Spring 2022 OSCAR News now available to download

Spring 2022 OSCAR News Front CoverE-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the March 2022 edition of OSCAR News, issue 237, here.

The paper edition edition will be sent to postal members and should arrive in the next 2-3 weeks.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• AO-91 Distance Record
• 23cm Band and RNSS – Compromises need to be found
• JW0X – JW100QO by DX-Adventure
• How to add another satellite to the SatPC32 software
• Nayif-1 (EO-88) celebrates a 5th Birthday in orbit!
• AMSAT OSCAR 73 – The Beginning of the End?
• URESAT-1 – A chess playing ham radio satellite
• Two Minor Breakup Events in Fourth Quarter of 2021
• Some Initial Testing of Mobile Data Modes via QO-100
• Bob Bruninga, WB4APR (SK)
• Small Spacecraft Reliability Initiative Knowledge Base Tool v2.0 Released

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download the quarterly publication OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

ISS SSTV April 7-8 145.800 MHz FM

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Russian cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are planning to transmit Slow Scan TV (SSTV) images on 145.800 MHz FM probably using the SSTV mode PD-120.

The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be made from the amateur radio station RS0ISS in the Russian ISS Service module (Zvezda) using a Kenwood TM-D710E transceiver.

• April 7 start about 08:00 GMT, stop about 15:35 GMT*
• April 8 start about 08:40 GMT, stop about 16:10 GMT*

*Dates and times may be subject to change.

The signal should be receivable on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

CAS-10 CubeSat has an Amateur Radio Transponder

CAMSAT’s CAS-10 is an 8U CubeSat that will carry an Amateur Radio VHF to UHF linear transponder for SSB communications.

A follow on mission from CAS-9 and also known as Hope-4 (XW-4) CAS-10 is an 8U CubeSat, approx 228 x455x 100mm, with a mass of 12kg. The satellite will carry:

1. A VHF uplink and UHF downlink linear transponder with a bandwidth of 30kHz. This transponder will work all day during the life cycle of the satellite, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can use it for two-way radio relay communications.

2. A camera, and the pictures it takes are stored in the flash memory on the satellite, we have designed a simple remote control system based on DTMF, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can send DTMF commands to download the camera photos.

3. A CW beacon to send satellite telemetry data, which is also a feature that is widely welcomed by amateur radio enthusiasts.

4. A AX.25 4.8k/9.6kbps GMSK telemetry downlink

Planning a launch in November 2022 from Hainan Launch Center using a CZ-7 launch vehicle into a 400km circular 42.9 degree inclination orbit.

Source IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Status pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Amateur radio payload for the Tiangong space station

Artist's impression of the Tiangong Space Station in October 2021

Artist’s impression of the Tiangong Space Station in October 2021

The IARU satellite frequency coordination panel report an application has been submitted for an amateur radio payload to be hosted on the Tiangong space station.

The coordination request says:

CSSARC is the amateur radio payload for Chinese Space Station, proposed by Chinese Radio Amateurs Club (CRAC), Aerospace System Engineering Research Institute of Shanghai (ASES) and Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT).

The first phase of the payload is capable of providing the following functions utilizing the VHF/UHF amateur radio band:
1. V/V or U/U crew voice;
2. V/U or U/V FM repeater;
3. V/V or U/U 1k2 AFSK digipeater;
4. V/V or U/U SSTV or digital image.

The payload will provide resources for radio amateurs worldwide to make contacts with onboard astronauts, or communicate with each other. It will also play a rule to inspire students to pursue interests and careers in science, technology, engineering and math, and to encourage more people to get interested in amateur radio.

Planning a launch from Wenchang in Q3 2022 to the Chinese Space Station.

Source IARU satellite frequency coordination http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

WRC23: 23cm band work continues in CEPT

CEPT CPG WRC23 LogoThe Chair of IARU Region 1 Spectrum Affairs, Barry Lewis G4SJH, reports on the work being done in defending the interests of the Amateur Services in the 1240-1300 MHz band.

On the IARU Region 1 site he writes:

The 4th meeting of the CEPT project team (CPG PTC) tasked with developing the CEPT Brief for WRC23 agenda item 9.1b on 23cm band amateur service and RNSS coexistence took place during March 2022. The IARU R1 was present and provided a contribution to the working document. A summary report describing the contributions and the meeting activity can be found here:
https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/IARU-Report-from-CPG_PTC4r1.pdf

The meeting did not tackle any technical studies directly but the developing brief reports and summarises the activities taking place in other groups where they are being carried out. Updates were made to the background including a description of the work carried out by the amateur community in CEPT and ITU‑R with respect to resolves 1 of the WRC-19 Resolution 774. Further updates were introduced to describe the study work taking place in ITU‑R (WP’s 4C and 5A).

The draft CEPT Brief will undergo further development as technical studies evolve in the wider regulatory community including both CEPT and ITU‑R. The next activity concerning this topic will take place in the CEPT arena (SE40) to progress the technical studies and the draft ECC Report.

Source IARU Region 1 https://iaru-r1.org/

CEPT CPG https://www.cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/now4wrc23/client/meeting-documents/

Ofcom Consultation: Space Spectrum Strategy

Ofcom are holding a public consultation on their proposed strategy for managing radio spectrum used by the space sector.

Ofcom say:

Supporting the growing use of cutting-edge satellite technology to offer innovative services for people and businesses, is at the heart of Ofcom’s new proposed space spectrum strategy.

The space sector is expanding rapidly, with the number of space launches increasing by almost 60% between 2017 and 2021.

Companies such as OneWeb and SpaceX are deploying large numbers of new satellites – known as non-geostationary orbit (NGSO) satellite systems. Meanwhile, universities and start-ups are using smaller satellites to test and trial a range of exciting new projects.

Our proposed space spectrum strategy sets out our priorities for how we will help the sector deliver even more services in the coming years, while making sure it uses spectrum efficiently.

Supporting the growth of satellite broadband

Thousands of NGSO satellites orbit the Earth constantly, tracked by satellite dishes as they move across the sky, to provide broadband to homes and businesses in remote locations.

But these innovative news services need radio spectrum to work – and that’s where Ofcom comes in.

Our job is to make sure this spectrum is used efficiently and manage risks of interference between different spectrum users. So our space spectrum strategy sets out where we think we can make the biggest difference over the next two to four years, building on the licensing changes we introduced last year.

This includes considering options for future access to UK spectrum that could boost the capacity of satellite services, such as additional access to the 14.25 – 14.50 GHz band, as well as pursuing improvements to international NGSO rules.
Protecting vital Earth observation services

Earth observation satellites are playing an increasingly important role in collecting data on climate change. For example, they use radio waves to monitor changes in the natural world, such as the changing thickness of ice in polar regions. These systems also help other industries, such as agriculture, the emergency services and weather forecasting.

Part of our job is to help ensure Earth observation systems are protected from interference from other spectrum users.
Safe access to space

The rapidly rising numbers of space objects and proposals for mega-constellations has led to concerns across the space community about the potential for space debris.

Our role is to make sure there is appropriate spectrum available for systems that support the safe use of space, such as radar systems that track the many objects in space.

Helen Hearn, Ofcom Interim Spectrum Group Director, said: “While spectrum might be alien to some, we all rely on these invisible radio waves every day. And they’re vital to the rapidly growing space industry.

“So as the next generation of satellites beam down vital information to us, we’re playing our part to help the sector continue its journey and make sure these enterprising pioneers have the launchpad they need.”

The consultation closes on 24 May 2022 and we aim to publish our final strategy later this year.

Consultation document
https://ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0024/233853/consultation-space-spectrum-refresh.pdf

Further details anf response form at
https://www.ofcom.org.uk/consultations-and-statements/category-2/space-spectrum-strategy