Consultation on Amateur Satellite Service – Your input needed

EO-79 and EO-80 – Image Credit ISIS

Satellite / nanosatellite project managers often wish to use amateur radio frequencies for educational and outreach purposes. The amateur radio community thus offers them a tremendous potential for monitoring their fragile conception. They often ask what kind of amateur radio experience would be interesting onboard a CubeSat or what services they could provide with their communications systems. The answer can be simple: a transponder, but these designers would like to bring novelty and innovation.

In order to provide more factual input, AMSAT-F has decided to launch an English Language Online Survey to find out what you do and would like to do as a satellite activity, what you expect from satellite designers and what you can bring to them. *The synthesis of these results will be presented at the second* AMSAT-F meetings « Rencontre spatiale radioamateur » on March 9 and 10, 2019 in Nanterre (France).

Do not hesitate, give your opinion by completing the questionnaire via the link : https://framaforms.org/amsat-francophone-survey-1548716436

The survey is in English but hosted on French server. Few guideline could be in French.

73
Christophe Mercier
AMSAT-F President

AMSAT-F in Google English https://tinyurl.com/France-AMSAT-F

NEXUS CubeSat designated as Fuji-OSCAR 99

NEXUS PosterOn January 18, 2019, NEXUS was launched on an Epsilon launch vehicle from the JAXA Uchinoura Space Center in Japan.

NEXUS (NExt generation X Unique Satellite) is a satellite developed jointly by Nihon University College of Science and Technology and the Japan Amateur Satellite Association (JAMSAT).

NEXUS demonstrates several new amateur satellite communication technologies, and includes a mode V/u linear transponder.

Telemetry has been received and decoded around the world since the launch, and the transponder was successfully tested on January 26th.

More information may be found at
http://sat.aero.cst.nihon-u.ac.jp/nexus/E0_Top.html

At the request of the Nihon University College of Science and Technology and JAMSAT, AMSAT hereby designates NEXUS as Fuji-OSCAR 99 (FO-99). We congratulate the owners and operators of FO-99, thank them for their contribution to the amateur satellite community, and wish them continued success on this and future projects.

73, Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations / OSCAR Number Administrator

Frequencies:
• 437.075 MHz CW Telemetry
• 435.900 MHz FSK AX.25 / π/4 shift QPSK CCSDS
• SSB/CW transponder
– 145.900-145.930 MHz Uplink
– 435.880-435.910 MHz Downlink

NEXUS Blog http://tinyurl.com/NEXUS-Sat-Blog

JAMSAT in Google English http://tinyurl.com/JAMSAT

IARU Frequency Coordination http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=535

UWE-4 CubeSat frequency change request approved

After two weeks in orbit, UWE-4 is in very good shape. The batteries are fully charged, the temperatures of the batteries, the outside panels and the MCU are all lying in the expected range.

The temperatures of the outside Panels of UWE‑4 on the first day after launch

The temperatures of the outside Panels of UWE‑4 on the first day after launch

UWE-4 battery temperatures and State-of-charge on the first day after launch

UWE-4 battery temperatures and State-of-charge on the first day after launch

It can be seen, that the battery temperatures are slightly rising around 8:45 am, when the downlink of this measurement took place.

After the early orbit phase, we are looking forward to some interesting experiments with the attitude determination sensors and the propulsion system.

UWE-4 LogoUnfortunately, our uplink success rate is very poor, which currently prevents these experiments. In the precursor mission UWE-3, it was found that the reason for this is very likely a substantial noise floor at the used frequency range. For this reason, we filed a request for the change of our radio frequency to 435.600 MHz with IARU, which has already been approved.

Today, we will start the procedure to change the frequency of UWE‑4. So if you want to track UWE-4, please adjust your center frequency accordingly. We already started the procedure to change the frequency on UWE‑4, so during the next days it may happen that you can also still receive a signal on our old frequency. Additionally, we have been assigned NORAD ID 43880 in the meantime.

A tool in order to upload the received UWE-4 telemetry directly into our groundstation database is at the moment work in progress and will be shared with you as soon as we have tested it thoroughly. Until then, we would be very grateful, if you’d forward your UWE-4 telemetry files to uwe4@informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de.

Kind regards,

The UWE‑4 Team

UWE-4 satellite ready to launch

UWE-4 in the launch deployer

UWE-4 in the launch deployer

Last week our Team returned from the Vostochny Launch Site (Russia) where we performed the last check out tests of UWE-4 before launch on December 27, 2018.

The satellite will be launched through the German integrator ECM Space on a Soyuz-2 mission using a Fregat upper stage on December 27, 2018 at 02:07:18 UTC.

UWE-4 transportation to Far East of Russia was very smooth, so only a last software update and recharging of the batteries needed to be performed. By now, UWE-4 has been successfully integrated into the launch deployer followed by the integration with the upper stage, the fairing encapsulation will occur Thursday December 20.

UWE-4 LogoIn the meantime we updated our website to provide more detailed information about the orbit and the communication parameter including the beacon decoding information.

You can find all these and some more details here:
http://www7.informatik.uni-wuerzburg.de/forschung/space-exploration/projects/uwe-4/

As soon as we can provide the TLE, you will find them also on our website.

Kind regards,

The UWE‑4 Team

Post launch updates on the JY1SAT and ESEO missions

JY1SAT (JO-97) CubeSat

JY1SAT (JO-97) CubeSat

JY1SAT (JO-97) carrying the FUNcube-6 amateur radio transponder and ESEO with the FUNcube-4 transponder were launched on December 3, 2018.

JY1SAT – Although not finally confirmed, good tracking results are being obtained using the TLEs for object 2018-99AX / 43803, the 1200 bps BPSK telemetry beacon is on 145.840 MHz.

Commissioning of the spacecraft is continuing and there may be some changes to the operating modes over the next couple of weeks. Please continue to let the Data Warehouse have as much data as possible. In that regard, an updated version of the JY1SAT Dashboard (ver 1189) has just been released. This fixes a couple of buggettes relating to Doppler tracking over multiple orbits and the graph displays now no longer start at zero. This update v1189 JY1 Dashboard can be downloaded from https://download.funcube.org.uk/JY1Sat_Dashboard_v1189.msi

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO satellite in the anechoic chamber at the ESTEC test facilities, in the Netherlands

ESEO – In a similar manner to JY1SAT, the official confirmation has not been received, but the best TLEs are currently 2018-99AL / 43792. The 9600 bps downlink signal on 437.00 MHz is quite strong and reports and recordings are welcomed. Please continue to check the https://www.esa.int/Education/ESEO website for the latest updates from ESA.

We can confirm that the AMSAT payload with a downlink on 145.985 MHz has not yet been activated and that DK3WN and EA4GPZ, working with other collaborators, have developed a decoder for the 437.00 MHz downlink signals.

Decoding ESEO https://destevez.net/2018/12/decoding-eseo/

It is hoped that a UI, to show the actual telemetry values, will also be available soon.

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 Receive Anomaly

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

AO-95 (Fox-1Cliff) CubeSat

Following the launch of Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 AMSAT Engineering began the commissioning process, with the help of AMSAT Operations, on Tuesday, December 4.

Satellite telemetry indicates that the bird is healthy, and I thank all of the stations who have captured and relayed the telemetry that enabled us to monitor and determine the health of the various systems on board. Fox-1Cliff required an extended period monitoring battery and power levels due to the anomaly and fix that was applied back in February of 2016 during environmental testing, and the result of that is positive.

However, during the next steps of commissioning we discovered an anomaly with her receive capability. After a few days of tests, analysis, and discussion, it appears that Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 will not be commissioned as our fourth Fox-1 amateur radio satellite.

AMSAT Engineering will continue to evaluate and test Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 for solutions to the anomaly and your continued help in providing telemetry is appreciated so that we can have data throughout her daily orbits rather than limited data over our U.S. stations. The data, analysis, and testing could lead to a positive solution but at the very least will be important to AMSAT’s satellite programs in providing information that would help us and others, as we do freely share our successes and failures, to avoid similar situations with future missions.

I would like to thank all of the AMSAT Fox Engineering volunteers who made Fox-1Cliff possible and continue to build our new satellites, becoming even better as we move forward.

I will provide more information on the anomaly and any determination we make regarding the possible cause or causes as well as information on the possibility of recovery, over time. Please be patient regarding that. Many of you have probably built a project and had to troubleshoot it on your bench, we are in a troubleshooting situation here with the additional challenge of being 600 km away from our bench.

Jerry Buxton, N0JY, AMSAT Vice President of Engineering

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