Huskysat-1 Transponder is Open

Artist's impression of HuskySat-1 flying free in space but it's still attached to Breeze K/M rocket body

Artist’s impression of HuskySat-1 flying free in space but it’s still attached to Breeze K/M rocket body

After a week of testing, the transponder on HuskySat-1 is enabled and open for use and testing. It’s fairly sensitive, and 5-10 watts is plenty most of the time. There are some fades due to satellite orientation, and some passes are definitely better than others. The operations and engineering teams are also watching a few anomalies. Please keep an eye on the beacon during transponder ops, for those with spectrum scopes. Strong signals may impact the beacon strength.

HuskySat-1 CubeSat

HuskySat-1 CubeSat

HuskySat-1 is the Husky Satellite Lab at University of Washington’s first cubesat, and the first mission with AMSAT’s linear transponder module (LTM-1), a V/u transponder and integrated telemetry beacon and command receiver. UW recently completed their Part 5 operations and have graciously let AMSAT’s Part 97 transponder operations commence. This transponder module is available for use in educational cubesat missions willing to enable the transponder for worldwide use. Contact Drew KO4MA or VP Engineering Jerry Buxton N0JY for additional details.

Reports and observations are welcome to the Amsat-BB mailing list.

Congratulations to Husky Satellite Lab, and to the entire AMSAT Engineering team for keeping amateur radio in space. Thanks to Dr. Mark Hammond, N8MH for commissioning and operations support.

73, Drew KO4MA
AMSAT VP Operations

HuskySat-1 V/u inverting transponder, 145.910 to 145.940 uplink, 435.810 to 435.840 downlink, telemetry beacon 1200 baud BPSK at 435.800

HuskySat-1 Boards

HuskySat-1 Boards

Online Amateur Radio Satellite talk on Zoom

International Space Station - Image Credit NASA

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

On Wednesday, May 13, at 1830 GMT (7:30pm BST) Robin Moseley G1MHU will give a talk on Zoom titled “Introduction to amateur satellites, meteor scatter, EME and ISS”.

The presentation is being organised by the Denby Dales Amateur Radio Society and being on Zoom it’ll be viewable on any Tablet or Smartphone with the Zoom App or from a Windows PC or Laptop.

The Zoom meeting ID is 278 609 9353 https://zoom.us/j/2786099353

A range of other talks are planned to be available on Zoom, they include:

Tuesday 5th May 7.30pm BST Martin Butler M1MRB of ICQ Podcast – Talk on the Future of radio clubs – which way forward ?

Wednesday 6th May 7.30pm BST Open club discussion on using a VNA

Wednesday 13th May 7.30pm BST Introduction to amateur satellites, meteor scatter, EME and ISS Robin Moseley G1MHU

Wednesday 20th May Don Field G3XTT Editor of Practical Wireless magazine

Denby Dales Amateur Radio Society http://www.DDARS.net/

Spring Issue of OSCAR News Available

Oscar News issue 229 March 2020 Front CoverE-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the March 2020 edition of OSCAR News, issue 229, here.

The paper edition edition is being sent to postal members and should arrive in the coming week.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• QO-100 Wideband Transponder – 2020 Operating Guidelines and Bandplan
• AMSAT QO-100 NB Transponder Bandplan Update
• 5-watt 2.4 GHz amplifier kit for QO-100
• My experience with the AMSAT-UK 5W QO-100 Amplifier
• Review of the DJ0ABR 5W 2.4GHz Amplifier
• Under Development!
• AMSAT Files Comments Opposing Deletion of 3.4 GHz Band
• The eSatellite Award by eQSL
• Ad Astra!
• One Year of Operation for the Goonhilly WebSDRs for QO-100
• HuskySat-1
• How Phoenix went from a Paper Proposal to ASU’s First Student-Led CubeSat in Space
• The Qarman Cubesat
• The latest FUNcube Groundstation – in Antarctica
• From the Archives – An AMSAT-NA Symposium early this century

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download the quarterly publication OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

Online Space Workshop May 2-3

Online Space Workshop 2020

Online Space Workshop 2020 #OSW2020

The Online Space Workshop #OSW2020 takes place this weekend May 2-3.

You can watch live on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4SHJxCLutZRWK9uQXFVXxQ

The full schedule of presentations is on the AMSAT Nepal site. Note the times are given in Nepali Time which is 5:45 hours ahead of GMT and 4:45 ahead of BST, see
http://amsat-np.org/osw2020/

Among the speakers are:

Tom Walkinshaw, founder and CEO of UK-based Alba Orbital, on Getting PocketQubes on Orbit, cheaply, regularly and reliably

Félix Páez EA4GQS, President of AMSAT Spain (AMSAT EA), on AMSAT EA PocketQube Missions and Designs

Julián Fernández EA4HCD, Co-Founder and CEO of Fossa Systems, on FOSSASAT-1, Data from the first IOT Picosatellites in Space

Follow AMSAT Nepal on Twitter at https://twitter.com/AmsatNepal

First Guatemalan satellite deployed from the ISS

Quetzal-1 CubeSat - Credit Universidad del Valle de Guatemala

Quetzal-1 CubeSat – Credit Universidad del Valle de Guatemala

Guatemala’s first satellite, a small CubeSat called QUETZAL-1, was deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) on Tuesday, April 28, 2020.

Its primary mission is to test a sensor for remote data acquisition for natural resource management, which could be used to monitor water quality in inland water bodies.

QUETZAL-1 LogoThe satellite is part of the Japanese Kibo cubesat program, a product of the cooperation between, among others, the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA), Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (UVG), and more institutions. The operational frequencies were chosen through cooperation from Guatemalan radio amateurs and the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU).

Downlink 4800 bps GMSK on 437.200 MHz.

The Quetzal-1 project team director is Guatemalan engineer José Bagur, TG8JAV, a graduate from mechatronics engineering at Universidad Del Valle.

Source IARU Region 2 https://iaru-r2.org/

IARU Quetzal-1 http://amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=653

Quetzal-1 Telemetry info https://uvg.edu.gt/cubesat-en/

Quetzal-1 Telemetry decoder http://www.dk3wn.info/p/?page_id=75524

Follow Quetzal-1 on Twitter https://twitter.com/quetzal1_uvg

ARRL, AMSAT Seek Changes in FCC Orbital Debris Mitigation Proposals

FCC SealARRL Washington Counsel Dave Siddall, K3ZJ, and AMSAT Executive Vice President Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, on April 8, discussed with senior FCC International Bureau staff by telephone the FCC’s draft Report & Order (R&O) on mitigation of orbital debris (IB Docket No. 18-313). The amateur representatives told the FCC staff that “two aspects of the draft regulations are of particular concern…. and would seriously hinder amateur radio’s future operations in space, if adopted as proposed without the relatively minor changes that we propose.”

First, ARRL and AMSAT requested a revision to proposed language that otherwise would allow only private individual licensees to indemnify the U.S. for the operations of an amateur space satellite. ARRL and AMSAT requested that satellite owners be added to that provision. The amateur representatives, noting that amateur radio licensees may only be individuals under the amateur rules, stated that “[i]n no other service would an individual be required to personally make a similar indemnification” and that “it would be difficult to impossible to find an individual Amateur Radio licensee willing to bear that risk.”

Second, ARRL and AMSAT asked the FCC to delay by 3 years the proposed effective date of April 23, 2022, for a rule that would require satellite operators to certify that space stations “be designed with the maneuvering capabilities sufficient to perform collision avoidance” for spacecraft designed to operate above 400 kilometers in altitude. Citing the long lead times to design and construct Amateur satellites, ARRL and AMSAT suggested that a more reasonable date would be April 23, 2025 and noted that, based on recent past years, only an estimated 3-5 amateur satellites likely would be launched during the extra period.

“We do not disagree with the purpose of this requirement,” they told the FCC staff, but “the proposed effective date is unreasonable in the case of amateur radio satellites.” The new effective date “would allow time for amateur spacecraft designers to adapt to this new requirement,” they said.

Citing the value of amateur satellites to the development of the commercial small satellite industry, and student participation in such projects, ARRL and AMSAT said a strong and robust Amateur Satellite Service will help inspire future developments in satellite technology. The requested changes to the draft R&O would help ensure that amateur radio continues to have a future in space and contribute to the public interest on an educational, non-pecuniary basis.

The FCC is expected to consider the R&O at its April 23 open meeting.
The AMSAT/ARRL document may be read in full at
https://ecfsapi.fcc.gov/file/10409353709408/AMSAT%20ARRL%2018-313%20Ex%20Parte%2004_08_2020.pdf

Source AMSAT News Service and ARRL https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans