CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) amateur radio satellite now ready for launch

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing test

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing test

CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) satellite is an amateur radio satellite combined with educational. Chinese Amateur Satellite Group ( CAMSAT ) is working the project with Beijing Institute of Technology ( BIT ), one of the most famous aerospace universities in China. The university provides support in launch of the satellite, there are many teachers and students from this university are participating in the development and testing of the satellite. With the help of CAMSAT, the university has established an amateur radio club (call sign: BI1LG), many students are the members, they are learning amateur radio satellite communication and experience endless fun.

CAS-7B / BP-1B satellite schematic diagram

CAS-7B / BP-1B satellite schematic diagram

Because of the orbital apogee and the size and mass of the satellite, the orbital life of the satellite is expected to be only one week, up to a maximum of one month, which will also provide with an opportunity for hams to track and monitor satellite entering the atmosphere.

The CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) is scheduled to be launched at the end of June 2019. The launch will use a new launch vehicle from a small commercial rocket company. This is the first launch of this launch vehicle, and there is a large possibility of failure, if the launch fails, we will have another launch later this year.

Satellite Name: CAS-7B/BP-1B
• Architecture: 1.5U Cube-satellite with flexible film ball
• Dimensions: 263Lx140Wx105H mm with 500 mm diameter flexible film ball
• Mass: 3kg
• Stabilization: Pneumatic resistance sail passive control

Orbit:
• Orbit type : LEO
• Apogee : 300km Circular orbit
• Inclination : 42.7º
• Period : 90.6min

Payload:
• VHF Antenna: one 1/4λ monopole antenna with max.0dBi gain is located at +Y side
• UHF Antenna: two 1/4λ monopole antennas with max.0dBi gain are located at –Z and +Z side
• CW Telemetry Beacon: 435.715MHz 20dBm
• V/U FM Transponder Downlink: 435.690MHz 20dBm, 16kHz bandwidth
• V/U FM Transponder Uplink: 145.900MHz 16kHz bandwidth

CAMSAT CAS-7B ( BP-1B ) News Release PDF with Telemetry Format – CAMSAT CAS-7B News Release

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing thermal vacuum test

CAS-7B / BP-1B undergoing thermal vacuum test

1240-1300 MHz band discussed by CEPT WGFM and CPG/PTA

WRC-2000 saw the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) get an allocation at 1260-1300 MHz. This was the same ITU conference that saw 432-438 MHz being allocated for satellites that carry Synthetic-Aperture Radar (SAR) systems.

In January 2006 Peter Blair G3LTF published a paper Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations. This described the proposed Galileo system design and its applications with particular reference to the E6 (1260-1300 MHz) band. It described the operation of typical Galileo receivers and their ability to deal with interference and gave practical illustrations of these effects.

The 30-satellite Galileo system (24 operational and 6 active spares) is expected to be completed by 2020.

A paper at the CEPT WGFM meeting #93 held in Rome, February 4-8, 2019, titled Coexistence between AS [Amateur Services] and RNSS in the Frequency Range 1260-1300 MHz said:

At the most recent meeting of CPG/PTA #5 in September 2018 the European Commission provided a proposal for Agenda Item 10 of WRC-19 on the amateur service allocation in L band. The EC contribution (CPG/PTA(18)080) proposed to consider an extension of the spectrum allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis in the range 1300 – 1350 MHz. Germany announced at that meeting that a measurement campaign was already planned to investigate further the coexistence of applications in the amateur service and the radionavigation-satellite service [RNSS] particularly in the frequency range 1260 – 1300 MHz.

Since then these measurements were carried out at the premises of the “Universität der Bundeswehr München” (University of Federal Armed Forces Munich) mid December 2018 and a report on the issue is in preparation. At CPG/PTA #5 the meeting agreed to wait for the results of the measurement before taking any further action. Currently the measurement data is being processed and the results will be reported to CPG/PTA #6 in April 2019. Germany would offer to present this report also to WG FM.

Depending on the results the issue could become an enforcement issue for CEPT and, hence, may become a topic for further consideration in WG FM and WG SE.

WGFM Meeting #93 Paper: Coexistence between Amateur Services and RNSS (Galileo) in the Frequency Range 1260-1300 MHz
https://cept.org/Documents/wg-fm/49268/fm-19-069_information-on-measurement-campaign-on-as-gnss-in-1260-1300-mhz-germany

The CPG/PTA meeting #6 held in Bucharest April 1-5, 2019, saw this proposal:

PTA is asked to consider the results of these tests to determine if appropriate actions are required.

A possible action could be to propose a new Agenda Item for WRC-23 to address the issue. The subject could be: to consider the possible additional spectrum allocation to the amateur service on a secondary basis above 1300 MHz (or in another frequency band to be determined), with a view to progressively migrate the radio amateurs services from the band 1240-1300 MHz to the new band. To study an ITU recommendation for the coexistence of services in the band 1240-1300 MHz in the short/medium term.

CPG/PTA meeting #6 paper: PTA(19)061 EC-JRC_Compatibility between amateur and Galileo
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/cpg-pt-a/client/meeting-documents/?flid=9504

WRC-19 Conference Preparatory Group meeting documents
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/client/meeting-documents/

2015 European Commission Joint Research Centre report Compatibility between Amateur Radio Services and Galileo in the 1260-1300 MHz Radio Frequency Band – download PDF here

January 2006 – Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

ISS Slow Scan TV June 5-6

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

A Russian MAI-SSTV event is planned from the International Space Station for Wednesday, June 5 from 12:00-16:00 GMT and June 6 from 11:30-15:30 GMT.

ARISS say they expect transmissions to be at 145.800 MHz FM in SSTV mode PD120. Based on the times received, they do not expect SSTV signals over North America.

Check here for updates https://twitter.com/ARISS_status

This event uses a computer in the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ARISS amateur radio station located in the Service Module which employs the Kenwood TM D710E transceiver.

Once the event begins the transmissions should be transmitted on 145.800 MHz FM using the PD-120 SSTV mode.

Amateur radio operators and other radio enthusiasts are invited to post the images they receive at http://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/index.php

Please note that the event is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and is subject to change at any time.

You can use online radios to receive signals from the International Space Station:
• SUWS WebSDR located Farnham near London http://farnham-sdr.com/
• R4UAB WebSDR located European Russia http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

ISS SSTV information and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

AMSAT-UK payload on ESEO has been activated

Frame received by PQ2HX in Brazil at around 14:17 UTC on April 12, 2019

Frame received by PQ2HX in Brazil at around 14:17 UTC on April 12, 2019

ESA have just released a new mission update for the ESEO Mission. It can be seen at https://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO/ESEO_mission_updates

We are delighted that on April 12, 2019, the BPSK telemetry transmitter, on our payload, was enabled for a period of just over 200 minutes in orbit!

ESEO AMSAT-UK Payload Telemetry Data

ESEO AMSAT-UK Payload Telemetry Data

Although we were not able to announce this activation in advance, more than ten stations around the world successfully received the telemetry on 145.895 MHz and submitted it to the FUNcube Data Warehouse. We are very grateful to them for their support.

Over 50 channels of Real Time and Whole Orbit Data were collected. For example, a number of on-board temperatures are shown in this graph which covers the period from 11:58 to 13:36 UTC

The very last frame received was captured by PQ2HX in Brazil at around 14:17 UTC.

We are keenly awaiting further possibilities to exercise more of the payload as soon as this becomes possible but, in the meantime, is good to know that all the telemetry channels reported nominal values.

FUNcube Patch on ESA PFC 71

 

Neil Melville-Kenney PA9N wearing FUNcube Patch on ESA PFC 71 - Credit Novespace and ESA

Neil Melville-Kenney PA9N wearing FUNcube Patch on ESA PFC 71 – Credit Novespace and ESA

Neil Melville-Kenney, PA9N, has been a long time supporter of amateur radio space since the days of the SSETI Express mission. He is presently the ESA Parabolic Flight Coordinator and today took the opportunity to fly a FUNcube patch during the ESA PFC 71 microgravity mission.
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_and_Robotic_Exploration/Research/Science_on_a_plane_ESA_s_next_parabolic_flight_campaign

FUNcube Mission Patch

Neil presented an account of his activities during the 2018 AMSAT-UK Colloquium and the three FUNcubes, AO73, EO88 and JO97 continue to provide a 24/7 service with their 2 metre downlinks.

You can follow Neil on Twitter at https://twitter.com/NMK_ZeroG

The FUNcube Mission Patch is available from the AMSAT-UK shop at
https://shop.amsat-uk.org/FUNCube_Mission_Patch/p3815740_15628523.aspx

RSGB AGM Es’hail-2 / QO-100 talk now available

Dave Crump G8GKQ, Phil Crump M0DNY and Noel Matthews G8GTZ receive award from RSGB President Dave Wilson M0OBW - image credit RSGB

Dave Crump G8GKQ, Phil Crump M0DNY and Noel Matthews G8GTZ receive award from RSGB President Dave Wilson M0OBW – image credit RSGB

The RSGB have made available a recording and slides of the presentation given at the AGM on April 27, 2019 about the Es’hail-2 / QO-100 amateur radio transponders.

After the formal AGM proceedings and the trophy presentations, attendees were treated to an introductory talk on Qatar-Oscar 100 geostationary satellite given by Noel Matthews, G8GTZ, Dave Crump, G8GKQ and Phil Crump, M0DNY.

Listen to the talk and download the slides at
https://rsgb.org/main/about-us/agm/agm-2019-proceedings/

Play the Listen to AGM 2019 afternoon recording and fast forward to 20 minutes and 41 seconds in. The slides are near the bottom of the page.

Qatar OSCAR-100 web receiver now live
https://amsat-uk.org/2019/02/10/qatar-oscar-100-web-receiver-now-live/