Summer 2022 OSCAR News now available to download

2022-06 Oscar News Front CoverE-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the Summer 2022 edition of OSCAR News, issue 238, here.

The paper edition edition will be sent to postal members and should arrive in the next 2-3 weeks.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• CelesTrak Changing Domain Used
• Our thanks to – Frank Heritage M0AEU
• Retirement Letter
• FUNcubes update June 2022
• FUNcube-Next
• STAR-XL: Student Transponder for Satellite Ranging on X & L-band
• First flight of Vega-C
• New HO-113 AMSAT Distance Record Set
• Satlist a valuable resource!
• Satellite Operations from the Gambia
• Electromagnetic Field
• G3OUA Works CN88
• Increase in Satellite activity from Jersey
• GB70U Guernsey
• IARU Region 1 Satellite Coordinator’s report
• ARISS Women in Space SSTV Activity

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download the quarterly publication OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

NASA Podcast – Amateur Space Radio

Houston We Have a Podcast - Amateur Space RadioOn Episode 251 of NASA’s Houston We Have a Podcast, Courtney Black describes the Amateur Radio program that connects astronauts in space to people and students around the globe.

This episode was recorded on May 27, 2022.

On this podcast we bring in the experts, scientists, engineers, and astronauts, all to let you know what’s going on in the world of human spaceflight. Along with jam-packed days of science and maintenance, astronauts aboard the International Space Station dedicate some time to connect with people on Earth. It can be by an IP (internet protocol) phone to call a family member, a televised event to connect with media, or even amateur radio to connect with students.

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, helps create education opportunities that inspire students to pursue careers in STEM-related fields – -that’s engineering, math, science, or technology — by having the opportunity to talk to crew members on orbit. Today, we hear the story of a former teacher who has seen first-hand how ARISS communication impacts students’ lives here on Earth, and how important this program is for future generations of space explorers.

Courtney Black is an education project manager with the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory. Before joining the National Lab, Black served as a formal educator for 14 years, educating elementary to high school students. Her passion for incorporating space education in lessons earned her recognition among her peers and allowed for students to participate in once in a lifetime opportunities, such as ARISS contacts and a downlink with the International Space Station.

Black is a Space Station Ambassador, a Solar System Ambassador, teacher liaison to the Space Foundation, Space Center Houston SEEC (Space Educator Expedition Crew) crew member, and an education, an educator member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the Civil Air Patrol.

Black has presented at multiple conferences and is excited to continue presenting on topics to help bring awareness and encourage utilization of a myriad of resources available which aim to improve life on Earth through the investigation and exploration of space.

And of course, we’re very excited to have her share these resources on today’s episode of Houston We Have a Podcast. So let’s get right into it. Enjoy.

Listen to the podcast at

 

Source: NASA Podcast Episode 251 https://nasa.gov/johnson/HWHAP/amateur-space-radio

ISS SSTV June 8-9 145.800 MHz FM

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Russian cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are planning to transmit Slow Scan TV (SSTV) images on 145.800 MHz FM probably using the SSTV mode PD-120.

Update June 8: There were no reports of any SSTV transmissions being received.

The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be made from the amateur radio station RS0ISS in the Russian ISS Service module (Zvezda). This will be the first time the experiment will use the recently installed Kenwood D710GA.

• June 8 Setup and activation 09:45-10:15 GMT, stop about 15:00 GMT*
• June 9 start about 08:35 GMT, stop about 16:15 GMT*

*Dates and times may be subject to change.

The signal should be receivable on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ARISS SSTV Event April 11-13

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAn ARISS Slow Scan TV (SSTV) event is scheduled from the International Space Station (ISS) April 11-13 on 145.800 MHz FM to celebrate Cosmonautics Day and Women in Space

The event is slated to begin on April 11 at 17:25 UTC for setup and operation and continue until April 13 ending at 12:00 UTC. These times are tentative and are subject to change due to crew availability.

Images will be downlinked at 145.8 MHz +/- 3 kHz for Doppler shift and the expected SSTV mode of operation is PD-120.

The theme for this event will be celebrating Cosmonautics Day and Women in Space.

Radio enthusiasts participating in the event can post and view images on the ARISS SSTV Gallery at https://www.spaceflightsoftware.com/ARISS_SSTV/

Source ARISS

The signal should be receivable even on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ISS SSTV April 7-8 145.800 MHz FM

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Russian cosmonauts on the International Space Station (ISS) are planning to transmit Slow Scan TV (SSTV) images on 145.800 MHz FM probably using the SSTV mode PD-120.

The transmissions are part of the Moscow Aviation Institute SSTV experiment (MAI-75) and will be made from the amateur radio station RS0ISS in the Russian ISS Service module (Zvezda) using a Kenwood TM-D710E transceiver.

• April 7 start about 08:00 GMT, stop about 15:35 GMT*
• April 8 start about 08:40 GMT, stop about 16:10 GMT*

*Dates and times may be subject to change.

The signal should be receivable on a handheld with a 1/4 wave whip. If your rig has selectable FM filters try the wider filter for 25 kHz channel spacing.

You can get predictions for the ISS pass times at https://www.amsat.org/track/

ARISS SSTV Blog https://ariss-sstv.blogspot.com/

Useful SSTV info and links https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

ARISS Europe to Perform Special Digital SSTV Experiment

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) logoAmateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) is planning for a special SSTV experiment. ARISS is the group that puts together special amateur radio contacts between students around the globe and crew members with ham radio licenses on the International Space Station (ISS) and develops and operates the amateur radio equipment on ISS.

As part of its ARISS 2.0 initiative, the ARISS International team is expanding its educational and life-long learning opportunities for youth and ham radio operators around the world. ARISS Slow Scan Television (SSTV), which is the transmission of images from ISS using amateur radio, is a very popular ARISS mode of operation. To expand ARISS SSTV capabilities, the ARISS Europe and ARISS USA teams plan to perform special SSTV Experiments using a new SSTV digital coding scheme. For the signal reception, the software “KG-STV” is required, as available on internet.

We kindly request that the amateur radio community refrain from the use of the voice repeater thin this SSTV experiment on February 20, 2022, over Europe.

This is a unique and official ARISS experiment. We kindly request keeping the voice repeater uplink free from other voice transmissions during the experiment time period. Also note that ARISS is temporarily employing the voice repeater to expedite these experiments and make a more permanent, more expansive SSTV capability fully operational on other downlink frequencies.

The first experiment in the series will utilize ARISS approved ground stations in Europe that will transmit these digital SSTV signals. These will be available for all in the ISS footprint when SSTV transmissions occur. The first SSTV experiment is planned for February 20, 2022, between 05:10 UTC and 12:00 UTC for five ISS passes over Europe. Please be aware that this event depends on ARISS IORS radio availabilities and ISS crew support, so last-minute changes may occur.

To promote quick experimental SSTV investigations—to learn and improve–the ARISS team will employ the ISS Kenwood radio in its cross-band repeater mode. The crossband repeater operates on a downlink of 437.800 MHz. Each transmission sequence will consist of 1:40 minute transmission, followed by 1:20 minute pause and will be repeated several times within an ISS pass over Europe.

The used modulation is MSK w/o error correction. For the decoding of the 320 x 240 px image, the software KG-STV is required. The KG-STV software can be downloaded from the following link:
http://amsat-nl.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/kgstv_ISS.zip

The ZIP file contains the KG-STV program, an installation and setup manual, some images and MP3 audio samples for your first tests as well as links for additional technical information about the KG-STV use.

The members of the ham radio community youth and the public are invited to receive and decode these special SSTV signals.

Experiment reports are welcome and should be uploaded to “sstvtest@amsat-on.be”

More information will be available on the AMSAT-NL.org web page:
https://amsat-nl.org/?page_id=568

(for the team: Oliver Amend, DG6BCE)