WRC-23 Agenda Items may impact 144 MHz and 1240 MHz bands

IARU Region 1 notes that there are two proposals under discussion in Europe as possible future Agenda Items at WRC 2023, which potentially could impact important amateur radio frequencies.

IARU Region 1 has posted:

The following sets out the current IARU position on these proposals.

A proposal from France to consider the band 144-146 MHz as a primary allocation to the Aeronautical Mobile service, as part of a broader consideration of the spectrum allocated to that service.

The band 144-146 MHz is allocated globally to the amateur and amateur satellite services on a primary basis. This is one of the few primary allocations to the amateur service above 29.7 MHz and as such is an important and widely used part of the amateur spectrum with a vast installed base of users and operational satellite stations.

IARU views with grave concern any proposal to include this band in the proposed study. It will be representing this view energetically in Regional Telecommunications Organisations and in ITU to seek to obtain assurances that the spectrum will remain a primary allocation for the amateur services.

A proposal to study the amateur allocation in the 1240-1300 MHz (“23cm”) band following reported cases of interference to the Galileo navigation system.

IARU is aware of a handful of cases where interference to the Galileo E6 signal has been reported. In all cases these have been resolved by local action with the full cooperation of the amateur stations concerned.

IARU does not want the amateur service to affect the operation of the Galileo system in any way. Joint studies have been carried out to assess the true vulnerability of the system and, based on these, IARU regards the proposal to initiate an Agenda item for WRC-23 as premature.

The IARU position is that proper technical assessment of the issues involved should be made in the relevant CEPT study group. Proper account needs to be taken of the operational characteristics of the amateur service in order to develop sensible and proportionate measures that will facilitate the continued utility of the band for amateur experimentation whilst respecting the primary status of the GNSS service.

IARU is ready to cooperate fully in any studies and shares the objective of reaching a secure and permanent solution to the issues of sharing in this band.

IARU asks its Member Societies to draw this information to the attention of their members, and to refrain at this time from making speculative public comments about the situation until further progress has been made in regulatory discussions. IARU is also ready to discuss this issue with other societies not in IARU membership.

Source IARU Region 1
https://www.iaru-r1.org/index.php/88-news/1864-wrc-23-agenda-items

1240-1300 MHz band discussed by CEPT WGFM and CPG/PTA
https://amsat-uk.org/2019/05/31/1240-1300-mhz-band-discussed-by-cept-wgfm-and-cpg-pta/

AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2019 Second Call for Speakers

Kents Hill Park Conference Centre Milton Keynes MK7 6BZAMSAT-UK is very happy to announce the 2019 AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium will be held October 12-13 at the Kents Hill Park Conference Centre, Timbold Drive, Milton Keynes, MK7 6BZ.

We invite speakers, to cover topics about Amateur satellites, CubeSats, Nanosats, Space, High Altitude Balloons and associated activities, for this event. Those wishing to speak should contact Dave, G4DPZ, dave at g4dpz dot me dot uk

The weekend event attracts an international audience that ranges from those involved in building and operating amateur radio satellites to beginners who wish to find out more about this fascinating branch of the hobby.

We will be including a roundup of a number of new live and potential spacecraft projects that are under investigation and/or development.

Details of the event can be found at https://amsat-uk.org/colloquium/

73 Dave Johnson, G4DPZ
on behalf of the AMSAT-UK Committee

CubeSat Developers Workshop – talks now available

CalPoly CubeSat_LogoVideos of the talks given at the 2019 CubeSat Developers Workshop held at Cal Poly Performing Arts Center, San Luis Obispo, CA during April 23–25 are now on YouTube.

Schedule of presentations
http://mstl.atl.calpoly.edu/~workshop/archive/2019/Spring/2019-CDW-Schedule.pdf

Watch the videos at
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCENz0fNHsDR8Kz3jM6C_VWw/videos

PDF Slides are in the CubeSat Developers Workshop Archive
http://mstl.atl.calpoly.edu/~workshop/archive/

CalPoly CubeSat
https://twitter.com/CalPolyCubeSat
http://www.cubesat.org/mailinglist/

CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) amateur radio satellite now ready for launch

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing test

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing test

CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) satellite is an amateur radio satellite combined with educational. Chinese Amateur Satellite Group ( CAMSAT ) is working the project with Beijing Institute of Technology ( BIT ), one of the most famous aerospace universities in China. The university provides support in launch of the satellite, there are many teachers and students from this university are participating in the development and testing of the satellite. With the help of CAMSAT, the university has established an amateur radio club (call sign: BI1LG), many students are the members, they are learning amateur radio satellite communication and experience endless fun.

CAS-7B / BP-1B satellite schematic diagram

CAS-7B / BP-1B satellite schematic diagram

Because of the orbital apogee and the size and mass of the satellite, the orbital life of the satellite is expected to be only one week, up to a maximum of one month, which will also provide with an opportunity for hams to track and monitor satellite entering the atmosphere.

The CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) is scheduled to be launched at the end of June 2019. The launch will use a new launch vehicle from a small commercial rocket company. This is the first launch of this launch vehicle, and there is a large possibility of failure, if the launch fails, we will have another launch later this year.

Satellite Name: CAS-7B/BP-1B
• Architecture: 1.5U Cube-satellite with flexible film ball
• Dimensions: 263Lx140Wx105H mm with 500 mm diameter flexible film ball
• Mass: 3kg
• Stabilization: Pneumatic resistance sail passive control

Orbit:
• Orbit type : LEO
• Apogee : 300km Circular orbit
• Inclination : 42.7º
• Period : 90.6min

Payload:
• VHF Antenna: one 1/4λ monopole antenna with max.0dBi gain is located at +Y side
• UHF Antenna: two 1/4λ monopole antennas with max.0dBi gain are located at –Z and +Z side
• CW Telemetry Beacon: 435.715MHz 20dBm
• V/U FM Transponder Downlink: 435.690MHz 20dBm, 16kHz bandwidth
• V/U FM Transponder Uplink: 145.900MHz 16kHz bandwidth

CAMSAT CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) News Release PDF with Telemetry Format – CAMSAT CAS-7B News Release

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing thermal vacuum test

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing thermal vacuum test

1240-1300 MHz band discussed by CEPT WGFM and CPG/PTA

WRC-2000 saw the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) get an allocation at 1260-1300 MHz. This was the same ITU conference that saw 432-438 MHz being allocated for satellites that carry Synthetic-Aperture Radar (SAR) systems.

In January 2006 Peter Blair G3LTF published a paper Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations. This described the proposed Galileo system design and its applications with particular reference to the E6 (1260-1300 MHz) band. It described the operation of typical Galileo receivers and their ability to deal with interference and gave practical illustrations of these effects.

The 30-satellite Galileo system (24 operational and 6 active spares) is expected to be completed by 2020.

A paper at the CEPT WGFM meeting #93 held in Rome, February 4-8, 2019, titled Coexistence between AS [Amateur Services] and RNSS in the Frequency Range 1260-1300 MHz said:

At the most recent meeting of CPG/PTA #5 in September 2018 the European Commission provided a proposal for Agenda Item 10 of WRC-19 on the amateur service allocation in L band. The EC contribution (CPG/PTA(18)080) proposed to consider an extension of the spectrum allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis in the range 1300 – 1350 MHz. Germany announced at that meeting that a measurement campaign was already planned to investigate further the coexistence of applications in the amateur service and the radionavigation-satellite service [RNSS] particularly in the frequency range 1260 – 1300 MHz.

Since then these measurements were carried out at the premises of the “Universität der Bundeswehr München” (University of Federal Armed Forces Munich) mid December 2018 and a report on the issue is in preparation. At CPG/PTA #5 the meeting agreed to wait for the results of the measurement before taking any further action. Currently the measurement data is being processed and the results will be reported to CPG/PTA #6 in April 2019. Germany would offer to present this report also to WG FM.

Depending on the results the issue could become an enforcement issue for CEPT and, hence, may become a topic for further consideration in WG FM and WG SE.

WGFM Meeting #93 Paper: Coexistence between Amateur Services and RNSS (Galileo) in the Frequency Range 1260-1300 MHz
https://cept.org/Documents/wg-fm/49268/fm-19-069_information-on-measurement-campaign-on-as-gnss-in-1260-1300-mhz-germany

The CPG/PTA meeting #6 held in Bucharest April 1-5, 2019, saw this proposal:

PTA is asked to consider the results of these tests to determine if appropriate actions are required.

A possible action could be to propose a new Agenda Item for WRC-23 to address the issue. The subject could be: to consider the possible additional spectrum allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis above 1300 MHz (or in another frequency band to be determined), with a view to progressively migrate the radio amateurs services from the band 1240-1300 MHz to the new band. To study an ITU recommendation for the coexistence of services in the band 1240-1300 MHz in the short/medium term.

CPG/PTA meeting #6 paper: PTA(19)061 EC-JRC_Compatibility between amateur and Galileo
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/cpg-pt-a/client/meeting-documents/?flid=9504

WRC-19 Conference Preparatory Group meeting documents
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/client/meeting-documents/

2015 European Commission Joint Research Centre report Compatibility between Amateur Radio Services and Galileo in the 1260-1300 MHz Radio Frequency Band – download PDF here

January 2006 – Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

ISS Slow Scan TV June 5-6

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

A Russian MAI-SSTV event is planned from the International Space Station for Wednesday, June 5 from 12:00-16:00 GMT and June 6 from 11:30-15:30 GMT.

ARISS say they expect transmissions to be at 145.800 MHz FM in SSTV mode PD120. Based on the times received, they do not expect SSTV signals over North America.

Check here for updates https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.

Once the event begins the transmissions should be transmitted on 145.800 MHz FM using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Amateur radio operators and other radio enthusiasts are invited to post the images they receive at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and is subject to change at any time.

You can use online radios to receive signals from the International Space Station:
• SUWS WebSDR located Farnham near London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR located European Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

ISS SSTV information and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/