MIR-SAT1 to deploy from ISS

MIR-SAT1 CubeSat

MIR-SAT1 CubeSat

The Mauritius Amateur Radio Society (MARS), is offering an Award to commemorate the deployment of the MIR-SAT1 CubeSat from the ISS, planned for June 22 at 10:55 GMT.

The award is open to all participating Radio Amateurs/SWLs worldwide and will be issued to those decoding MIR-SAT1 telemetry (TLM) and forwarding it to SatNogs.

Full details of the award and links to telemetry decoders are at
https://mars3b8.wordpress.com/2021/06/19/mir-sat1-special-award/

The deployment will be shown live on JAXA YouTube channel, the broadcast starts at 10:35 GMT on Tuesday, June 22.

The IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination page reports:

MIR-SAT1 is a 1U CubeSat mission with the following objectives:

1. Verify the performance of the on-board subsystems by receiving telemetry from the satellite and establish communication to and from the satellite (command and control).
2. Collect images of Mauritius and the Mauritian EEZ for capacity, building, experiment and research.
3. Experimental communication with other islands via the satellite (for scientific and/or emergency purposes), through a Radio Amateur digipeater payload.
4. V/U 9600bps GMSK digipeater may be open for Radio Amateur communication worldwide when the satellite not used for all above.

A downlink on 436.925 MHz has been coordinated. Decoders for the amateur radio community and schools have been developed by Chris AC2CZ and Daniel EA4GPZ and will be available in the public domain on their WEB sites/Github, Links will be provided before launch on Tweeter, AMSAT-BB and Space Mauritius, see
https://spacemauritius.com/#telemetry

For the digipeater operation it will be necessary to evaluate the power available after deployment to decide on opening same 24/7 or on scheduled time.

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination pages http://amsat.org.uk/iaru/

Follow 3B8DU on Twiiter at https://twitter.com/3b8du

ISS repeater remaining on until after Field Day

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoThe International Space Station crossband FM repeater should remain active until after the Field Day weekend of June 26-27.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) has decided to keep its ARISS InterOperable Radio System (IORS) in crossband repeater mode until after ARRL Field Day ends. The IORS ham station is located in the Columbus Module of the International Space Station.

ARRL HQ Contest Program Manager Paul Bourque, N1SFE, has confirmed that successful radio contacts made through the ARISS IORS, in crossband repeater mode, will count for an ARRL Field Day QSO point, but also for Field Day bonus points! Another fun opportunity for points. Don’t forget the rule limiting stations to 1 QSO per any single channel FM satellite.

On-orbit astronauts always have very busy schedules, but if a voice contact were to be made with them, it would count for QSO credit but not for satellite bonus points. Only an ARISS crossband repeater QSO qualifies for the bonus. Crossband repeater contacts are also valid for AMSAT Field Day for satellite operations, held concurrently with the ARRL event.

Frequencies for ARISS crossband repeater operation are as follows: 145.990 MHz up, 67 Hz tone and 437.800 MHz down. If you haven’t used the ISS repeater yet, be sure to practice with it before Field Day (June 26-27, 2021). These contacts can be tricky, but hams can practice right now…can you do it?

ARISS had planned a mode switch to APRS packet during the second week of June. Now, ARISS is targeting the switch by the astronauts to packet after the first ARISS school contact following ARRL Field Day. In more news for ARISS supporters: the astronauts will power down the ARISS radio station during USA spacewalks on June 16 and June 20, 2021.

ARISS – Celebrating 20 Years of Amateur Radio Continuous Operations on the ISS
https://ariss.org/

ISS SSTV 145.800 FM June 9-10  

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Russian cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are planning to transmit Slow Scan TV images on 145.800 MHz FM using the SSTV mode PD-120.

The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be made from the amateur radio station RS0ISS in the Russian Service module of the ISS using a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver.

June 09, 2021 (Wednesday) from 09:35 GMT until 13:50 GMT*

June 10, 2021 (Thursday) from 08:55 GMT until 15:50 GMT*

*Dates and times subject to change.

The signal should be receivable on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Amateur radio satellites deploy March 14

BIRDS-4 Satellite DeploymentEight satellites, all coordinated by the IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Panel, are planned to be deployed from the International Space Station on Sunday, March 14.

ISS CubeSat deployment on March 14, 2021 - image by astronaut Soichi Noguchi KD5TVP

ISS CubeSat deployment on March 14, 2021 – image by astronaut Soichi Noguchi KD5TVP

The deployment should be streamed live on YouTube, watch from 09:15 GMT [UPDATE deployment now expected after 10:30 GMT]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLltILh8SLw

The CubeSats being deployed are:
• OPUSAT-II
• GuaraniSat‑1 (BIRDS‑4)
• Maya‑2 (BIRDS‑4)
• Tsuru (BIRDS‑4)
• RSP-01
• WARP-01
• TAUSAT‑1
• STARS-EC

It is understood the BIRDS-4 satellites are carrying digipeaters and TAUSAT‑1 has an FM transponder. Further information including the IARU coordinated frequencies are at http://amsat.org.uk/iaru/

 

ISS SSTV 145.800 FM Jan 28-29

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Russian cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are planning to transmit Slow Scan TV images on 145.800 MHz FM using the SSTV mode PD-120.

The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be made from the amateur radio station RS0ISS in the Russian Service module of the ISS.

Jan 28 – Starts after 12:10 GMT and ends at 17:15 GMT*

Jan 29 – Start about 13:10 GMT and ends at 18:05 GMT*

*Dates and times subject to change.

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ISS Slow Scan TV event 145.800 MHz FM

ISS SSTV image received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

ISS SSTV image received by Mike Rupprecht DK3WN April 12, 2016 at 1556 UT

An ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) event is scheduled from the International Space Station (ISS) for December 24-31.

This will be a special SSTV event to celebrate the 20th anniversary of ARISS operations on the ISS.

The event is scheduled to begin on December 24 from 16:40 GMT and continue until December 31 ending at 18:15 GMT. Dates and times subject to change due to ISS operational adjustments.

Images will be transmitted on 145.800 MHz FM +/- 3 kHz Doppler shift and the expected SSTV mode of operation is PD 120.

If your radio has selectable FM filters then for best results try selecting the wider filter designed for 25 kHz channel spacing.

ARISS SSTV Blog http://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Post and view images on the ARISS SSTV Gallery https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

ARISS SSTV Award: After your image is posted at the gallery, you can acquire a special award by linking to https://ariss.pzk.org.pl/sstv/ and follow directions for submitting a digital copy of your received image.

ISS SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) https://www.ariss.org/