Oscar News – Your input will be very welcome

OSCAR News 221 Spring 2018 Front CoverThe editors of the quarterly OSCAR NEWS magazine are now starting their hard work to put together the next edition. This will be published around the end of June.

Your news, views and articles for Oscar News are always very welcome. These really are the most exciting times to be involved win the amateur satellite world with so many unique new projects underway. The magazine continues to provide interesting details about these various space missions and the groundstations needed to communicate with them.

We are able to accept your input in almost any of the usual formats but please keep the images separate or put them at the end of the document.

Please contact us at ON-editor@amsat.org with your information or if you have any questions.

Thanks and 73 Graham – G3VZV

Russian SiriusSat CubeSats to be deployed during spacewalk

SiriusSat-1 RS13S and SiriusSat-2 RS14S CubeSats

SiriusSat-1 (RS13S) and SiriusSat-2 (RS14S) CubeSats

Two Russian CubeSats are expected be deployed from the International Space Station on Wednesday, August 15 during a spacewalk (EVA).

SiriusSat-1 (SXC1-181) call sign RS13S beacon 435.570 MHz
SiriusSat-2 (SXC1-182) call sign RS14S beacon 435.670 MHz

The satellites are at RSC Energia, where they are undergoing additional checks before being sent to the International Space Station. A launch is planned for July 10 on a Progress cargo vehicle to the ISS with deployment in August during a spacewalk.

Sputnix Facebook post https://www.facebook.com/Sputnixru/posts/1589717307807600

Bulgarian CubeSat EnduroSat on ISS awaiting deployment

EnduroSat One

EnduroSat One

Bulgaria’s first CubeSat, EnduroSat One, was launched to the International Space Station on the cargo resupply OA-9 mission on May 21, 2018 from the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport in Virginia, USA. On May 24 the Cygnus capsule docked to the Station and the satellite was taken onboard the ISS.

The satellite will be deployed from the ISS in the coming weeks.

The mission aims to popularize the Radio Amateur activities in Bulgaria and it will include cooperation with Bulgarian Federation of Radio Amateurs (BFRA), including workshops and additional educational activities.

The spacecraft has been completely built in Bulgaria. This first educational mission aims to inspire young Bulgarians and give them the chance to participate in a real space program!

The Space Challenges and EnduroSat teams have invested considerable resources, time and effort in preparing the Bulgarian CubeSat. In order to support the Radio Amateur community, the satellite emits in frequencies which are readily available for receiving by anyone with basic communication skills and radio equipment.

It is hoped the mission will help more young Bulgarians learn the basics of satellite communications through practical exercises empowered by the orbiting satellite.

Radio amateurs from around the Globe will be able to listen to the satellite beacon and to receive telemetry data from the satellite on a regular basis. They will be able to connect to the satellite, receive detailed telemetry information and receive a confirmation from the satellite for every established connection which will serve as QSL card.

Beacon: 437.050 MHz CW and 9600 bps GMSK AX.25

See the EnduroSat site for further information http://one.endurosat.com/

Bulgarian Federation of Radio Amateurs (BFRA) http://bfra.bg/
Google English site translation http://tinyurl.com/BulgariaBFRA

Linear transponder CubeSat to deploy from ISS

Masa JN1GKZ reports JAXA has announced three CubeSats, Irazu (Costa Rica), 1KUNS-PF (Kenya) and UBAKUSAT (Turkey)  will deploy from the International Space Station on Friday, May 11 between 1030-1040 GMT.

All the CubeSats carry amateur radio payloads, Irazu and 1KUNS-PF have telemetry beacons while UBAKUSAT carries a linear transponder for amateur radio SSB and CW communications in additional to CW and telemetry beacons.

Update May 12, 2018: Signals from all three satellites were successfully received during May 11.

The deployment will be broadcast live on YouTube, watch from 1000 GMT Friday, May 11.

Irazu is a 1U CubeSat developed by students at the Costa Rica Institute of Technology
Telemetry Beacon 9600 bps 436.500 MHz

1KUNS-PF is a 3U CubeSat developed by students at the University of Nairobi
Telemetry Beacon 1200 bps or 9600 bps 437.300 MHz
http://engineering.uonbi.ac.ke/sites/default/files/cae/engineering/engineering/1KUNS-PF_Cubesat_1.0_rev3.pdf

UBAKUSAT is a 3U CubeSat developed by students at the Istanbul Technical University
CW Beacon 437.225 MHz
Telemetry Beacon 437.325 MHz
Linear Transponder
• 435.200-435.250 MHz downlink
• 145.940-145.990 MHz uplink

Source Masa JN1GKZ Tokyo Japan

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Status http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru/

End of mission for PicSat

Artist's impression of PicSat in space

Artist’s impression of PicSat in space

PicSat, launched January 12, carried an amateur radio FM transponder. Unfortunately following a loss of communications in March the team has had to announce the end of the mission.

On the afternoon of Tuesday, March 20, 2018 PicSat suddenly fell silent, after two successful morning passes over Europe. Attempts to re-establish contact have failed, nothing has been heard from the satellite, no sign of life.

There was a short-lived hope that PicSat was heard on Friday, March 30 by radio amateurs at the Morehead State University, but the faint signal heard turned out to be another satellite TIGRISAT.

On Thursday, April 5, 2018, the team decided to call mission-closed. A “pot” (French for party / drink) was organised at noon at the Paris Observatory in Meudon. Sylvestre Lacour gave a short speech. Four radio amateurs who have been PicSat fans and great supporters joined in via a dedicated Google Hangout.

The team will continue to try to understand what went awry, while plans for new projects are being made. PicSat was operational for over 10 weeks. From a technological point of view it has been a success for the LESIA laboratory of the Paris Observatory – PSL, for whom PicSat has been the very first nano-satellite complete built and operated in-house. This experience will open doors for new nano-satellite projects in the (near) future.

Watch Bye Bye PicSat (for now)

PicSat https://picsat.obspm.fr/
https://twitter.com/IamPicSat

Athenoxat-1 QSL Card Challenge

Athenoxat-1 CubeSat 2015

Athenoxat-1

The Athenoxat-1 project team has implemented an interesting experiment (puzzle) where frames containing fragments of images of QSL cards are periodically transmitted by the satellite. Amateurs can participate in the experiment by receiving the fragments and sending KISS files via email to the Athenoxsat-1 project team. The frames will then be processed and the results will posted in their web site with acknowledgements to the participating stations.

AMSAT-BR would like to encourage amateurs to participate. Due to the satellite orbit inclination (15 degrees), only locations with latitudes below the tropics will be able to receive signals from the satellite. Signals can be demodulated using UZ7HO’s high speed soundmodem software (using the GOMX-1 4800 bps demodulator).

Original message from Yesie 9V1SQ describing the experiment follows:

Dear everyone,

Finally we’ve done with the preparation and in-orbit test of beacon puzzle round 2 (data type 3).
We can now inform you that Athenoxat-1 is beaconing data type 3 with 10 frames per burst every minute (30sec interval alternating with Morse CW).

For the stations around our control station (in Singapore), please keep tuning in as the satellite is still beaconing the data type 3 although it may seem appear busy in comm.operation.
The only apparent change is that you may not hear the Morse CW once our comm.operation starts.

We’ve updated our website here: http://www.micro-space.org/ham.html

We actually have started enabling this round 2 yesterday as part of in-orbit test to ensure the system is stable, before we can announce this officially.
At the same time, there are already kss files submissions, we’ll take them into account later.

Please let us know if you need any clarifications.
The kss files can be submitted through the usual address athenoxat@micro-space.org
Please feel free to inform others who may be interested and able to listen to Athenoxat-1.

Thank you in advance for listening.
73 de Athenoxat-1 team
Yesie 9V1SQ