IARU Region 3 Conference

IARU-R3 LogoThe ARRL reports on the 16th International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Region 3 triennial conference held in Bali, Indonesia, October 12-16.

Working Group 2 (WG2) dealt with such operational and technical matters as emergency communication, digital modes, a common APRS frequency, and Region 3 band plans. Titon Dutono, YB3PET, chaired WG2, and ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ, served as its secretary. In all, working group members discussed 37 papers and submitted recommendations to the conference for adoption.

Among recommendations adopted was one to ask the IARU Administrative Council to make available information on the use of the Amateur Satellite Service for member societies, satellite groups, Amateur Satellite operators, and concerned radio amateurs. This information would include, but not be limited to, criteria for a satellite to be in the Amateur Satellite Service and the procedure for IARU satellite frequency coordination.

The conference also adopted adjustments to the Region 3 band plans. Region 3 directors will consider making the format similar to that used in Regions 1 and 2.

Read the full ARRL story at
http://www.arrl.org/news/iaru-region-3-conference-opens-with-a-gong-adopts-recommendat

The Chinese Radio Sports Association / Chinese Radio Amateur Club submitted a paper titled Amateur Satellite Guide which said “Amateur satellite projects may rely on a wide range of cooperation between radio amateurs and other parties, as the consequence, the nature of the mission can be complicated. Without a set of definite criterion, the service classification of a mission may not be crystal clear to both satellite operators and other radio amateurs, especially when the radio payload supplies amateur service but also covers certain kind of other tasks.”

The CRSA/CRAC proposed “that the IARU AC shall consider to make available some information on use of the amateur satellite service for member societies, satellite groups, amateur satellite operators as well as concerned radio amateurs.”
http://www.iaru-r3.org/16r3c/docs/055r1%20Amateur%20Satellite%20Guide.docx

CRSA/CRAC paper on the number of radio amateurs – paper also notes Beijing has allocated 135.7-137.8 kHz to the Amateur Satellite Service
http://www.iaru-r3.org/16r3c/docs/054%20CRSA-CRAC%20Report.docx

The Working Group 2 report recommended a common APRS frequency of 144.390 MHz for High Altitude Balloons and terrestrial use. The Region 3 Directors will be consulting with IARU Regions 1 & 2
http://iaru-r3.org/16th-triennial-conference-of-the-iaru-r3-documents/#058

Papers submitted for the conference may be seen at
http://iaru-r3.org/16th-triennial-conference-of-the-iaru-r3-documents/

IARU Region 3 Act on Band Plan Satellite Allocations
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/08/21/iaru-region-3-act-on-band-plan-satellite/

IARU Region 3 Act on Band Plan Satellite Allocations

Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel

Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel

The IARU Region 3 (Asia/Pacific) Directors have submitted a band plan paper concerning amateur satellite allocations for consideration at the IARU Region 3 Conference which takes place October 12-16 in Bali, Indonesia.

IARU-R3 LogoThis is the 16th Conference and it will be hosted by the Amateur Radio Organisation of Indonesia (ORARI). 60 Premier and 12 Suite hotel rooms have been booked at the Sanur Paradise Plaza Hotel which is described as being situated in Sanur, the secretly sophisticated side of Bali.

ORARI plans to run a special event station YB16IARU from October 11-16 from the conference and the delegates will be taken on a tour of Bali.

The President of ORARI, Sutiyoso YB0ST, says: “It’s an exciting time for us as we continue to grow and thrive, remaining always adaptable, motivated and responsive. The world of amateur radio is an exciting area in which to work and play, and we’ll continue to meet and bring inspired people together in forums like this, to ensure IARU Region 3 remains at the cutting edge.”

The IARU Region 3 Directors have acknowledged the existing 2m band plan does not adequately define how stations in the Amateur Satellite Service may use the band. However, the changes they are proposing would appear to prohibit the use of the Amateur Satellite Service channel 144.490 MHz as an uplink for crewed space missions. Use of this channel was agreed by IARU Region 3 some 20 years ago but the new paper says:

“Note 2: The other portion of the band 144.035-145.8 MHz is exclusively identified for the amateur service.”

At the same time IARU Region 3 had agreed the crewed space mission downlink channel would be 145.800 MHz using 5 kHz deviation FM with a Doppler shift of +/- 3.5 kHz. The paper does not record this.

Read the IARU R3 Directors amateur satellite band plan paper at
http://www.iaru-r3.org/16r3c/docs/022%20Modification%20to%20R3%20Band%20Plan.docx

The Wireless Institute of Australia (WIA) have presented a satellite band plan paper, see
http://www.iaru-r3.org/16r3c/docs/023%20Changes%20to%20R3%20Bandplan.docx

Other papers submitted for the conference may be seen at
http://iaru-r3.org/16th-triennial-conference-of-the-iaru-r3-documents/

16th IARU R3 Conference http://www.iarur3conf2015.org/

IARU Coordination of Satellite Frequencies
https://amsat-uk.org/2015/08/20/iaru-coordination-of-satellite-frequencies/

IARU Coordination of Satellite Frequencies

IARU_LogoThe IARU have announced they are committed to only coordinate satellite frequencies within the internationally aligned IARU band plans.

The two metre amateur band is one of the most popular and populated bands in all the spectrum allocated to the amateur and amateur satellite services. This recently led to a request by satellite builders for coordination outside the spectrum reserved for satellites in the IARU band plans (145.800 – 146.000 MHz) as not enough channels are available to satisfy their requirements.

The IARU Satellite Adviser, Hans van de Groenendaal, ZS6AKV and his advisory panel are mandated to coordinate frequencies within the IARU band plans for amateur satellites. Coordinated frequencies must comply with band plans that are common to all three IARU Regions Satellites coordinated outside these plans could cause interference to terrestrial amateur operations in other regions. In theory satellites could be programmed so that they only operate over their country of origin.  Because satellite orbits make it difficult to pinpoint operations, spill over to other Regions may occur during parts of the orbit. Accordingly, IARU will not coordinate frequencies for satellites which are planned to operate outside the internationally aligned IARU band plans for amateur satellites.

The IARU offers frequency coordination in an effort to maximise spectrum utilisation and avoid possible interference to other satellites and ground stations.

The IARU requests that satellite groups work on a sharing plan or use other parts of the amateur service spectrum designated for satellite operation. When a large group of satellite sharing the same band are launched, they will soon drift apart which enhances the opportunity to share the same frequencies. For example, during the initial phase, just after launch, a time sharing system could be used to monitor the payloads before initialising transponders and other systems.

For instance, the 10 metre band, once popular with satellite builders, is today not significantly used. The band segment 29.300-29.510 MHz has been used for amateur-satellite downlinks for more than 40 years, beginning with Australis-OSCAR 5 in 1970 and AMSAT-OSCAR 6, AMSAT’s first communications satellite, in 1972.  The band segment was very popular for downlinks in the 1970s and 1980s.  Today, only one amateur satellite actively uses a 29 MHz downlink: AMSAT-OSCAR 7, launched in 1974 [and RS-15 on 29.3525 MHz – Editor].  While a 29 MHz downlink would not be practical for today’s very small satellites, owing to the size of the antenna required, the band could be used very practically for uplinks even with small receiving antennas, because transmitting power at the earth station is easy to obtain.  The IARU Satellite Adviser and his panel believe that the 10 metre band offers a good alternative to 2 metre uplinks

Currently the IARU team also coordinates frequencies for satellites built by universities and educational groups in an effort to maximise spectrum utilisation and mitigate any possible interference to Amateur Radio operations. The IARU is committed to work with these groups and with the ITU to find other spectrum for these satellites.

Rod Stafford W6ROD
Secretary
International Amateur Radio Union (IARU)

Two US Naval Academy satellites PSAT and BRICsat launched May 20, 2015 both have transponder uplinks on 28.120 MHz. Another US Naval Academy satellite PCSAT-2, which is currently undergoing coordination by IARU, plans to have a transponder uplink on 28.120 MHz.

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination pages http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru

IARU-R1 VHF Newsletter Released

IARU_Region_1_logoIARU Region 1 has released issue 65 of the VHF-UHF-uW newsletter, it covers WRC-15 which could affect a number of amateur radio bands.

The newsletter says agenda items at the ITU World Radiocommunication Conference includes topics that affect amateurs in the 5MHz, 5GHz, 10GHz, 24GHz and 77GHz bands.

WRC-15 decides the agenda items for the next conference (WRC-19). IARU Region 1 has proposals in CEPT concerning these potential agenda items:
• 50 MHz Amateur-Satellite Service allocation
• 3.4 GHz harmonisation

There may be a need to raise the option of a new allocation such as 1300-1310 MHz in order to mitigate restrictions that are appearing in the existing 23cm band.

Read the newsletter here

Video of FUNcube-1 demonstration at IARU-R1 conference

Graham Shirville G3VZV demonstrates FUNcube-1 with Kjetil Toresen LA8KV holding the antenna

Graham Shirville G3VZV demonstrates FUNcube-1 with Kjetil Toresen LA8KV holding the antenna

Riaan Greeff ZS4PR has released a video of the demonstration of the FUNcube-1 (AO-73) CubeSat by Graham Shirville G3VZV to delegates at the IARU Region 1 Conference in September 2014.

Watch the video Graham G3VZV demonstrates FUNcube satellite

Mats SM6EAN has posted a brief report on the Swedish Amateur Radio Society (SSA) website about the FUNcube-1 CubeSat presentation at the IARU Region 1 General Conference in Varna-Albena, Bulgaria.

The following is translated from the original Swedish post.

After the session of the VHF, UHF and Microwave C5 Committee had completed the delegates were given two interesting presentations.

Graham Shirville G3VZV did a poolside demonstration of the FUNcube-1 satellite which was launched in November 2013. Using a computer, FUNcube SDR dongle and a turnstile antenna, held by Kjetil Toresen LA8KV, he received FUNcube-1 and displayed the telemetry data on the computer screen. The satellite’s telemetry beacon on 145.935 MHz was also heard using a handheld SSB receiver.

A presentation was also made about Hamnet which is being expanded, especially in Germany. Hamnet is a high-speed multimedia network and it was discussed whether and how IARU Region 1 could support the expansion of this network.

Post by Mats SM6EAN in Swedish http://www.ssa.se/iaru-reg-1-dag-4/

FUNcube http://FUNcube.org.uk/

FUNcube SDR Dongle http://FUNcubeDongle.com/

FUNcube Yahoo Group https://amsat-uk.org/funcube/yahoo-group/

Dashboard App – Telemetry Decoder http://funcube.org.uk/working-documents/funcube-telemetry-dashboard/

Data Warehouse – Telemetry Archive http://warehouse.funcube.org.uk/

Hamnet http://hamnetdb.net/

IARU Region 1 Conference documents and pictures http://iarur1con2014.bfra.bg/

IARU Region 1 Approve Youth Budget and Satellite Allocation

Lisa Leenders PA2LS

Lisa Leenders PA2LS

The minutes of the Final Plenary, 23rd IARU Region 1 General Conference have been released.

The Conference approved these Youth budgets:
a. Youth Projects – 25,000 Swiss Francs for the years 2015, 2016 and 2017
b. Youth Working Group – 2,000 Swiss Francs for the years 2015, 2016 and 2017
One Swiss Franc is roughly equivalent to £0.65, $1.04, €0.83.

It was agreed to set up a Youth Working Group which will be Chaired for three years by Lisa Leenders, PA2LS.

A new satellite Space-to-Earth (downlink) band from 144.000 – 144.025 MHz with a maximum signal bandwidth of 2.7 kHz was agreed. This allocation is now available in all three IARU regions.

Read the minutes at
http://rsgb.org/main/files/2013/05/VA14_IARU-R1_Conference-Plenary-minutes.pdf

Additional information is in annexes/minutes which are awaiting release, check
http://rsgb.org/main/about-us/committees/spectrum-forum/sf-iaru-matters/sf-iaru-r1-conference/