ARISS contact planned for Oasis Academy Brightstowe

In 2014 the UK PM spoke to Oasis Academy Brightstowe students - Image Credit Oasis Academy

In 2014 the UK PM spoke to Oasis Academy Brightstowe students – Image Credit Oasis Academy

Friday, February 19, 2016, at approximately 14:23 UT, an ARISS contact is planned for Oasis Academy Brightstowe, Bristol. UK astronaut Tim Peake will be using the call sign GB1SS  while the Academy will use GB1OAB.

The ISS signal will be audible over Western Europe on 145.800 MHz FM. The contact will be webcast on the ARISS Principia website

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

School presentation:

Oasis Academy Brightstowe is an independent Academy for 11 – 16 year olds, located in Shirehampton, North Bristol. We opened in September 2008 in the state-of-the-art buildings of the former Portway School. Our facilities here are second to none, with an on-site restaurant, great sports facilities and a well-stocked Library.

Oasis Academy Brightstowe was given £1.8million to develop a 21st century ICT capability, so students here have access to the very latest technology; including a fully equipped Library, access to Wi-Fi throughout the school, and a Virtual Learning Environment, designed to give students access to online learning provision.

Oasis Academy Brightstowe LogoThe Academy has one of the highest computer-per-student ratios of any school in the area (better than one between two students) and we encourage students to be competent with the use of computers and the internet in their lessons.

The new technology is embraced by both staff and students and forms a key part of lesson planning and delivery. Interactive whiteboards are a feature of every classroom and teachers can instantly turn any workspace into an ICT suite using one of our eight portable laptop trolleys.

Principia Mission Patch

Principia Mission Patch

Students will ask as many of the following questions as time allows.

1. Emily (12): From my research, I have found out that you are taking part in 265 experiments. Which one is the most important for us here on Earth?

2. Luke (15): In your opinion, will unmanned missions ever be equal to manned ones?

3. Francesca (16): In a microgravity environment, can dust, debris and liquids cause a danger, and if so how do you deal with it?

4. Seema (15): My aim is to be the first female Afghan astronaut. What would be the one most important piece of advice that you have for me?

5. Jack (11): Were you told what experiments you had to do, or did you get to choose?

6. Ashleigh (16): How many days supplies do you have on board should a resupply mission not would you potentially be able to live for, and how would you survive the longest?

7. Lewis (16): How did you build the confidence to go into space?

8. Natalie (16): Why should we continue to fund expensive space missions when we have more pressing problems on Earth?

9. Nazain (18): If the world’s leaders could see the earth from your current perspective, do you think there would be a better consensus to sort out the problems of the world?

10. Kerys (10): Did anything in your previous career or experiences, prepare you for space?

11. Jacob (9): Why did you want to become an astronaut?

12. Emily (12): When you push on the wall of the space station behind you to move forward, does the space station move backwards due to the principle of conservation of momentum?

13. Luke (15): What do you think of NASA’s planned one way Mars mission, and would you go if given the opportunity?

14. Francesca (16): Can you feel the ISS shake or wobble?

15. Seema (15): Being in a microgravity environment causes a decrease in muscle mass and bone density. Other than exercise, what measures are you taking to protect your health?

16. Jack (11): Considering that in space you are weightless and time has a different value, do you age at a different rate?

17. Kerys (10): Astronauts go through such lengthy and intensive training for their journeys. Was there anything that you were not prepared for?

18. Jacob (9): How are your experiments helping to save our Earth?

19. Natalie (16): What do you miss about being on earth?

20. Nazain (18): Other than the earth, can you tweet a picture of your favourite sight in space?

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crewmembers onboard the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology and learning.

73, Gaston Bertels, ON4WF
ARISS mentor

ARISS Principia site https://principia.ariss.org/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

ARISS-Principia-Common-Header

Join AMSAT-UK

AMSAT-UK_Bevelled_Logo

AMSAT-UK Logo

Founded in 1975 AMSAT-UK is a voluntary organisation that supports the design and building of equipment for amateur radio satellites.

AMSAT-UK initially produced a short bulletin called OSCAR News to give members advice on amateur satellite communications. Since those early days OSCAR News has grown in size and the print quality has improved beyond recognition. Today, OSCAR News is produced as a high-quality quarterly colour A4 magazine consisting of up to 40 pages of news, information and comment about amateur radio space communications.

The new lower-cost E-membership provides OSCAR News as a downloadable PDF file giving members the freedom to read it on their Tablets or Smartphones anytime, anyplace, anywhere.

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch Rev4 20100609

AMSAT-UK FUNcube Mission Patch

An additional advantage is that the PDF should be available for download up to 2 weeks before the paper copy is posted.

The Membership year lasts for 12 months starting on January 1 each year.

Take out an Electronic membership here http://shop.amsat.org.uk/

E-members can download their copies of OSCAR News from http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/on

A sample issue of OSCAR News can be downloaded here.

History of HamTV on the ISS

Samantha Cristoforetti IZ0UDF with ISS HamTV Transmitter

Samantha Cristoforetti IZ0UDF with ISS HamTV Transmitter

Thursday, February 11, 2016, at 18:09 UTC, an educational ARISS radio contact took place at the Royal Masonic School for Girls, Rickmansworth,, United Kingdom. The school contact was operated by Tim Peake KG5BVI in the frame of the Principia mission.

It was a historic event: the radio contact was enhanced with video! Tim Peake activated the Ham Video transmitter on board Columbus.

HamTV Antennas at ARISS Telebridge Station IK1SLD in Casale Monferrato, Italy

HamTV Antennas at ARISS Telebridge Station IK1SLD in Casale Monferrato, Italy

As far back as the year 2000, a proposal for an ATV system on the International Space Station was submitted to the ARISS  Project Selection and Use Committee by Graham Shirville, G3VZV.

November 2002, a request for amateur radio facilities on the then under construction Columbus module was submitted by Gaston Bertels, ON4WF to Jörg Feustel-Büechl, Director of Manned Spaceflight and Microgravity Directorate of the European Space Agency (ESA). The request was to install wideband amateur radio antennas on the nadir of Columbus, facing the earth. With such antennas, the on board amateur radio facilities could be extended to amateur TV.

In 2003 the request was examined in detail and finally accepted. ARISS would pay for the development, manufacturing and qualification of the antennas. ESA would support the installation cost.

ARISS-Europe started a funding campaign, all donations being published on the website.

In 2004 coaxial feed throughs were installed on the port cone of Columbus. This was needed for accessing the antennas with feedlines from inside the module.

In 2005, the Royal Belgian Amateur Radio Society (UBA) signed a contract with the Wroclaw University of Technology, Poland for the development and manufacturing of the antennas. Whereas initial plans were for UHF, L-band and S-band antennas, only L- and S-band antennas could be ordered by lack of funding. The cost of the project was 47,000 Euro.

One of the Columbus Module 2.4 / 1.2 GHz Antennas

One of the Columbus Module 2.4 / 1.2 GHz Antennas

Early 2006 the antennas were delivered to ESA. Meanwhile main Columbus contractor EADS and subcontractor Alenia Spazio had reviewed mechanical and thermal constraints. Wroclaw University proceeded to qualifications tests (cost 3.000 Euro) and the antennas failed.

In 2007 an additional contract was signed with the Wroclaw University for the development of modified antennas. This amounted to 36.000 Euro. These antennas were accepted and installed on Columbus, October 2007.

The cost of the antennas finally amounted to 86.000 Euro and was covered by a wordwide funding campaign.

ESA supported the total installation cost of the antennas, including feed throughs and coaxial cables.

After the successful launch of Columbus and its integration into the International Space Station complex, an ARISS-Europe working group started a study for the development of an amateur television transmitter on Columbus, using one of the the S-band antennas. A debate started between the supporters of analog television (ATV) and the proponents of digital television (DATV). The working group, which met monthly per teleconference, made progress, but was stuck by the lack of funding.

Front panel of the HamTV transmitter

Front panel of the HamTV transmitter

As time went by, the debate on ATV versus DATV evolved at the advantage of the latter, but no funding was in sight… Then, suddenly, supported by the enthusiasm of Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli IZ0JPA, who had performed many ARISS school contacts during his 2010-2011 expedition aboard the Space Station, at the initiative of AMSAT Italia, an Italian manufacturer, Kayser Italia, presented a project for an amateur radio DATV transmitter to ESA’s educational services. In 2012, this proposal was accepted and ESA signed a contract with Kayser Italia for the development and the manufacturing of a DATV transmitter on S-band. This transmitter, dubbed “Ham Video, was installed on Columbus and ESA transferred the custodianship of this equipment to ARISS.

It was a long way, spanning sixteen years, from the initial proposal to the first ever HamTV school contact. A new era opens for ground station operators, interested in receiving digital amateur television from the International Space Station. A technical challenge already met by a few ground stations in Europe, USA and Australia. Long life to HamTV and success to the pioneering ground stations, world wide!

73,

Gaston Bertels, ON4WF

Watch First HamTV ARISS contact as received direct on 2395 MHz by Colin Watts G4KLB in Bournemouth

HamTV on the ISS http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/hamtv-on-the-iss/

Radio ham on BBC Radio Norfolk

Tim Peake KG5BVI preparing for his spacewalk in January

Tim Peake KG5BVI preparing for his spacewalk in January

Steve Nichols G0KYA got some good publicity for amateur radio by letting his local media outlets know he had received a signal from Tim Peake on the ISS.

He was lucky enough to hear astronaut Tim Peake’s ISS contact with another UK school on Thursday, February 11, 2016. Not only did he record it, but he sent out a press release and ended up being interviewed about it by BBC Radio Norfolk on Friday.

Steve says: “If you do hear and record Tim do contact your local media as they are fascinated by the whole business and it brings good PR for amateur radio in general.”

Read Steve’s blog post and listen to a recording of his interview at
http://g0kya.blogspot.co.uk/2016/02/radio-norfolk-interview-about-tim-peake.html

January – Local newspaper reports reception of Tim Peake on ISS
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/01/13/local-paper-tim-peake-iss/

ARISS UK release full video of Tim Peake and RMS contact

This is the 77 minute video of the ARISS contact between Tim Peake GB1SS and the Royal Masonic School for Girls Rickmansworth GB1RMS.

The video starts with the students of Cadogan House, the prep school for girls aged 4 to 11 at the Royal Masonic School for Girls singing a number of songs that have been part of their study into space.

The video continues with the senior school presenting an overview of the activities that they have been involved in as part of their study and understanding of space. This section concludes with a panel of experts from the UK space industry fielding questions from the assembled audience.

At approximately 33 minutes, Ciaran Morgan M0XTD from ARISS, starts the ARISS programme with an introduction of the team, their roles and all the equipment that has been brought to the school to help facilitate the contact.

The actual ARISS contact starts at approximately 53 minutes into the video.

After the contact has finished, the school’s Head Girl concludes the evening with a short thank you speech and introduces the trainers who prepared some of the girls for the Foundation Amateur Radio License.

Watch the ARISS UK Tim Peake and RMS for Girls video

More history made at second amateur radio call
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/02/12/more-history-made-at-second-amateur-radio-call/

HamTV on the ISS http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/hamtv-on-the-iss/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

Southampton University students receive Tim Peake

Christian Jacobs 2E0ICL and other members of the Southampton University Wireless Society (SUWS) listened to the Tim Peake GB1SS amateur radio contact on February 11, 2016 with the Royal Masonic School for Girls GB1RMS.

The ISS downlink was on 145.800 MHz (+/- 3.75 kHz Doppler shift).

Watch SUWS receiving ARISS contact with the Royal Masonic School for Girls

Southampton University Wireless Society G3KMI
http://suws.org.uk/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/391638664206919/

More history made at second amateur radio call
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/02/12/more-history-made-at-second-amateur-radio-call/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

More history made at second amateur radio call

Royal Masonic School for Girls amateur radio contact with Tim Peake - Credit UKSA

Royal Masonic School for Girls amateur radio contact with Tim Peake – Credit UKSA

The second live amateur radio call to a British school with Tim Peake GB1SS took place Thursday, February 11, 2016 at the Royal Masonic School (RMS) for Girls GB1RMS in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire.

Young women from RMS for Girls who certified as Amateur Radio operators for the live link up -Credit RMS

Young women from RMS for Girls who certified as Amateur Radio operators for the live link up – Credit RMS

Contact was made with the International Space Station (ISS) at around 18:09 GMT and, in a world first at a school, video was streamed over the radio airwaves which meant that the students could see as well as hear Tim. The contact lasted around 8 minutes allowing several students to ask Tim about life on board the ISS.

Year 9 student Saira, asked

What the first word that came into his head was when he saw the Earth from space.

Tim’s response was simple, “beautiful.”

Isabella, aged 7, asked

When I am your age what do you think space travel will look like?

Tim said that Isabella had many years to wait until then but he hoped that trips to the Moon and to Mars would be possible.

Head of Education and Skills for the UK Space Agency, Jeremy Curtis said

The students at the Royal Masonic School did a fantastic and professional job during the contact itself – but more than that, the whole school has really engaged with Tim’s Principia mission by trying out the many education activities he has inspired.

John Gould G3WKL President of the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB) said

Tonight was a truly historic moment; not only for the school having their contact with Tim, but, for the first time ever a school received amateur television from the ISS. I hope this event gives all the students at the school, and everyone watching, a sense of inspiration in terms of STEM subjects which have been brought so vividly to light in a fun way through amateur radio.

Ciaran Morgan M0XTD from ARISS said

It was marvellous; we’re absolutely elated and extremely grateful to Tim for setting the camera up. It was far better than we could have expected and I hope that the students enjoyed it as much as we did.

The event was broadcast live via the ARISS UK website and will be made available shortly on their YouTube channel.

Sandringham School in St Albans, Hertfordshire were the first school to make a call to Tim and details of dates for all the other 8 shortlisted schools have now been scheduled.

For more information on ARISS calls and other activities linked to the Principia mission, please visit the events page
https://principia.org.uk/events/

Source: UK Space Agency press release
https://principia.org.uk/news/second-amateur-radio-call/

Read the Watford Observer report and watch the video at
http://m.watfordobserver.co.uk/news/14271561.VIDEO__Watch_history_be_made_as_school_becomes_the_first_in_the_world_to_make_video_contact_with_the_International_Space_Station_and_talk_to_Major_Tim_Peake/

BBC Three Counties Radio Tim Peake talks live from the ISS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPDBfilMXgs

Video of Tim Peake’s first Digital Amateur Television (DATV) HamTV ARISS contact as received direct on 2395 MHz by Colin Watts G4KLB in Bournemouth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9keVA21DPBc

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

ISS HamTV used for school contact

Tim Peake HamTV at Royal Masonic School for Girls - Credit Sian Cleaver

Tim Peake HamTV at Royal Masonic School for Girls – Credit Sian Cleaver

In a Tweet sent February 11 the UK Space Agency noted that the HamTV Digital Amateur Television (DATV) transmission by Tim Peake GB1SS from the ISS was a “World First”.

James Patterson M1DST and family listening to Tim Peake

James Patterson M1DST and family listening to Tim Peake

On Thursday, February 11, 2016, at approximately 18:09 UT, an ARISS contact took place between UK astronaut Tim Peake GB1SS and students at the Royal Masonic School for Girls GB1RSM in Rickmansworth, Herts.

The ARISS team of licensed UK Radio Amateurs achieved a world first by receiving live video from the ISS during the contact. Using the HamTV transmitter, which has recently been commissioned on board the ISS, Tim Peake was the first astronaut to use this equipment during a two way schools contact.

As well as building a vehicle based HamTV receive system, which was installed at the school on the day of the contact, the ARISS UK team also installed equipment at the Goonhilly Earth Station in Cornwall to receive the 2395 MHz HamTV transmissions from the ISS, this was then streamed via the web to the school.

On the Expert Panel at the historic contact were Libby Jackson of the UK Space Agency, Sian Cleaver of Airbus, Frances Wray of QinetiQ, Stephanie Fernandes Engineering Skills Policy Specialist at the IET, Matt Cosby of QinetiQ and Chris Bridges 2E0OBC of the Surrey Space Centre.

Radio amateurs across the British Isles and Europe were able to receive Tim Peake’s signal on 145.800 MHz FM. Among them was James Patterson M1DST who uploaded this video to YouTube.

Watch Listening To The ISS

The ARISS program is designed to maximise the impact of the Principia Mission outreach activities. It directly engages students with media and communication technologies with the goal of inspiring them to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

The contact took place on the United Nations International Day of Women and Girls in Science
http://www.unesco.org/new/en/unesco/events/prizes-and-celebrations/celebrations/international-days/int-day-of-women-and-girls-in-science/international-day-of-women-and-girls-in-science-2016/

UK Space Agency “World First” Tweet
https://twitter.com/spacegovuk/status/697847985212952576

Installation of the Goonhilly HamTV receiver
http://amsat-uk.org/2015/11/12/hamtv-on-the-iss-update/

HamTV on the ISS http://amsat-uk.org/satellites/hamtv-on-the-iss/

The questions asked by the students during the contact are at
http://amsat-uk.org/2016/02/07/ariss-rms-girls/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

Japanese Ham Radio Satellite Launch

ChubuSat-2

ChubuSat-2

The ChubuSat-2, ChubuSat-3 and Horyu-4  launch into a 575 km, 31 degree inclination orbit has been postponed.

Yasutaka Narusawa JR2XEA provides the following information on ChubuSat-2/3:

Nagoya University(NU) and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries(MHI) developed 50kg microsatellite ChubuSat-2(NU) and ChubuSat-3(MHI). These satellites have amateur VHF receiver and amateur UHF transmitter, and will be launched on Feb. 12 2016 (Note: Now Postponed) from Tanegashima, Japan. Komaki Amateur SATCOM Club operates these satellites from Komaki, Japan.

After the satellite separation, each satellite will transmit UHF CW beacon message including battery voltage etc. which is very important information for our initial and critical operation. So we are very happy if you receive the CW beacon message and report to us email: chubusat2@frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp

In following web site, we show the information(frequency, format, TLE, etc.) about ChubuSat-2 and ChubuSat-3. If we have your report, we will show your report in this page.
https://www.frontier.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/en/chubusat/chubusat_satellite2.html

Both satellite will provide the message exchange service. After the on-orbit checkout of the satellite(maybe one month after launch), you can use this service, sending your message with VHF uplink, then your message is written to the on-board memory. By sending inquiry message, anyone can read your message with UHF downlink.

ChubuSat-2 Satellite
Uplink:  145.815 MHz FSK  1200bps
Downlink: 437.100 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

ChubuSat-3 Satellite
Uplink:  145.840 MHz FSK  1200bps
Downlink: 437.425 MHz GMSK 9600bps and CW

The uplink/downlink format will be uploaded in above web site.

We hope you get interested in our satellites, receive beacon messages, and enjoy the message exchange service.

Best regards,

Yasutaka Narusawa (JR2XEA)

Horyu-4 downlink 437.375 MHz & 2400.300 MHz 1k2 AFSK,9k6 GMSK, S_BPSK, CW
http://kitsat.ele.kyutech.ac.jp/horyu4WEB/horyu4.html
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=434
https://www.facebook.com/Horyu-4-Arc-Event-Generator-and-Investigation-Satellite-780188535364868/

ARISS contact planned for girls’ school in UK

RMS students study for their Amateur Radio Foundation licence - Image Credit RMS

RMS students study for their Amateur Radio Foundation licence – Image Credit RMS

On Thursday, February 11, 2016, at approximately 18:09 UT, an ARISS contact is planned for the Royal Masonic School for Girls, Rickmansworth,, United Kingdom. The contact between Tim Peake GB1SS and GB1RMS will be receivable in the British Isles and Europe on 145.800 MHz FM and will be streamed live on the web.

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

UK astronaut Tim Peake KG5BVI / GB1SS

The Royal Masonic School for Girls is an independent girl’s day and boarding school in Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, with an exceptional, unusual and distinguished history. Founded in 1788 with the purpose of educating the daughters of Freemasons who were unable to support their families, it is one of the oldest girls’ schools in the country. The school attracts girls aged 4-18 from across Hertfordshire, Buckinghamshire and North London and boarders from all over the world. They also have a Pre School for boys and girls aged 2 to 4. The ethos is both aspirational and nurturing and the girls strive to be the very best they can be, academically, morally and creatively. The public examination results are consistently impressive and each year around 90% of girls leave RMS to take up places at University. Life at RMS is centred on much more than “just” academic success and the School is well known for its exceptional pastoral care, and the wealth of extra-curricular opportunities it offers – including Astronomy as they are one of very few schools in the UK to have their own planetarium and observatory!

This contact will be webcast on the ARISS Principia website.

Students will ask as many of the following questions as time allows.

1. Jana (Year 6): If you have hiccups in space do you bounce around?
2. Eva (Year 7): I watched your video on water and why it turned into a sphere. Would you get the same reaction with a fizzy drink like lemonade?
3. Isabella (Year 3): I’m 7 years old – when I am your age, what do you think space travel will look like?
4. Rosa and Millie (Year 9): We have heard you had to breathe o2 before your brilliant spacewalk.  Are there any precautions you had to take after returning inside the ISS?
5. Saira (Year 9): What was the first word that came into your head when you saw the Earth from Space?
6. Amelia (Year 8): What was the hardest thing to adjust to when you arrived at the ISS?
7. Elizabeth (Year 8): Which of your muscles has been affected the most by the zero gravity?
8. Jasmine (Year 8): Who was your biggest inspiration to travel into space?
9. Tallulah (Year 9): How is being an astronaut different from being an aquanaut, apart from the sea and the air?
10. Kitty (Year 9): What is the best advice that you have been given and wish to pass on to future astronauts before travelling to the ISS??
11. Yasmin (Year 9): Your blog says that you are doing research into new space age metals using a levitation furnace. Why is zero gravity better for this type of experiment?
12. Miranda (Year 8): Aside from plants, how do you produce oxygen on the ISS?
13. Tallulah (Year 10): What is the difference between flying a helicopter and being in a rocket going to the ISS?
14. Aaliya (Year 10): Did your training prepare you for the actual experience of space jet lag given you have said you adjusted so quickly?
15. Evie (Year 8): How is the ISS helping us deal with the challenges of deep space voyages?
16. Laura (Year 12): Is there an ‘up’ on the space station when conducting a spacewalk for navigational /orientating purposes?
17. Sophie (Year 3): What is your favourite experiment that you have carried out in space, and why?
18. Jane (Year 8): What has been the most surprising everyday object on the ISS that you did not expect to find?
19. Diana (Year 10): How often do you see Solar wind?
20. Evie (Year 8): When Chris Hadfield recently visited us he said your guitar skills were good but needed more practice Do you have time to practice the guitar in space?

ARISS offers an opportunity for students to experience the excitement of Amateur Radio by talking directly with crew members onboard the International Space Station. Teachers, parents and communities see, first hand, how Amateur Radio and crewmembers on ISS can energize youngsters’ interest in science, technology and learning.

Story Source: Gaston Bertels, ON4WF, ARISS mentor

ARISS Principia site https://principia.ariss.org/

Listen online to Tim Peake’s radio transmission on 145.800 MHz FM at http://websdr.suws.org.uk/

Listening to the ISS on a handheld radio http://amsat-uk.org/2016/01/10/listening-iss-on-handheld/

What is Amateur Radio? http://www.essexham.co.uk/what-is-amateur-radio

Find an amateur radio training course near you https://thersgb.org/services/coursefinder/

A free booklet is available aimed at introducing newcomers to the hobby that can also be used as a handy reference while getting started, see
http://rsgb.org/main/get-started-in-amateur-radio/alex-discovers-amateur-radio-2/

RSGB Board Member Steve Hartley G0FUW with some of the 80 students at the Royal Masonic School for Girls who participated in an Amateur Radio Electronics Buildathon

RSGB Board Member Steve Hartley G0FUW with some of the 80 students at the Royal Masonic School for Girls who participated in an Amateur Radio Electronics Buildathon