AMSAT-UK Colloquium 2022 – Call For Speakers

Kents Hill Park Conference Centre Milton Keynes MK7 6BZ

Kents Hill Park Conference Centre Milton Keynes MK7 6BZ

This is the first call for speakers for the AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium 2022 to be held as part of the RSGB Convention on October 8-9 at the Kents Hill Park Conference Centre, Timbold Drive, Milton Keynes, MK7 6BZ.

https://amsat-uk.org/colloquium/

AMSAT-UK invite speakers, about amateur radio, space and associated activities, for this event.

Submissions should be sent via e-mail: to dave at g4dpz.me.uk

AMSAT-UK also invites anyone with requests for Program Topics to submit them as soon as possible.

Likewise if anyone knows of a good speaker on subjects of interest to the audience, please send us details.

AMSAT-UK Space Colloquium October 8-9

Kents Hill Park Conference Centre Milton Keynes MK7 6BZ

Kents Hill Park Conference Centre Milton Keynes MK7 6BZ

AMSAT-UK is very happy to announce the 2022 AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium will be held as part of the RSGB Convention on October 8-9 at the Kents Hill Park Conference Centre, Timbold Drive, Milton Keynes, MK7 6BZ.

The weekend event attracts an international audience that ranges from those involved in building and operating amateur radio satellites to beginners who wish to find out more about this fascinating branch of the hobby.

Booking for the RSGB Convention is at https://rsgb.org/main/about-us/rsgb-convention/

Booking for the AMSAT-UK dinner on the Saturday evening at the nearby Hilton Hotel is here

Details of the event can be found at https://amsat-uk.org/colloquium/

CAS-10 CubeSat has an Amateur Radio Transponder

CAMSAT’s CAS-10 is an 8U CubeSat that will carry an Amateur Radio VHF to UHF linear transponder for SSB communications.

A follow on mission from CAS-9 and also known as Hope-4 (XW-4) CAS-10 is an 8U CubeSat, approx 228 x455x 100mm, with a mass of 12kg. The satellite will carry:

1. A VHF uplink and UHF downlink linear transponder with a bandwidth of 30kHz. This transponder will work all day during the life cycle of the satellite, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can use it for two-way radio relay communications.

2. A camera, and the pictures it takes are stored in the flash memory on the satellite, we have designed a simple remote control system based on DTMF, and amateur radio enthusiasts around the globe can send DTMF commands to download the camera photos.

3. A CW beacon to send satellite telemetry data, which is also a feature that is widely welcomed by amateur radio enthusiasts.

4. A AX.25 4.8k/9.6kbps GMSK telemetry downlink

Planning a launch in November 2022 from Hainan Launch Center using a CZ-7 launch vehicle into a 400km circular 42.9 degree inclination orbit.

Source IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Status pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Ofcom Consultation: Space Spectrum Strategy

Ofcom are holding a public consultation on their proposed strategy for managing radio spectrum used by the space sector.

Ofcom say:

Supporting the growing use of cutting-edge satellite technology to offer innovative services for people and businesses, is at the heart of Ofcom’s new proposed space spectrum strategy.

The space sector is expanding rapidly, with the number of space launches increasing by almost 60% between 2017 and 2021.

Companies such as OneWeb and SpaceX are deploying large numbers of new satellites – known as non-geostationary orbit (NGSO) satellite systems. Meanwhile, universities and start-ups are using smaller satellites to test and trial a range of exciting new projects.

Our proposed space spectrum strategy sets out our priorities for how we will help the sector deliver even more services in the coming years, while making sure it uses spectrum efficiently.

Supporting the growth of satellite broadband

Thousands of NGSO satellites orbit the Earth constantly, tracked by satellite dishes as they move across the sky, to provide broadband to homes and businesses in remote locations.

But these innovative news services need radio spectrum to work – and that’s where Ofcom comes in.

Our job is to make sure this spectrum is used efficiently and manage risks of interference between different spectrum users. So our space spectrum strategy sets out where we think we can make the biggest difference over the next two to four years, building on the licensing changes we introduced last year.

This includes considering options for future access to UK spectrum that could boost the capacity of satellite services, such as additional access to the 14.25 – 14.50 GHz band, as well as pursuing improvements to international NGSO rules.
Protecting vital Earth observation services

Earth observation satellites are playing an increasingly important role in collecting data on climate change. For example, they use radio waves to monitor changes in the natural world, such as the changing thickness of ice in polar regions. These systems also help other industries, such as agriculture, the emergency services and weather forecasting.

Part of our job is to help ensure Earth observation systems are protected from interference from other spectrum users.
Safe access to space

The rapidly rising numbers of space objects and proposals for mega-constellations has led to concerns across the space community about the potential for space debris.

Our role is to make sure there is appropriate spectrum available for systems that support the safe use of space, such as radar systems that track the many objects in space.

Helen Hearn, Ofcom Interim Spectrum Group Director, said: “While spectrum might be alien to some, we all rely on these invisible radio waves every day. And they’re vital to the rapidly growing space industry.

“So as the next generation of satellites beam down vital information to us, we’re playing our part to help the sector continue its journey and make sure these enterprising pioneers have the launchpad they need.”

The consultation closes on 24 May 2022 and we aim to publish our final strategy later this year.

Consultation document
https://ofcom.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0024/233853/consultation-space-spectrum-refresh.pdf

Further details anf response form at
https://www.ofcom.org.uk/consultations-and-statements/category-2/space-spectrum-strategy

URESAT-1 – A chess playing ham radio satellite

URESAT-1 engineering prototype with another GENESIS prototype behind it

URESAT-1 engineering prototype with another GENESIS prototype behind it

URE report Intensive work is underway to make URESAT-1 available before the end of the year. If all goes according to plan, URESAT-1 will launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon-9 rocket from Cape Canaveral in October.

A translation of the post by Spain’s national amateur radio society URE says:

URESAT-1 is based on the architecture used in the GENESIS, EASAT-2 and HADES missions but will include significant improvements, such as a 32-bit computer compared to the 8-bit computers of the previous satellites and improvements in the mechanisms of deployment of antennas and batteries.

As for its functionalities, it will have a VHF / UHF FM repeater and FSK frames, like its predecessors. This will allow voice QSOs and digipeating of AX.25 and APRS frames.

The payload is not yet defined, but it could be the same SSTV camera that flies in HADES, a thruster or some kind of experiment. Talks with universities and companies and is expected to be closed in the coming weeks.

One of the projects that is confirmed is a chess game that will allow radio amateurs to play having as an opponent the on-board computer sending FSK frames with the movements, to which the on-board computer will answer in its telemetry. Several radio amateurs are working on the project and if it is completed by the time the satellite is due to be delivered, it will be included.

The expected orbital altitude is around 525 km and the inclination will be polar, probably around 97 degrees, which would place it in the same orbital plane as its companions EASAT-2 and Hades.

URE has created a blog in WordPress where the status of the project will be reported, including details of the functionalities and technicians.

The blog can be found here https://uresat.ure.es/

Source URE https://tinyurl.com/IARU-Spain

Nayif-1 (EO-88) Celebrates a 5th Birthday in orbit!

Wouter PA3WEG at the groundstation waiting for the first NAYIF-1 signals

Wouter PA3WEG at the groundstation waiting for the first NAYIF-1 signals

Nayif-1 (EO-88) was launched at 03:58 UTC on February 15, 2017, on a PSLV launcher from India. It was part of a world record launch as the C37 flight carried 104 spacecraft into orbit.

Nayif-1 team members after completion of the assembly and integration of the CubeSat

Nayif-1 team members after completion of the assembly and integration of the CubeSat

The transmitter was autonomously activated around 04:47 UTC and the first signals were received and decoded a few minutes later by KB6LTY and within a few hours more than 250 stations around the world had submitted telemetry reports to the Data Warehouse.

After more than 27500 orbits of the earth, the spacecraft continues to function nominally. It switches between high power telemetry when in daylight to low power telemetry and transponder when in eclipse.

The mission was developed by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC) and American University of Sharjah (AUS). The UAE’s first Nanosatellite was developed by Emirati engineering students from AUS under the supervision of a team of engineers and specialists from MBRSC within the framework of a partnership between the two entities, aiming to provide hands-on experience to engineering students on satellite manufacturing.