23cm band: Amateur radio coexistence with Sat-Nav

Galileo LogoThe Chair of IARU Region 1 Spectrum Affairs, Barry Lewis G4SJH, reports on the meeting of the ITU-R Working Party 4C (WP4C) July 5-13 which discussed the amateur radio 1240 MHz band.

On the IARU-R1 site he writes:

During the period 5 – 13 July 2021, the preparatory work for WRC-23 agenda item 9.1b continued in ITU‑R Working Party 4C (WP4C). (See Region 1 Feb 23rd news item for further background). The IARU member representatives from Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Japan, Norway, UK and USA, participated in the meeting and delivered additional information on amateur activities in this key microwave band

Preliminary studies came from France based on the ongoing CEPT work to provide initial estimates of separation distances required between RNSS GALILEO receivers and a sample of amateur emissions. The European Commission GALILEO team provided a set of observations pertaining to a RNSS interference event in northern Italy.

The work contributed by France, although needing refinement, is going in a good direction, using ITU‑R recommended propagation models and assumptions based on operating scenarios provided by the amateur community. Further work is needed to take account of the large disparity between the RNSS service receiver bandwidths and the frequency band offsets of the amateur applications based on the measurements carried out by Germany.

The RNSS community have updated their RNSS receiver protection criteria with an update to ITU‑R Recommendation M.1902 that now includes parameters relevant to the GALILEO E6 signal block. However these criteria only distinguish between a narrow band and wide band interferer level at the receiver and take no account of offset frequency in the receiver bandwidth or any time variance.

The IARU is working to ensure the amateur services are realistically represented in the studies as they move forward. It remains vital that national amateur communities present their views on the importance of this band to their national regulators in a consolidated and consistent manner. The work will continue throughout the year and beyond both in ITU‑R and in the regional telecommunications organisations and the IARU is committed to ensure every group hears the amateur position on this important microwave band.

Read Barry’s full post at
https://www.iaru-r1.org/2021/23cm-band-and-sat-nav-coexistence-preliminary-studies-considered-in-itu-r-wp4c/

Read the IARU Summary Meeting Report at
https://www.iaru-r1.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Report-from-WP4C_Jul-2021Rev1.pdf

Recent activity on the 23cm band RNSS Coexistence Studies

CEPT LogoThe Chair of IARU Region 1 Spectrum Affairs, Barry Lewis G4SJH, reports on the work being done in defending the interests of the Amateur Services in the 1240-1300 MHz band.

His IARU Region 1 post reads:

IARU is continuing to represent the amateur services interests in the 23cm band Galileo/GLONASS radio navigation satellite service coexistence discussions in the CEPT project teams.

The most recent CEPT SE40 project team meeting was held from 24th to 26th March 2021 and the IARU R1 was represented by Barry Lewis, G4SJH (Region 1 SRLC chair). At that meeting the first coexistence calculations were introduced by one CEPT administration, based on some initial assumptions about the amateur service operation. The IARU is continuing to work with the regulators to refine the details of these assumptions and make them and the calculations more representative of typical amateur station characteristics and band usage. These first calculations are considered only as a starting point and the meeting agreed that further work is needed to develop the calculations into a more comprehensive study.

Measurement campaigns have shown that the potential for coexistence depends very much on the frequency of the amateur service transmissions in the 23cm band with respect to the RNSS receiver bandwidth. This aspect needs to be considered more carefully once the initial scenarios and calculations are agreed.

In addition the IARU continues to have questions about the protection criteria required by the RNSS receivers and in particular how they relate to RNSS operational and service provision behaviour. IARU has ensured alignment of the amateur and amateur service information being used in CEPT with that being used in the parallel work in the ITU‑R relating to WRC-23 AI 9.1b.

Source IARU Region 1 https://iaru-r1.org/

The meeting Input paper “Amateur versus RNSS, interference areas” that was submitted by France as well as other meeting documents can be downloaded from
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/wg-se/se-40/client/meeting-documents/?flid=28532

1240-1300 MHz discussed at CEPT SE 40 meeting

CEPT LogoThe 69th meeting of CEPT ECC Working Group SE-40, held June 23-25, discussed the amateur radio 1240-1300 MHz band, the meeting documents are now available.

Several contributions were received for the ECC Report dealing with the coexistence between the radionavigation-satellite service and the amateur service in the frequency band 1240 – 1300 MHz. The contributions were incorporated in the draft ECC Report. The CPG arrangements for the preparation of WRC-23 for AI 9.1 topic b) was noted.

The Russian Federation noted:
1240-1260 MHz is by the GLONASS system
1260-1300 MHz are used by EU’s Galileo, Beijing’s Beidou, Japan’s QZSS and is planned to be used by Korea’s KPS.

Among the documents available in Input, Info and Minutes are:
• SE40(20)052 Amateur Repeaters – IARU-R1
• SE40(20)051 Section 2 update WI_39 – IARU-R1
• SE40(20)050 Annex Draft report RNSS Amateur – Russian Federation
• SE40(20)049 Suggestions for RNSS and Amateur Service Compatibility – Russian Federation
• Info 1 Amateur repeaters 23 cm – IARU-R1
• Info 3 Letter to SE40 chairman on updated of ITU-R M.1092 – European Commission
• Minutes
• SE40(20)56A3 (1) Draft Report Amateur vs RNSS

Download the meeting documents from
https://www.cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/wg-se/se-40/client/meeting-documents/?flid=27561

1240-1300 MHz ham radio band discussed by CEPT ECC SE40

CEPT LogoCEPT ECC has released its news summary for January 2020 that includes the SE40 Rome meeting on January 14-16 which discussed compatibility between RNSS and Amateur Services in 1240-1300 MHz.

The coexistence between the Radio Navigation Satellite Service (RNSS) and the Amateur Services in the frequency band 1240 – 1300 MHz was discussed by the CEPT ECC SE40 Working Group. The IARU presented possible scenarios to be taken into account in the sharing studies. The meeting agreed that further work on this WI will be developed in the SE40 Forum.

The papers, Amateur vs RNSS – Amateur scenarios – initial ideas, Draft Report RNSS vs Radioamateur, and Draft Minutes, along with other SE40 Rome meeting documents can be downloaded via
https://www.cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/wg-se/se-40/client/meeting-documents/?flid=27486

The CEPT ECC January news summary is at
https://cept.org/ecc/news/ecc-monthly-news-summary-for-january-2020/
https://twitter.com/CEPT_ECC

The Galileo GNSS constellation and 1296 EME operation
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2020/february/the-galileo-gnss-constellation-and-1296-eme-operation.htm

2006 article Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations by Peter Blair G3LTF
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

WRC-19 Update: Small Satellites, the 1240-1300 MHz band and Final Report

WRC19 - PB2T, VE3QN, EI3IO, DK4VW, K1ZZ, VK1DSH and RSGB Spectrum Forum Chair Murray G6JYB image credit DK4VW

WRC19 – PB2T, VE3QN, EI3IO, DK4VW, K1ZZ, VK1DSH and RSGB Spectrum Forum Chair Murray G6JYB image credit DK4VW

In the final week the meetings at WRC-19 have been running until 3am in the morning in an attempt to get the work completed.

The RSGB have released their WRC-19 report covering small satellites and also the Amateur 1240-1300 MHz band.

The report notes “A lesson from the process indicates how difficult it may be in future to achieve any upgrade to other amateur allocations.”

Read the RSGB Small Satellites and 23cm report at
https://rsgb.org/main/blog/news/gb2rs/2019/11/20/wrc-19-day-18-satellites-and-23cm/

Friday, November 22 saw WRC-19 conclude its month long biggest ever conference. Many of the 3,300 delegates had started to travel home even before the release of the ‘Provisional Final Acts’ and closing ceremony.

The ITU website has released the provisional acts as a huge 567-page PDF document—a tribute to the the hardworking editorial and translation teams at the conference. These provisional acts are due to come into force on January 1, 2021, so no early changes are currently expected in practice.

Read the RSGB WRC-19 Final report at
https://rsgb.org/main/blog/news/gb2rs/2019/11/22/wrc-19-day-20-and-finally/

WRC-19 Provisional Final Acts – 567 page document
https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-R/conferences/wrc/2019/Documents/PFA-WRC19-E.pdf

IARU update regarding Amateur Satellite allocations

IARU Team at WRC-19

IARU Team at WRC-19

The second week of the World Radiocommunication Conference reports on the status of two issues affecting the amateur satellite service.

In a report written by Dave Sumner, K1ZZ, first is an agenda item currently under review during this WRC-19 session; second is planning for future pressure on frequencies for the amateur satellite service.

Current WRC-19

While it does not directly affect us – work at WRC-15 saw to that – we are following an agenda item that seeks spectrum for telemetry, tracking and command in the space operation service for non-GSO satellites with short duration missions (CubeSats, among others).

We would like a solution to be found to cut down on the misuse of the very limited amateur-satellite spectrum for commercial applications. Discussions are focusing on spectrum near 137 MHz (down) / 149 MHz (up) but reaching agreement is proving to be very difficult.

Future – WRC-23

With the spectrum from 8.3 kHz to 275 GHz fully allocated and some bands above 275 GHz already identified for particular uses, any proposal for new allocations involves sharing with one or more incumbent services.
The pressures for spectrum access to accommodate new uses for commercial purposes are intense; for an established service such as ours, any WRC that does not reduce our own useful spectrum access is a success.

The idea of including the amateur two meter band in a study of non-safety aeronautical mobile service applications has not resurfaced. However, the IARU is concerned with a proposed item for WRC-23 entitled: “Review of the amateur service and the amateur-satellite service allocations to ensure the protection of the radionavigation-satellite service (space-to-Earth) in the frequency band 1240-1300 MHz.”

Our regulatory status is already clear. The amateur service is secondary in this band and the amateur-satellite service is permitted to operate in the Earth-to-space direction on a non-interference basis in the band 1260-1270 MHz. In the international Radio Regulations this is all the protection a primary service such as radionavigation-satellite requires; implementation is up to individual administrations.

The one well-documented case of interference to a Galileo receiver that prompted this proposed agenda item occurred more than five years ago and was quickly resolved by the administration concerned. There have been no known interference cases to user terminals.

An amateur service allocation of 1215-1300 MHz was made on a primary, exclusive basis in 1947, later downgraded to secondary to accommodate radiolocation (radar) and narrowed to 1240-1300 MHz. The radionavigation-satellite service was added in 2000. As a secondary service amateur radio has operated successfully in the band for many years.Given the relatively modest density and numbers of amateur transmissions in the band, we view the Galileo-oriented proposal for an agenda item as disproportionate.

The IARU recognizes the concern and does not want the amateur service to affect the operation of the Galileo system in any way. It has already updated its operational recommendations for amateur stations in Region 1. If necessary, further recommendations may be developed and rolled out globally.

In CEPT, two preliminary measurement studies of Galileo receiver performance/vulnerability (from 2015 and 2019) are currently being evaluated. Discussions can be more timely and focused within CEPT.

The IARU believes that this process already offers the potential for a satisfactory solution and thus the issue does not warrant WRC action and the commitment of ITU resources.

Source: http://www.iaru.org/news–events

Read the RSGB WRC-19 updates at https://rsgb.org/main/blog/category/news/special-focus/wrc-19/