Space Station contact planned for YOTA 2017

Carlos Eavis G3VHF operating the ARISS station GB4YOTA at Gilwell Park, UK

Carlos Eavis G3VHF operating the ARISS station GB4YOTA at Gilwell Park, UK

An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) contact is planned between astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, using the call sign NA1SS and the Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event, call sign GB4YOTA, taking place in Gilwell Park, UK.

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

The ARISS contact is scheduled Tuesday, August 8, 2017 at approximately 18:37 GMT (7:37 pm BST). This will be a direct radio contact, operated by GB4YOTA.

Downlink signals will be audible in the British Isles and parts of Europe on 145.800 MHz FM. The signal should be receivable on a handheld radio with 1/4 wave whip antenna, see
https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-hear-the-iss/

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA will also be operating the HamVideo Digital Television transmitter on 2395 MHz.

The Goonhilly receiver will be activated sometime Friday, August 4, and will remain active over the weekend and continue to track the ISS until Wednesday morning, August 9. Goonhilly, will be one of several European HamTV reception ground stations contributing to the reception of the HamTV signal for the contact itself.

Two web streams will be available:

1. The normal ARISS/BATC website will be available at https://ariss.batc.tv/hamtv This shows only the HamTV video downlink as an output from the merger facility, with an indication of which registered HamTV stations are providing signal input to the merger.

2. The ARISS Operations UK Team will be web streaming from the YOTA event itself at https://ariss.batc.tv/ This web stream includes introductions and presentations from the RSGB and the YOTA participants before the actual contact itself according to the timetable of the event below.

The timetable of the event is as follows. ALL times are GMT times:

17:30 – All participants and guests to be present at the location. The event web stream (https://ariss.batc.tv/) will start at approximately this time to capture some of the build-up.

17:40 – Formal start of the RSGB/YOTA introductions and presentations.

18:20 – ARISS Operations in the UK take over the event, give the background to what is happening, how it is organised and how all the different elements of the contact are managed.

18:38 – Scheduled time for start of contact with Nespoli operating as NA1SS. The YOTA participants will be using the GB4YOTA callsign.

18:50 – Approximate end of contact with Nespoli. After closing the contact, the operator will invite RSGB/YOTA to formally close down the ARISS event.

YOTA_UK_2017YOTA Information:

The Youngsters on the Air (YOTA) event happens every summer and offers a week-long range of wireless technology activities to 80 young people under the age of 26. The youngsters are all representing their national amateur radio societies and come from 28 countries located in IARU Region 1 (Europe, northern Asia, Africa and the Middle East). This year there will also be a visiting team from Japan.

The 2017 event takes place in the UK at Gilwell Park, the home of the Scouting movement, and includes a special event station GB17YOTA, a transceiver kit building workshop, some antenna building, an Amateur Radio Direction Finding (ARDF) contest and a Summits on the Air (SOTA) activation. The youngsters will be visiting Bletchley Park, the home of the Enigma code breakers, the National Radio Centre, and the Science Museum in London.

Because the event is taking place at the home of Scouting, there will be around 1000 Scouts on site and we hope to have some of them join us for the ISS contact.

Special callsign GB4YOTA will also be activated by ARISS for a special contact with one of the astronauts on board the International Space Station.

Participants will ask as many of the following questions as time allows:

1. Do any of you experiment with ham radio in your free time when you are not obligated to work up there?

2. Typically, how many ham-radio operators are there on the ISS?

3. For ARISS contacts, what frequency bands, and how much power is used to communicate with the ground stations?

4. What are some of the challenges with sending live HD video from space?

5. How important do you consider your interest in amateur radio to your set of technical skills?

6. What would you say to encourage YOTA attendees to continue with their interest in radio?

7. How important is the amateur radio/ham radio setup to ISS backup communications?

8. How do you maintain communications with the worldwide mission control centres?

9. How many different types of communication systems does the ISS have?

10. (ONLY IF HAMTV IS ACTIVE) Can you show us your favourite trick with a water droplet?

11. Do you experience any ionizing phenomena in space that affects the wave propagation in a POSITIVE or NEGATIVE way?

12. When using amateur radio/ham communication equipment in space, what kind of problems can cause difficulties How are these resolved?

13. We are talking via voice (and video?). Can you use other modes, such as straight CW-keys onboard the ISS?

14. What are the main differences between a contact with a ham ground station and a space agency ground station?

15. What are the differences between the HDEV (High Definition Earth Viewing) camera and HamTV?”

16. How many cargo supply ships are docked with the ISS at the moment and do they change the pattern of earth facing communications?”

17. How do you see the ham radio system developing in the next decade?

18. Does everything go according to plan or do parts break and need replacement. If so, do you have a repair facility on board?

19. In space, can you use social media and messaging with others in the same way we use it on Earth?

20. How does the oxygen and electricity production work on board of a spaceship?

21. In which direction do plants grow onboard the space station?

22. What do you do in case of a fire onboard the ISS?

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoARISS is an international educational outreach program partnering the volunteer support and leadership from AMSAT and IARU societies around the world with the ISS space agencies partners: NASA, Russian Space Agency, ESA, JAXA, and CSA.

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers on board the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology, and learning.

Source Gaston Bertels ON4WF ARISS Europe

Event webstream https://ariss.batc.tv/

Youngsters On The Air (YOTA) 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Press Release YOTA 2017 Gilwell Park – PDF download here

You can listen to the ISS using an Online Radio – Select Frequency of 145800.0 kHz and Mode FM:
• SUWS WebSDR when ISS in range of London http://websdr.suws.org.uk/
• R4UAB WebSDR when ISS is over Russia
Check the ISS Fan Club site to see when the ISS is in range http://issfanclub.com/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Young radio hams to talk to ISS astronaut

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA

Some of the young radio amateurs attending the YOTA 2017 event at Gilwell Park will get the chance to talk to astronaut Paulo Nespoli IZ0JPA on the International Space Station using amateur radio.

Paulo will be operating the amateur radio station NA1SS in the Columbus module of the ISS and will to talk to attendees at the Youngsters On The Air 2017 event taking place at Gilwell Park on the Essex/London border. The callsign of the Gilwell Park station will be GB4YOTA and the contact is planned to take place at 1838 GMT on Tuesday, August 8.

The RSGB are hosting YOTA 2017 the prestigious IARU international summer camp at Gilwell Park, the UK Scouting HQ, on August 5-12, 2017.

There will be 80 young people under the age of 26 from 30 countries – from all over IARU Region 1 (Europe/Africa) as well as Japan — representing their national amateur radio societies at this event.

By taking part in a mix of amateur radio and intercultural activities, the young people will be able to build relationships with like-minded people from other countries and develop international friendships through amateur radio—and have a lot of fun!

YOTA 2017 http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/yota-2017/

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/contact-the-iss.html

AMSAT-UK: https://amsat-uk.org/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/AmsatUK
Facebook: https://facebook.com/AmsatUK
YouTube: https://youtube.com/AmsatUK

Press reports ISS success of Chertsey Radio Club

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The Surrey press report radio amateurs at the Chertsey Radio Club received test transmissions by two satellites inside the International Space Station (ISS). The club also received ISS Slow Scan Television images.

On July 5, the Space Station sent greeting messages in Russian, English, Spanish and Chinese, which were picked up by club members. The messages were sent during test transmissions from two small educational Russian amateur radio satellites, known as Tanusha-1 and Tanusha-2. They will be deployed from the ISS during a spacewalk in August.

As part of the celebrations for the 20th Anniversary of Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS), the ISS sent a set of 12 images using slow scan television (SSTV). The transmissions took place over four days from July 20.

Chertsey Radio Club member James Preece M0JFP was able to receive the signal and convert them into images using a Raspberry Pi 3.

Read the article at
http://www.getsurrey.co.uk/news/surrey-news/surrey-radio-enthusiasts-make-contact-13396651

Chertsey Radio Club ISS SSTV on Raspberry Pi
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-decoded-on-raspberry-pi3.html
http://chertseyradioclub.blogspot.co.uk/2017/07/iss-sstv-0058-uk-celebrating-20-years.html

Follow Chertsey Radio Club https://twitter.com/chertseyRC

Summer is a great time to get publicity for amateur radio
http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/june/summer-is-a-great-time-to-get-publicity-for-ham-radio.htm

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find a short Amateur Radio Foundation training course at https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

Packet Module status on board ISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoARISS has received several reports stating that the packet radio system on ISS is down. Here is what we know and our current forward plan.

The packet system in the Columbus module started to act up late last week, sending only a beacon. The ARISS team requested a power recycle by the crew, and with that power recycle, the packet system appears to have stop functioning completely. Note that this unit has been on-orbit for 17 years. It was launched on the STS-106 Space Shuttle Atlantis mission in September 2000 and was built, tested and certified for flight about 20 years ago.

The ARISS team has had some extensive discussions on the way forward. We would first like to do some additional troubleshooting with the existing packet module. It will take some time (weeks) to develop troubleshooting procedures, get the procedures approved by NASA and then conduct the tests with the crew. This includes an additional power cycle. The turnaround time is much longer than usual because a new crew will soon be arriving on ISS. The current crew is focused on the new crew arrival and there will be about a one- to two-week transition after the new crew arrives. On the positive side, one aspect of our troubleshooting-a second power cycle-will occur automatically because ARISS is shut down during crew docking and turned on afterwards. However, there will be more to our troubleshooting than just the power cycle.

We have some additional plans with alternative solutions, but those are currently being discussed and prioritized within the ARISS team. All solutions will require international ARISS team coordination, additional procedures and crew interaction. People who have carefully followed ISS operations know that crew time continues to evolve with the more extensive research that is occurring on-board. Suffice it to say, it will take longer than what it has taken in the past to work through this issue.

The above information is to make sure that ARISS properly sets expectations on how long it will take to resolve this. At this point, expect a few months with no ARISS packet.

As you all can see, deploying the Interoperable Radio system that is currently under development by ARISS has become even more critically important. The ARISS team is laser focused on getting that system developed and deployed. We are conducting a final design review with NASA on this system next week. But we cannot get to the finish line without your help. If you can, please consider a donation to the ARISS radio fund by clicking on the ARISS donate button on the ARISS web page. All donations, large and small are appreciated http://www.ariss.org/donate.html

On behalf of ARISS, we thank you for your sustained interest and support of our program.

Sincerely,

Frank H. Bauer, KA3HDO
ARISS International Chair

About ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies and amateur radio.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
https://www.facebook.com/Amateur-Radio-on-the-International-Space-Station-ARISS-153679794647788/

QIKCOM-1 team expect Eclipse day ISS deployment

International Space Station – Image Credit NASA

The US Naval Academy team say their amateur radio QIKCOM-1 APRS Digipeater payload may be deployed from the International Space Station on August 21.

The QIKCOM-1 page says:

The Ham Radio QIKCOM-1 module attached to the NovaWurks NanoRacks SIMPL spacecraft is now finally scheduled for release from the ISS on 21 August 2017!

This is being released on the same day as the solar Eclipse when the ISS will also be passing over the USA during the eclipse 2 hour window around 1800z. We are not clear on any correlation with the Eclipse and our release, but there will be lots of hams in the field and it is a good day to tune in!

Read about QIKCOM-1 at http://aprs.org/qikcom-1.html

ARISS Celebrates its 20th Anniversary through SSTV Event

ISS SSTV image 2 received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

ISS SSTV image 2 received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

In commemoration of the 20th Anniversary of ARISS, a Slow Scan Television (SSTV) event is planned for Thursday, July 20 starting around 21:25 UT.

Update 2017-07-21: Crew schedule now indicates activity will conclude at 18:00 UT on Monday, July 24.

The event plans to feature images from ARISS activities both past and present. This opportunity should cover most of the world during the operation period.

The event plans to use a computer on the ISS Russian Segment, which stores images that are then transmitted to Earth using the ham radio, specifically the onboard Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver. Those receiving the images can post them at https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/ for viewing by the public.

The 20 year history of ARISS will be displayed through a collection of 12 unique images sharing the amazing accomplishments of ARISS over the last two decades. SSTV signals will be sent to earth at 145.800 MHz using FM. The SSTV mode of transmission is expected to be PD 120 (PD 180 may be a second option). The event is expected to continue over a two day period.

Since it’s inception, Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has provided students an opportunity, through ham radio, to engage in conversation with orbiting astronauts and inspired many to seek careers in science, technology, engineering and math. Consider how you might inspire students in your area through this chance to capture images directly from space to their computers.

Please note that the event, and any ARISS event, is dependent on other activities, schedules and crew responsibilities on the ISS and are subject to change at any time.

While preparations are being finalized please check for new and the most current information on the ARISS website or  Twitter, or Facebook or  the AMSAT Bulletin Board for the latest information on this event.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAbout ARISS

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is a cooperative venture of international amateur radio societies and the space agencies that support the International Space Station (ISS). In the United States, sponsors are the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation (AMSAT), the American Radio Relay League (ARRL), the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary goal of ARISS is to promote exploration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics by organizing scheduled contacts via amateur radio between crew members aboard the ISS and students in classrooms or informal education venues. With the help of experienced amateur radio volunteers, ISS crews speak directly with large audiences in a variety of public forums. Before and during these radio contacts, students, teachers, parents, and communities learn about space, space technologies and amateur radio. For more information, see

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS)
http://www.ariss.org/
https://twitter.com/ARISS_status
https://www.facebook.com/Amateur-Radio-on-the-International-Space-Station-ARISS-153679794647788/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Note the ISS transmissions on 145.800 MHz FM use the 5 kHz deviation standard rather than the narrow 2.5 kHz used in Europe. If your transceiver has selectable FM filters try the wider filter.

The ISS Fan Club website will show you when the space station is in range http://www.issfanclub.com/

Useful links on receiving SSTV from the ISS https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ARISS-SSTV Images http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.co.uk/

Listen to the ISS online when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR

Listen to the ISS online when in range of London with the SUWS WebSDR http://websdr.suws.org.uk/

The RSGB produce a handy Media Guide and Template press release, see
http://rsgb.org/main/clubs/media-guide-for-affiliated-societies/

If you receive a full or partial picture from the Space Station your Local Newspaper may like to know http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2016/july/now-is-a-great-time-to-get-ham-radio-publicity.htm

Example of the publicity you can get for the hobby by telling your Local Newspaper
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/04/15/iss-sstv-in-the-press/