PSAT PSK31 CubeSat Update May 24

PSAT PSK31 FM Downlink received by Martin G8JNJ at 1429 UT May 22, 2015 using the online SUWS WebSDR

PSAT PSK31 FM Downlink received by Martin G8JNJ at 1429 UT May 22, 2015 using the online SUWS WebSDR

Bob Bruninga WB4APR released this update on the PSAT PSK31 CubeSat on Sunday, May 24

28 MHz PSK31 Receiver Board Flight Prototype - Brno University of Technology

28 MHz PSK31 Receiver Board Flight Prototype – Brno University of Technology

The PSAT PSK31 435.350 MHz FM downlink is full quieting with 6 bars using a decent UHF Yagi. But we have not seen any users other than those using the 28.120 PSK channel on HF normally. We welcome people to experiment with it.

Everyone within the 28.120 to 28.123 MHz ten meter passband will be uplinked and heard on the 435.350 MHz downlink.

The Naval Academy’s PSAT seems healthy with plenty of power (we are keeping the APRS digipeater off to allow max power for PSK31).

PSAT’s radio and packet system are a simple $250 APRS tracker http://www.byonics.com/mtt4b sent to space. The PSK31 transponder is a single 3.4″ square circuit board made by Brno Universtiy in the Czech Republic. The CPU for controlling bulletins and timing is a simple Parallax Basic Stamp.

PSAT is actually only about a 1U cubesat but in a 1.5U package since the flight was available and it gave us more power for our NON-SPACE solar cells. We are using standard silicon that are only half as efficient as multi-junction cells, but only cost 1% as much.

PSAT has a single 21″ VHF  and 72″ long HF whip. It has two UHF 6″ orthogonal monopoles, all of very thin Nitinol wire.

More details will eventually follow as the page will be updated over the coming weeks http://aprs.org/psat.html

* PSAT packet telemetry is OK, Digipeater will be off (secondary mission)
* PSAT PSK31 transponder is ON with 28.120 MHz uplink! (primary mission)
* WOD data fixed.  Spin data now available.  Right now it is at 3 RPM with
+Z pointing 45 deg off Sun
* Launch TLE elements (below) are still very good
* http://PCSAT.APRS.ORG web page is now capturing PSAT telelmetry that
users inject into the APRS-IS
* BRICSAT telemetry has been heard but is cycling OFF due to low power
* BRICSAT PSK31 downlink (also FM) has also been heard barely (when ON)
* USS Langley not heard

Frequencies:

PSAT: 145.825 – 1200 baud AX.25 telemetry – digi off
PSAT PSK31-5: 435.350 FM down, 28.120 SSB PK31 uplink – Brno University Transponder

BRICsat: 437.975 – 9600 baud telemetry evry 20s
BRICsat PSK31-6 – same as PSAT but PSK TLM on 375 Hz (PSAT on 315 Hz)

USS Langley – 437.475  9600 baud telemetry  <== CORRECTION

ULTRASat3  
1 99993U          15140.67013889  .00040043  00000-0  10235-2 0 00009
2 99993 055.0004 339.9238 0251027 182.3314 074.3075 15.12517086000014

Bob, WB4APR

Guide to using the PSK31 transponder http://amsat-uk.org/beginners/how-to-work-psk31-satellites/

ParkinsonSAT (PSAT) http://www.aprs.org/psat.html

Fldigi PSK31 software http://www.w1hkj.com/Fldigi.html

Listen to satellite signals in the 145 and 435-438 MHz bands from anywhere in the world using the online SUWS WebSDR located near London. Further details at http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

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Nine CAS-3 amateur radio satellites to launch in July

CAMSAT CAS-3A

CAMSAT CAS-3A

The CAMSAT orchestrated CAS-3 amateur satellite system is now nearing completion.

Nine satellites, CAS-3A – CAS3i, should be launched in mid-July 2015 from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center on the new CZ-6 launcher. It is understood the CZ-6 will be carrying a total of 20 satellites.

Six of the CAMSAT satellites, CAS-3A-CAS-3F, are equipped with substantially the same amateur radio payloads. A 20 kHz bandwidth 435/145 MHz (mode U/V) linear transponder for SSB/CW communications, a CW telemetry beacon and an AX.25 19.2k/9.6k bps GMSK telemetry downlink.

Each set of amateur radio equipment has the same technical characteristics, but operates on different frequencies in the 435 MHz uplink band and 145 MHz downlink band. While the amateur payloads are similar the sizes of the satellites differ, one is 20 kg, three are 10 kg and two are 1 kg.

LilacSat-2, developed at the Harbin Institute of Technology, has been renamed as CAS-3H, and has had to change frequencies to avoid a clash with other CAMSAT satellites on the flight.

Two others satellites on the launch also carry amateur satellite service payloads and have been named as CAS-3G and CAS-3i.

Further information on the CAS-3A to CAS-3F satellites can be seen at
http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/communications/camsat-cas-3-series/

CAMSAT with support from the Qian Youth Space Academy has been developing two satellites CAS-2A1 and CAS-2A2. These will not be on this launch, instead they may fly on a CZ-2 at a later date.
http://amsat-uk.org/2012/10/18/cas-2a1-and-cas-2a2-linear-transponder-amateur-radio-satellites/

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PSK31 and APRS CubeSat Status Update

PSAT PSK31 FM Downlink received by Martin G8JNJ at 1429 UT May 22, 2015 using the online SUWS WebSDR

PSAT PSK31 FM downlink received by Martin G8JNJ at 1429 UT May 22, 2015 using the online SUWS WebSDR

Martin Ehrenfried G8JNJ reports receiving the PSAT PSK31 FM downlink on the online SUWS WebSDR located at Farnham near London.

Bob Bruninga WB4APR has posted two updates on May 21 and May 22 to the AMSAT Bulletin Board about the three USNA CubeSats PSAT, BRICSAT and USS Langley along with a guide on how to use the PSK31 transponder. These can be seen below.

Status Summary – Day 2 – May 21

We now have heard 4 of 5 transmitters from our 3 spacecraft all still in a close cluster:
* PSAT packet is OK but WOD not working (no digipeating for users yet)
* PSAT PSK31 downlink is ok [remember, it is FM!]
* BRICSAT telemetry has been heard but is cycling OFF due to low power
* BRICSAT PSK31 downlink (also FM) has also been heard barely (when ON)
* USS Langley not heard

28 MHz PSK31 Receiver Board Flight Prototype - Brno University of Technology

28 MHz PSK31 Receiver Board Flight Prototype – Brno University of Technology

PSAT CPU shows the 4 day-fail-safe backup reset circuit is not counting down, so we have lost this (1 of 3) fail safe backup RESET capabilities. Bad line of code already found.  But cannot change it.

PSAT is not properly reporting WOD data and S#… STATUS packets are being bundled until 255 byte packet length is reached and then it all comes down at once.  Noone has captured any of these long packets.  Please try with PASSALL ON so that you can receive partial packets.

Awaiting permission from Brno University of Technology to authorize HF user uplinks on PSAT PSK31. UPDATE May 22 Here is the announcement from Brno University: “We can uplink open to all users. Please, do it.”Mirek OK2AQ.

BRICSAT PSK31 transponder is on identical frequencies as PSAT’s.  You can tell them apart because one has PSK Telemetry on 315 Hz and the other is on 365 Hz.  Both on the UHF FM downlink 435.350 MHz

We’d LOVE to hear from USS Langley, and we’d love to capture one of those long WOD packets from PSAT.  Our ground station is only getting a few packets compared to some submissions from others.  Keep it up.

SUMMARY:

145.825 1.5U  CubeSat – PSAT 1200 baud AX.25
435.350 same CubeSat – PSAT PSK31 FM – Brno University transponder

437.975 1.5U  CubeSat – BRICsat 9600 baud
435.350 same CubeSat – BRICsat PSK31 FM – Brno University transponder

437.475 3.0U  CubeSat – USS Langley 9600 bd

ULTRASat3 
1 99993U          15140.67013889  .00040043  00000-0  10235-2 0 00009
2 99993 055.0004 339.9238 0251027 182.3314 074.3075 15.12517086000014

Bob, WB4APR

Status Summary – Day 3 – May 22

* PSAT packet telemetry is OK, Digipeater will be off (secondary mission)
* PSAT PSK31 transponder is ON with 28.120 MHz uplink! (primary mission)
* WOD data fixed.  Spin data now available.  Right now it is at 3 RPM with
+Z pointing at Sun
* Launch TLE elements (below) are 6 minutes ahead of satellite
* PCSAT.APRS.ORG web page is now also capturing PSAT telelmetry downlinks
* BRICSAT telemetry has been heard but is cycling OFF due to low power
* BRICSAT PSK31 downlink (also FM) has also been heard barely (when ON)
* USS Langley not heard

Only fault so far is the loss of the 4 day-fail-safe backup reset circuit
(1 of 3) fail safe backup RESET capabilities.  The lack of WOD data was
because we had a LOW-POWER bits set that was holding it off.

BRICSAT PSK31 transponder is on identical frequencies as PSAT’s.  You can
tell them apart because one has PSK Telemetry on 315 Hz and the other is
on 365 Hz.  Both on the UHF FM downlink 435.350 MHz

Bob, WB4APR

Receiving the PSAT PSK31 FM downlink

BRICsat 435.350 MHz FM PSK31 signal received by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW at 2057 UT on May 22, 2015

BRICsat 435.350 MHz FM PSK31 signal received by Tetsurou Satou JA0CAW at 2057 UT on May 22, 2015

Receiving the PSAT (and BRICsat) 435.350 MHz FM downlink is as simple as placing  your PSK31 laptop microphone next to the speaker on your FM satellite UHF receiver and just watching the waterfall.

What you see is exactly what everyone else sees (it’s FM).  There is no Doppler added to the tones due to your station’s position relative to the satellite.  But you DO have to retune your FM radio at least 3 times during the pass (+5 kHz, 0, -5 kHz) to stay in the FM passband. [Note: UK users should remember to selected the wide FM (5 kHz deviation) filter setting on their rigs]

User uplinks, however, will shift in the waterfall according to each user’s position relative to the satellite.  The shift can be as low as 1 Hz per second to as high as 6 Hz per second.  This is because the uplink is on 10 meters where the Doppler rate is only 1/15th of what it would be on UHF.

The TELEMETRY channel at 315 Hz (PSAT) or 375 Hz (BRICsat) is FIXED with no Doppler since it is generated onboard into the FM downlink

WHAT TO DO:

1) We will need PSK31 authors to open the PSK31 frequency tracking to accommodate more than 1 Hz per second Doppler tracking.  Current implementations can do 1 Hz/s but completely fail at 3 Hz/s.  2 Hz/s might work a little…

2) Until then, ANY uplink user that is in line with a direct overhead pass will have minimum Doppler at the start and end of his pass (1 Hz/sec) when the satellite is going right at him and directly away from him.  (Though it will be MAX (6 Hz/sec) when it passes over her/his station).

3) Just turn on MULTI CHANNEL window and let the PSK31 decode everyone.The ones with the least Doppler at any instant may be decoded for a while!

USERS can transmit later when BRNO University says it has completed its tests.  Brno provided the transponders for use in the PSAT and BRICsat satellites.

So start preparing your station to TX PSK31 on 10 meters SSB and to receive the audio from an FM UHF rig on 435.350 +/- 5 kHz steps of Doppler.

DOWNLINK Limitations:  The UHF downlink signal is only 300 mW and so a UHF beam is needed on the downlink.

UPLINK RESTRICTIONS:  *NOTHING MORE THAN* a Vertical 1/4 wave or Dipole is authorized on the 10m uplink  and no more than 25 Watts (for now).

Remember a 1/4 wave vertical is the ideal antenna because it maximizes the signal at lower angles and tapers the signal as the satellite gets closer. This keeps  user uplinks about the same during a pass.  Strong stations just drive down the AGC and ruin it for everyone.

Use minimum power!!  Remember, this is crossband FULL DUPLEX so  you can see yourself in the downlink just like everyone else can see you.  Act accordingly.  And of course DO NOT TRANSMIT if you cannot see the waterfall  … Duh!

Enjoy!
Bob, WB4APR

ParkinsonSAT (PSAT) http://www.aprs.org/psat.html

Fldigi PSK31 software http://www.w1hkj.com/Fldigi.html

Listen to satellite signals in the 145 and 435-438 MHz bands from anywhere in the world using the online SUWS WebSDR located near London. Further details at http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

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Beijing may launch amateur satellites in July

CAMSAT CAS-2 at Friedrichshafen Ham Radio 2012 Event

CAMSAT CAS-2 at Friedrichshafen Ham Radio 2012 Event

UPDATE May 24, 2015: CAS-2A1 and CAS-2A2 will not be launching in July but nine CAS-3 series satellites will be. See the latest information at http://amsat-uk.org/2015/05/24/nine-cas-3-ham-radio-satellites/

Mineo Wakita JE9PEL reports on his website that Beijing may launch satellites carrying amateur radio payloads in July 2015. It is understood the launch would be on a CZ-6 rocket from the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center.

XW-2 (CAS-2) and LilacSat-2 will be carrying amateur radio payloads but at the time of writing it is not clear if Tiantuo-3 and ZDPS-2 may also have amateur radio payloads.

Additionally it is reported elsewhere there may be up to 20 satellites on the launch.

Fan Shaomin BA1EO with CAS-2 A1

Fan Shaomin BA1EO with CAS-2 A1

CAS-2A1 satellite: 270x270x250mm
2m CW telemetry beacon 100 mW
2m AX.25 digital telemetry beacon 500 mW
2m FM voice beacon 500 mW
U/V mode Linear transponder 50 kHz 500 mW
L/S mode Linear transponder 200 kHz 320 mW
U/V mode APRS repeater

CAS-2A2 satellite:
70cm CW telemetry beacon 100 mW
70cm AX.25 digital telemetry beacon 500 mW
13cm CW telemetry beacon 200 mW
3cm CW telemetry beacon 200 mW
V/U mode Linear transponder 500 mW

LilacSat-2 – Harbin Institute of Technology
Approx. 11 kg 20x20x20 cm
Uplink: 145.825, 145.875 MHz
Downlink: 437.200 MHz beacon 437.225 MHz FM/APRS

Tiantuo-3 (TT-3) – Small satellite from China’s National University of Defense Technology

ZDPS-2 – Nano-satellite mission of the Microsat Research Center Zhejiang University

Source Mineo Wakita JE9PEL http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/lilacsat.htm

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Mass 434 MHz Balloon Launch Sunday

A typical High Altitude Balloon - Image Credit STRATODEAN

A typical High Altitude Balloon – Image Credit STRATODEAN

There are many 434 MHz balloon launches planned for Sunday, May 24 from Elsworth, Cambridge, wind and weather permitting.

The USB FSK signals from the balloons should be receivable across much of the British Isles.

Provisional frequencies so far are:
434.447 – “ECC1” (PITS) (NTX2B can be reprogrammed)
434.300 – “CHEAPO” (RFM22 can be reprogrammed)
434.395 – “SPARK” (Fixed frequency)
869.500 – “CS4”  (UKHASnet node with GPS)
434.250 – “HL1″ (XABEN tracker)
434.350 – “uX0″ (XABEN tracker)
434.550 – “uX2″ (XABEN tracker)

Some of the launches should be Live Streamed via http://LiveHAB.com/

The LARDY-PICO balloon will also launch from Primrose Hill, London transmitting 434.647 MHz USB RTTY 50bps 270Hz shift.

For the latest frequency updates and launch status check the UKHAS Google Group. Links for the group and real-time balloon tracking are at http://amsat-uk.org/beginners/balloons/

Listen to UK balloon radio signals on 434 MHz USB from anywhere in the world using the online SUWS WebSDR, further details at http://amsat-uk.org/2014/08/15/suws-websdr-moves-to-new-site/

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LightSail-1 and other CubeSats Launch with X-37B

LightSail-1 with sail deployed - Credit Justin Foley KI6EPH

LightSail-1 with sail deployed – Credit Justin Foley KI6EPH

At 1504 UT on Wednesday, May 20 the first of The Planetary Society’s two LightSail spacecraft blasted off into space aboard an Atlas V rocket with the X-37B space shuttle. Deployment of LightSail took place at 17:05:40.620 UT. The mission is a shakedown cruise designed to test out the CubeSat’s critical systems.

UltraSat Deployer Configuration - Credit United Launch Alliance

UltraSat Deployer Configuration – Credit United Launch Alliance

There were ten CubeSats including LightSail-1 in the UltraSat Deployer onboard the Atlas V. Information on these satellites is at http://www.spaceflight101.com/afspc-05-secondary-payloads.html

The Psat and BRICSat-P CubeSats carry amateur radio PSK31 transponders for multi-user PSK31 text messaging. Psat A/B also has APRS.

LightSail-1 has a 9600 bps FSK AX.25 Packet Radio downlink on 437.435 MHz. The Planetary Society’s Jason Davis asks radio amateurs to help by emailing him any data you collect from LightSail, including screenshots of the radio signal if you have them. He’ll pass the information on to the engineering team, and your contribution will be recognized on the blog. The contact address is at http://www.planetary.org/about/staff/jason-davis.html

Jason provides a timeline of the launch events at http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2015/20150518-lightsail-first-day-space.html For the latest updates follow him on Twitter @jasonrdavis

In 2016, the second LightSail spacecraft will piggyback into orbit aboard the first operational flight of SpaceX’s new Falcon Heavy rocket for a full-fledged solar sailing demonstration.

This video about the project features Bill Nye (the Science Guy on PBS TV) as well as Justin Foley KI6EPH, Alex Diaz KJ6KSF and Stephanie Wong.

Watch LightSail – Flight by Light (full version)

CubeSats in UltraSat Deployer - Image Credit NRO

CubeSats in UltraSat Deployer – Credit NRO

Gunter’s Space Page reports these spacecraft were onboard the Atlas V:
• X-37B OTV-4 (USA 261)
• GEARRSAT 2 (GEARRS 2)
• LightSail A
• OptiCube 1 (O/C 1)
• OptiCube 2 (O/C 2)
• OptiCube 3 (O/C 3)
• USS Langley
• AeroCube 8A (IMPACT A)
• AeroCube 8B (IMPACT B)
• BRICSat-P
• PSat A (ParkinsonSat A)
http://space.skyrocket.de/doc_chr/lau2015.htm

Frequencies courtesy JE9PEL
Satellite     Uplink          Downlink
LightSail-A      .            437.435 9600bps FSK                      KK6HIT-1
PSat-A/B       28.120 PSK31   435.350 FM PSK31  145.825 1200bps AFSK   PSAT-1 
USS Langley   145.825         437.475 9600bps FSK 
BRICsat        28.120 PSK31   435.350 FM PSK31  437.975 9600bps FSK

Further information on the CubeSats can be seen at http://www.spaceflight101.com/afspc-05-secondary-payloads.html

BRICsat and PSAT http://www.urel.feec.vutbr.cz/esl/

PSK31 and APRS CubeSats
http://www.arrl.org/news/view/us-naval-academy-cubesat-launch-to-include-next-aprs-satellite

The Register http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/05/19/us_air_force_x37b_space_plane/

LightSail – First Day in Space http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2015/20150518-lightsail-first-day-space.html

LightSail Mission Control Center http://sail.planetary.org/missioncontrol

LightSail – Flight by Light http://sail.planetary.org/

Links for satellite tracking software and Keps http://amsat-uk.org/beginners/satellite-tracking/

Radio Amateurs invited to test APRS on Duchifat-1

Duchifat-1 Mission PatchDuchifat-1, the Israeli high school students 1U CubeSat launched June 19, 2014, is ready for its first public tests. People with the ability to send Compressed APRS location packets are invited to join the tests.

The satellite will collect these packets worldwide along its flight at 620 km high orbit, and will downlink them from time to time over our ground station in Herzliya/Israel.

Participants are kindly requested to register in advance in order to get their packet identified on the map.

The packets successfully received will be displayed on a map in our Internet site and  QSL cards will be sent via Bureau to the stations registered and recognized. (unfortunately, there is no way we can recognize packets from unregistered stations because the packet is limited to 14 characters at the satellite, so we assign two unique characters to every registered station to enable us to identify them).

Registration can be done at http://www.h-space-lab.org/php/duchifat1-en.php

Also available in that site are operational information about the satellite, and the following documents:

*Configuring TT4 Explanation.doc* – how to use the Byonics TinyTrak4 for generating Compressed APRS packets

*Terms Of Use.doc* – terms and techniques for making the best use of the satellite

There is also Ground station software available for download, written by our students around ISIS space Demodulator software.

We hope many people will find it interesting and enjoyable,

Good luck!

73 from the Herzliya Science Center students and teachers

Dava Newman KB1HIK Begins Work as NASA’s Deputy Administrator

NASA Deputy Administrator Dr. Dava Newman KB1HIK walks to a meeting with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden formerly KE4IQB, on Monday, May 18, her first day on the job at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Credits: NASA/Bill Ingalls

NASA Deputy Administrator Dr. Dava Newman KB1HIK walks to a meeting with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden formerly KE4IQB, on Monday, May 18, her first day on the job at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Credits: NASA/Bill Ingalls

Dava Newman KB1HIK started her official duties as NASA’s new deputy administrator on Monday at the agency’s headquarters in Washington.

Newman was nominated in January by President Obama, confirmed by the Senate in April and sworn in on Friday, May 15. The deputy administrator position had been vacant since the departure of Lori Garver in September 2013.

“I have known and admired Dava for several decades,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (formerly KE4IQB). “Her talents and skills as an educator and technological innovator will bring a new energy to our NASA leadership team, and I’m ecstatic to have her on board.”

Along with Bolden, Newman is responsible to the agency administrator for providing overall leadership, planning, and policy direction for NASA. Newman will perform the duties and exercises the powers delegated by the administrator, assists the administrator in making final agency decisions, and acts for the administrator in his absence by performing all necessary functions to govern NASA operations and exercises the powers vested in the agency by law. Newman also is responsible for articulating the agency’s vision and representing NASA to the Executive Office of the President, Congress, heads of federal and other appropriate government agencies, international organizations, and external organizations and communities.

“I’m very excited to be at NASA,” said Newman. “I’m looking forward to being a part of the agency’s work to expand humanity’s reach into space, advance our journey to Mars and strengthen America’s leadership here at home.”

Prior to her tenure with NASA, Newman was the Apollo Program Professor of Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge. Her expertise is in multidisciplinary research that encompasses aerospace biomedical engineering.,

Newman’s research studies were carried out through space flight experiments, ground-based simulations, and mathematical modeling. Her latest research efforts included: advanced space suit design, dynamics and control of astronaut motion, mission analysis, and engineering systems design and policy analysis. She also had ongoing efforts in assistive technologies to augment human locomotion here on Earth.

Newman is the author of Interactive Aerospace Engineering and Design, an introductory engineering textbook published by McGraw-Hill, Inc. in 2002. She also has published more than 250 papers in journals and refereed conferences.

As a student at MIT, Newman earned her Ph.D. in aerospace biomedical engineering in 1992 and Master of Science degrees in aerospace engineering and technology and policy in 1989. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 1986.

Source NASA

Astro Pi and ISS Contacts at Southend Raspberry Jam May 30

Southend Raspberry Jam 6The free Southend Raspberry Jam #6 event on May 30 will feature International Space Station (ISS) amateur radio contacts. In late 2015 and 2016 UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI will be talking to UK schools direct from the ISS using ham radio.

Also featured will be the Astro Pi competition. Entrants and winners will discuss their entries, with a recap of the competition before doing the coding later on.

Successful Astro Pi entries will be sent into space in November 2015 with UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI who will run them on a Raspberry Pi computer on board the ISS.

Organised by the Southend-on-Sea Linux User Group (http://soslug.org) this Raspberry Pi event takes place on Saturday, May 30 from 10:00 to 17:00 BST at the Tickfield Centre, Tickfield Avenue, Southend-on-Sea, SS2 6LL.

Among the many activities are:
• Hackathon: Scratch GPIO Electronics
• Talk: How Raspberry Pi changed my life Programming, Robots, and a successful Kickstarter by the age of 14
• Workshop: Learn to program real Apps for your own Android phone using Blockly and App Inventor
• Talk: Life Box A fantastic project, with lots of pretty LEDs, which models population growth in an environment
• Hackathon: Learn to program Minecraft, AstroPi and other hardware
• Talk: Object Orientated Programming

Free tickets and further information are available from http://southendjam.co.uk/

Download a Southend Raspberry Jam leaflet here

Astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI issues challenge for UK students to “make that call”
http://amsat-uk.org/2015/03/20/tim-peake-uk-students/

Send your code into space with astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI
http://amsat-uk.org/2014/12/10/send-your-code-into-space/

Astro Pi: Your Code In Space http://astro-pi.org/