Spain: Authorization for 2.4 GHz operation

Es'hail-2 Qatar-OSCAR-100Spain’s national amateur radio society URE reports the regulator has agreed to allow amateur use of 2400.050 to 2409.500 MHz to access the E’hail-2 / QO-100 geostationary satellite.

A Google translation of the URE announcement reads:

Since the State of Qatar sent the geostationary satellite Es’hail-2, the first of its kind to be used by radio amateurs, to space on November 15 of 2018, the URE satellite (AMSAT) raised the possibility of requesting the Administration the free use of the entire segment granted for radio amateurs in Spain and not only segment 2316-2332 MHz.

The Administration, responding to the request submitted by the URE, has developed the present resolution, which authorizes until September 26, 2019, to the holders of radio amateur authorizations, the emission of the amateur radio satellite service from 2400.050 to 2409.500 MHz. For single-sideband telephone communications, with a maximum eirp of 1500 watts, from authorized amateur radio stations located anywhere in the national territory.

The resolution of the Secretary of State for Digital Progress
https://www.ure.es/images/noticias/generales/RESOLUCION-Es-hai.pdf

URE in Google English https://tinyurl.com/SpainURE

Es’hail-2 QO-100 https://amsat-uk.org/satellites/geo/eshail-2/

AMSAT Files Comments in FCC Orbital Debris Mitigation Proceeding

Amateur Radio Satellites - To inspire, engage and educate the next generation

Amateur Radio Satellites – To inspire, engage and educate the next generation

AMSAT believes several of FCC’s proposed rule changes concerning orbital debris would have an extremely detrimental affect on the amateur satellite service.

The AMSAT News Service Reports:

The Federal Communications Commission has proposed several rules changes related to the amateur satellite service as part of a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) related to the mitigation of orbital debris. AMSAT believes several of these rule changes would have an extremely detrimental affect on the amateur satellite service and AMSAT’s ability to launch and operate new satellites, including AMSAT’s upcoming GOLF satellites.

Today, AMSAT filed comments on the proposed rulemaking. In the comments, AMSAT argues that amateur satellites often have longer mission lifespans than other small satellite missions and that the Commission should take a mission duration of 5 to 10 years into account when determining whether or not an amateur satellite will meet the orbital debris regulations by transferring to a parking orbit or re-entering the atmosphere within 25 years of mission completion. The current practice is to assume a “zero year” mission and to require that amateur satellites either transfer to a parking orbit or re-enter within 25 years following launch.

AMSAT also urged the Commission to consider alternatives to a proposed rule that would restrict satellites in Low Earth Orbit that plan to meet the orbital debris mitigation guidelines through atmospheric re-entry to altitudes of 650 km or less. AMSAT noted that, had this rule been in place, AO-85 and AO-91 would not have been able to be deployed in their current ellipitcal orbits with apogees of approximately 800 km, despite the fact that both of these satellites will re-enter within 25 years due to their low perigees. Additionally, AMSAT noted that current plans for the GOLF-1 satellite are to meet orbital debris mitigation guidelines through atmospheric re-entry by deploying a drag device that will ensure re-entry within 25 years despite deployment at an altitude of above 1,000 km. This proposed rule would prohibit GOLF-1’s deployment at that altitude.

The Commission’s proposed rules would also require that amateur satellite licensees indemnify the government against any claims made against the United States due to the operation of the satellite. AMSAT believes this proposal would end the ability of AMSAT, or any other entity in the United States, to launch and operate amateur satellites and urges the Commission to consider alternatives, such as establishing a fund to pay any such claims, noting that the likelihood of such a claim is low.

For amateur satellites with propulsion, the Commission proposes a rule that would require any command links as well as satellite telemetry be encrypted. While AMSAT understands and agrees that a satellite carrying a propulsion system must have an encrypted command link, the proposal to require all satellite telemetry be encrypted is unnecessary and counter to the spirit of the amateur service. AMSAT notes that open access to telemetry is expected of amateur satellites and is critical to the educational component of amateur radio satellites.

Finally, AMSAT proposes that the Commission exempt amateur space stations co-located on other spacecraft from the orbital debris mitigation regulations, including any indemnification rule. Noting that AMSAT has pursued opportunities to fly a payload as a rideshare aboard government or commercial satellites, AMSAT argues that, as the satellite’s owner will need to meet orbital debris mitigation requirements to obtain the license in the primary mission’s service, requiring the amateur licensee to meet the orbital debris mitigation requirements as well is redundant. AMSAT proposes that Part 97 be amended to state that amateur space stations co-located on spacecraft with space stations authorized under Part 25 of the Commission’s regulations (for commercial spacecraft) or by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) (for government spacecraft) are exempt from these regulations.

AMSAT’s comments as filed may be downloaded at https://tinyurl.com/ANS-095-Comments

The NPRM is International Bureau Docket #18-313 and is available at
https://docs.fcc.gov/public/attachments/FCC-18-159A1.pdf

Interested parties may file reply comments by May 5th at https://www.fcc.gov/ecfs/

[ANS thanks AMSAT Executive Vice President Paul Stoetzer, N8HM, for
the above information]

Register for AMSAT News Service emails at https://www.amsat.org/mailman/listinfo/ans

Ham radio APRS payload to launch April 1

PSLV-C45 orbital platform PS4

PSLV-C45 orbital platform PS4

An APRS payload from AMSAT INDIA will be flown on the PSLV-C45 mission expected to launch on April 1, 2019 at 03:57 GMT.

On the AMSAT Bulletin Board Nitin VU3TYG writes:

The payload will be powered on approximately over Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland, Poland and Moscow. We request stations at these locations to report the first signals on 145.825 MHz from the payload.

We also request the Amateur Radio fraternity worldwide to use the payload and Satgates to feed the traffic. More details about this unique project as well as the prelaunch TLE are available at
http://www.amsatindia.org/

73
Nitin [VU3TYG] Secretary, AMSAT INDIA
https://twitter.com/amsatindia

It is understood the PSLV-C45 mission will deploy 29 satellites. The 4th stage of the rocket (PS4) will become an orbital platform in a 485 km orbit hosting three payloads:
• Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) digipeater from AMSAT INDIA
• Automatic Identification System (AIS) from ISRO
• Advanced Retarding Potential Analyzer for Ionospheric Studies (ARIS) from the Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST).
https://www.isro.gov.in/launcher/pslv-c45-emisat-mission

ISS SSTV transmissions April 1-2

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

ISS SSTV MAI-75 image 9/12 received by Chertsey Radio Club on Baofeng handheld

Dmitry R4UAB reports cosmonauts on the International Space Station will again be transmitting SSTV images, April 1-2, on 145.800 MHz FM as part of the Inter-MAI-75 experiment.

A Google translation reads:

“Inter-MAI-75” (Education and promotion of space research) – an experiment aimed at combining the efforts of educational universities and radio amateurs in Russia and the United States to develop technology and technical tools that enable students to communicate and collaborate with astronauts and astronauts in the study and development of the management process ISS, as well as to work out various methods of transmission and various types of transmitted information (text, voice and telemetry information, black and white and color photos and video from blasts, etc.), obtained as a result of scientific and educational experiments through the use of amateur radio communications onboard the ISS.

SSTV images will be transmitted at a frequency of 145.800 MHz using a Kenwood TM-D710 transceiver. They are expected to use the PD-120 SSTV format.

Schedule:
• Monday, April 1, 2019 from about 1400 to about 1900 GMT
• Tuesday, April 2, 2019 from about 1400 to about 1900 GMT

Listen to the ISS when it is over Russia with the R4UAB WebSDR http://websdr.r4uab.ru/

Source R4UAB https://r4uab.ru/2019/03/25/s-borta-mks-1-i-2-aprelya-2019-goda-budut-peredavat-izobrazheniya-sstv-v-ramkah-eksperimenta-inter-mai-75/

ISS SSTV https://amsat-uk.org/beginners/iss-sstv/

Spring issue of OSCAR News now available for download

Oscar News issue 225 March 2019

Oscar News issue 225 March 2019

E-members of AMSAT-UK can now download the Spring 2019 edition of OSCAR News, issue 225, here.

The paper edition should be sent to postal members in 2-3 weeks.

In this issue:
• From the Secretary’s Keyboard
• Editors welcome
• 2019 Meetings & Events Calendar
• Fox-1Cliff/AO-95 Receive Anomaly
• Situation Awareness
• Easy Sats and HTs
• AMSAT SA Dual Band VHF/UHF Antenna
• A Mini Satellite-Antenna Rotator
• SARCNET Portable Antenna Rotator
• ‘Patch’ Feed for S-Band Dish Antennas
• NRC visitors during Science Week
• Astro Pi, Brownies and SSTV
• Goonhilly Earth Station
• A new era for Amateur Radio
• Simple dual band dish feed for Es’hail-2 / QO-100
• Update: New patch feed with horn
• D-STAR One
• OrigamiSat-1
• Spaceflight SSO-A: SmallSat Express Mission
• Nexus
• NEXUS designated as Fuji-OSCAR 99

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

Membership of AMSAT-UK is open to anyone who has an interest in amateur radio satellites or space activities, including the International Space Station (ISS).

E-members of AMSAT-UK are able to download OSCAR News as a convenient PDF that can be read on laptops, tablets or smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere. Join as an E-member at Electronic (PDF) E-membership

PDF sample copy of “Oscar News” here.

Join AMSAT-UK using PayPal, Debit or Credit card at
http://shop.amsat-uk.org/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News here.

Ham radio geostationary satellite talks at Martlesham

BT Adastral Park - credit BT

BT Adastral Park – credit BT

This year’s premier Amateur Radio Microwave Event will take place at BT Adastral Park, Martlesham, Suffolk on April 13-14, Everyone is welcome to attend and entry is free but you must pre-register.

The talks are being held on the Sunday, April 14, and they include:
• Equipment for the Es’Hail-2 / QO-100 narrowband transponder by David Bowman G0MRF
• Es’Hail-2 / QO-100 DATV wideband transponder by Noel Matthews G8GTZ
• Building your first Transceiver with GNU Radio by Heather Lomond M0HMO
• From Death Rays to Dinner: A Brief History of Microwave Engineering by William Eustace M0WJE

Entry is Free but you must Register in advance due to BT’s site access policy. Full details and booking at http://mmrt.homedns.org/

UK Microwave Group
https://microwavers.org/
https://twitter.com/UKGHZ

Groups IO UKMicrowaves https://groups.io/g/UKMicrowaves