Satellite / nanosatellite project managers often wish to use amateur radio frequencies for educational and outreach purposes. The amateur radio community thus offers them a tremendous potential for monitoring their fragile conception. They often ask what kind of amateur radio experience would be interesting onboard a CubeSat or what services they could provide with their communications systems. The answer can be simple: a transponder, but these designers would like to bring novelty and innovation.

In order to provide more factual input, AMSAT-F has decided to launch an English Language Online Survey to find out what you do and would like to do as a satellite activity, what you expect from satellite designers and what you can bring to them. *The synthesis of these results will be presented at the second* AMSAT-F meetings « Rencontre spatiale radioamateur » on March 9 and 10, 2019 in Nanterre (France).

Do not hesitate, give your opinion by completing the questionnaire via the link : https://framaforms.org/amsat-francophone-survey-1548716436

The survey is in English but hosted on French server. Few guideline could be in French.

73
Christophe Mercier
AMSAT-F President

AMSAT-F in Google English https://tinyurl.com/France-AMSAT-F

ARISS/NOTA ISS Slow Scan TV Event Feb 8-10

NOTA ISS SSTV image received by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL February 10, 2019

NOTA ISS SSTV image received by Peter Goodhall 2M0SQL in Elgin on February 10, 2019

ARISS is planning another of their popular Slow Scan Television (SSTV) experiment events. International Space Station (ISS) transmissions are scheduled to begin Friday, Feb. 8 at 14:00 UTC and run through Sunday, Feb. 10 at 18:30 UTC on 145.800 MHz FM with the SSTV mode likely to be PD120.

Update Feb. 9: SSTV transmissions on Friday were at very low power, however, full power was restored on Saturday afternoon.

Among the radio amateurs receiving the pictures was Laura M6LHT who with Jenny will be using them to show students as part of the Music Man Project – Twitter @MusicManProject

Laura M6LHT and Jenny receiving ISS SSTV pictures

Laura M6LHT and Jenny receiving ISS SSTV pictures

ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) operations is a process by which images are sent from the International Space Station (ISS) via ham radio and received by ham operators, shortwave listeners and other radio enthusiasts on Earth, similar to pictures shared on cell phones using twitter or instagram.

When this event becomes active, SSTV images will be transmitted from the ISS on the frequency of 145.800 MHz using the SSTV mode of PD120.

They can be received using ham radio equipment as simple as a 2 meter handheld radio or a common shortwave or scanner receiver the covers the 2 meter ham band.

After connecting the audio output of the radio receiver to the audio input of a computer running free software such as MMSSTV, the SSTV images can be displayed.

Music Man Project - Music is Magic in Spacet

Music Man Project – Music is Magic in Spacet

Transmissions will consist of eight NASA On The Air (NOTA) images (see https://nasaontheair.wordpress.com/). In additional, four ARISS commemorative images will also be included.

Once received, Images can be posted and viewed by the public at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php In addition, you can receive a special SSTV ARISS Award for posting your image. Once the event begins, see details at https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time. Please check for news and the most current information on the ARISS Twitter feed @ARISS_status or the AMSAT Bulletin Board

You can receive the pictures from the ISS by using the MMSSTV software and an Online Radio (WebSDR). Select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• Farnham WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

Check the N2YO site to see when the ISS is in range https://n2yo.com/?s=25544&df=1

ISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) hints and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Complete set of SSTV pictures received from the ISS by DK3WN Feb 8-10, 2019

Complete set of SSTV pictures received from the ISS by DK3WN Feb 8-10, 2019

NEXUS CubeSat designated as Fuji-OSCAR 99

NEXUS PosterOn January 18, 2019, NEXUS was launched on an Epsilon launch vehicle from the JAXA Uchinoura Space Center in Japan.

NEXUS (NExt generation X Unique Satellite) is a satellite developed jointly by Nihon University College of Science and Technology and the Japan Amateur Satellite Association (JAMSAT).

NEXUS demonstrates several new amateur satellite communication technologies, and includes a mode V/u linear transponder.

Telemetry has been received and decoded around the world since the launch, and the transponder was successfully tested on January 26th.

More information may be found at
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/nexus/E0_Top.html

At the request of the Nihon University College of Science and Technology and JAMSAT, AMSAT hereby designates NEXUS as Fuji-OSCAR 99 (FO-99). We congratulate the owners and operators of FO-99, thank them for their contribution to the amateur satellite community, and wish them continued success on this and future projects.

73, Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations / OSCAR Number Administrator

Frequencies:
• 437.075 MHz CW Telemetry
• 435.900 MHz FSK AX.25 / π/4 shift QPSK CCSDS
• SSB/CW transponder
– 145.900-145.930 MHz Uplink
– 435.880-435.910 MHz Downlink

NEXUS Blog http://tinyurl.com/NEXUS-Sat-Blog

JAMSAT in Google English http://tinyurl.com/JAMSAT

IARU Frequency Coordination http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=535

Ham radio SSTV from the Space Station

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

The Inter-MAI amateur radio Slow Scan Television experiment in the Russian Service Module of the International Space Station is scheduled to be activated Jan 30 – Feb 1 on 145.800 MHz FM using SSTV mode PD120.

Update January 29: MAI-75 SSTV setup and activation starts Wednesday, January 30 around 13:30 GMT and ends around 18:30 GMT. Similar activation periods for January 31 and February 1.

The ARISS-SSTV Blog says:

Received information that the Moscow Aviation Institute will be conducting their SSTV experiment from January 30 – February 1.

It appears from the scheduling that the experiment will only be active during a couple of orbits that overfly Moscow instead of a continuous operation. Rough time periods of activation appear to fall between the hours of 13:00 – 19:00 UTC. Activity should occur on the traditional 145.800 MHz downlink.

Source: ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

You can receive the pictures from the ISS by using the MMSSTV software and an Online Radio (WebSDR). Select a Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• Farnham WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

Check the N2YO site to see when the ISS is in range https://n2yo.com/?s=25544&df=1

ISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) hints and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

UWE-4 CubeSat frequency change request approved

After two weeks in orbit, UWE-4 is in very good shape. The batteries are fully charged, the temperatures of the batteries, the outside panels and the MCU are all lying in the expected range.

The temperatures of the outside Panels of UWE‑4 on the first day after launch

The temperatures of the outside Panels of UWE‑4 on the first day after launch

UWE-4 battery temperatures and State-of-charge on the first day after launch

UWE-4 battery temperatures and State-of-charge on the first day after launch

It can be seen, that the battery temperatures are slightly rising around 8:45 am, when the downlink of this measurement took place.

After the early orbit phase, we are looking forward to some interesting experiments with the attitude determination sensors and the propulsion system.

UWE-4 LogoUnfortunately, our uplink success rate is very poor, which currently prevents these experiments. In the precursor mission UWE-3, it was found that the reason for this is very likely a substantial noise floor at the used frequency range. For this reason, we filed a request for the change of our radio frequency to 435.600 MHz with IARU, which has already been approved.

Today, we will start the procedure to change the frequency of UWE‑4. So if you want to track UWE-4, please adjust your center frequency accordingly. We already started the procedure to change the frequency on UWE‑4, so during the next days it may happen that you can also still receive a signal on our old frequency. Additionally, we have been assigned NORAD ID 43880 in the meantime.

A tool in order to upload the received UWE-4 telemetry directly into our groundstation database is at the moment work in progress and will be shared with you as soon as we have tested it thoroughly. Until then, we would be very grateful, if you’d forward your UWE-4 telemetry files to uwe4@informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de.

Kind regards,

The UWE‑4 Team