PocketQube Workshop videos available

3rd PocketQube Workshop GlasgowThe 3rd PocketQube Satellite Workshop, hosted by Alba Orbital, was held September 5-6, 2019, in Glasgow. Talks given at the event are now available on YouTube.

Among the presenters were:
• Stuart Robinson GW7HPW, $50SAT Team
• Julian Fernandez EA4HCD, Fossasat-1
• Zac Manchester KD2BHC, Chipsats
• Constantin Constantinides MM6XOM, Unicorn-2

Talk schedule and PDF slides at http://www.albaorbital.com/3rd-pocketqube-workshop

Watch the videos at https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7qrB8LwUKBhszyEVAUuL8kvgoA8eu4JG

Alba Orbital https://twitter.com/AlbaOrbital

Early Progress, Contention on Difficult Issues Mark First Week of WRC

ITU WRC-19 posterSharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, November 1, 2019 – Week 1 of the 2019 World Radiocommunication Conference saw agreement reached on several issues on which discussions prior to the conference had revealed consensus. Those were the easy ones; the rest will be more difficult.

The early decisions here in Sharm El-Sheikh were only possible because of countless hours of work conducted within the ITU Radiocommunication Sector and the six regional telecommunications organizations (RTOs) since the previous WRC in 2015. Three of these decisions were on issues of interest to the IARU.

IARU Team at WRC-19

IARU Team at WRC-19

The band 47.0-47.2 GHz was allocated solely to the amateur and amateur-satellite services by the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference. Commercial wireless broadband interests had expressed some interest in the band being designated for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and there was some concern that such a proposal might be made at WRC-19. The fact that none was forthcoming was due in part to the work of the IARU at the Conference Preparatory Meeting earlier this year and in the RTOs. The WRC has agreed to “no change” (NOC) at 47.0-47.2 GHz.

Another NOC decision that avoided impact on the amateur service applies to the band 5850-5925 MHz, which is an amateur secondary allocation in Region 2. Consideration of proposals involving other parts of spectrum in the 5-GHz range will take much longer.

Finally, the WRC has agreed to make no frequency allocations or other changes to the Radio Regulations to accommodate Wireless Power Transmission for electric vehicles (WPT-EV). Much more work remains to be done on an urgent basis in the ITU and other standards organizations if radiocommunication services are to be adequately protected from harmful interference that may be generated by WPT-EV, both at the fundamental frequency and from unwanted emissions.

ITU WRC-19 LogoConsideration of a 50 MHz allocation in Region 1 to harmonize the allocations in the three Regions was the subject of spirited debate in a Sub Working Group chaired by Dale Hughes, VK1DSH, of the Australian delegation. The four RTOs in Region 1 made disparate proposals to the conference and a small group of administrations proposed NOC. For three days there was no progress toward a consensus solution but that changed on Friday morning. An agreement has been reached, subject to confirmation by the regional groups, that will provide administrations in Region 1 with flexibility in how to accommodate their amateurs.

One of the most difficult issues facing WRC-19 is to develop an agenda for WRC-23. There are dozens of proposals for agenda items and they cannot all be accommodated within available ITU resources. The substantive work of considering these proposals began on Friday afternoon and must be completed over the next two weeks.

Some meetings on the more difficult issues are scheduled for Saturday, November 2. Delegates have been warned to expect more intensive use of weekend and evening hours as the conference proceeds toward its conclusion on November 22.

Source IARU http://iaru.org/

CEPT ECC report on WRC-19 Week 1
https://www.cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/client/introduction/weekly-report-from-wrc-19

For daily updates see the RSGB WRC-19 Blog
https://rsgb.org/main/blog/category/news/special-focus/wrc-19/

Report on Es’hail-2 / QO-100 geostationary satellite carrying amateur radio

Es'hail-2 Qatar-OSCAR-100Videos of the presentations given at the AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium, which was held as part of the RSGB Convention in Milton Keynes, October 12-13, 2019, are being made available on YouTube.

A recent release is the talk on the geostationary satellite Es’hail-2 / QO-100 activities of AMSAT-DL given by Achim Vollhardt DH2VA, this is followed by the awarding of the RSGB Louis Varney Cup to Peter Gülzow DB2OS.

Other presentations are expected to be uploaded in the coming weeks.

Watch Report on the Es’hail-2 – QO-100 activities by Achim Vollhardt DH2VA

AMSAT-UK videos on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

Our thanks to the British Amateur Television Club and Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG for their work in recording, editing and uploading these videos.

Inspiring Youth with Science in Space

Astronaut Sunita Williams KD5PLB answers questions from a student using amateur radio

Astronaut Sunita Williams KD5PLB answers questions from a student using amateur radio

NASA highlight the role of amateur radio in letting young people speak directly with astronauts and cosmonauts on the International Space Station:

An ARISS contact takes place as a part of a comprehensive suite of education activities. To prepare for an exchange, students study the space station and the research conducted there. They also learn about wireless technology, radio science, and satellite communication used for space exploration.

The space station must pass over these earthbound communicators during amateur radio transmissions in order to relay signals between the space station’s ham radio and ground receivers. Other factors affect the timing of scheduled contacts, including weather, crew availability, and the schedules of visiting vehicles.

These ham radio conversations usually last about 10 minutes. Crew members answer questions from students as they and community members look on. During a pass, the crew can answer an average of 18 questions, depending on their complexity.

Ham radio on the space station connects and inspires students in four ways: providing first-hand education about life in space, directly connecting students with space station crew, sharing amateur radio technologies, and building global partnerships.

Read the full NASA story at
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/b4h-3rd/ge-inspiring-youth-with-space-science

Brazil: High school students shown amateur radio

Gonçalves Dias School Students

Gonçalves Dias School Students

Brazilian radio amateurs participated in a Science Fair at Gonçalves Dias School, Boa Vista on October 16, 2019.

Paulo PV8DX used basic concepts of physics and geography when explaining amateur radio to the students. As well as theory they there were also practicals involving the students in antenna construction and contacts using the transponder on the amateur radio satellite LAPAN IO-86.

Paulo had asked AMSAT-UK FUNcube team if a special ‘Fitter‘ message could be transmitted from the FUNcube-1 (AO-73) satellite. This was arranged and the message from space was received at the school.

Watch Atividade Escolar – Ham Radio – By PV8DX

Further information on FUNcube-1 ‘Fitter’ messages and how to request one is available at https://funcube.org.uk/ground-segment/fitter-messages/

AMSAT-UK https://twitter.com/AmsatUK

AMSAT-UK Colloquium Talks on YouTube

Professor Julia Hunter-Anderson talking about WUSAT-3

Professor Julia Hunter-Anderson talking about WUSAT-3

Videos of the presentations given at the AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium, which was held as part of the RSGB Convention in Milton Keynes, October 12-13, 2019, are being made available on YouTube.

The first of the videos is the fascinating presentation on the WUSAT-3 CubeSat project given by Professor Julia Hunter-Anderson of the University of Warwick which highlights the potential use of CubeSats for wildlife tracking.

Other presentations are expected to be uploaded in the coming weeks.

Watch University of Warwick WUSAT-3

AMSAT-UK videos on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

Our thanks to the British Amateur Television Club and Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG for their work in recording, editing and uploading these videos.