Threat to Amateur Radio 23cm band

Galileo LogoA joint paper by France, Lithuania, Malta, Slovenia and The Netherlands for the CEPT CPG meeting in Ankara, August 26-30, attacks the continued use by Radio Amateurs of our 1240-1300 MHz band.

This is the final CEPT CPG meeting in preparation for the ITU World Radiocommunication Conference 2019 (WRC-19) to be held in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, October 28 to November 22. This conference will define the Agenda Items for WRC-23.

Paper AI10 – Proposal on AS-RNSS says:

Galileo is close to full operational capability and its E6 signals in the band 1260-1300 MHz will support new services such as the free-to-use Galileo High Accuracy Service, and also robust authentication, expected to be used by a variety of applications including autonomous vehicles and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Several cases of interference to Galileo E6 receivers from amateur service emissions have occurred in the recent past, sometimes at significant distance, and have taken several hours or even days to be eliminated. There is therefore a serious concern that as Galileo E6 receivers are deployed and used more widely, cases of interference from amateur stations will rapidly grow in number.

A WRC-23 agenda item is necessary to address this issue because:

1. Unregulated use of the band 1240-1300 MHz by the amateur service is a serious source of harmful interference to RNSS receivers. This is demonstrated by experience.

2. The number of Galileo receivers in 1260-1300 MHz will increase dramatically, and interference cases will multiply if not addressed timely.

3. Galileo and other RNSS systems will deploy at global scale, and interference scenario between amateur emissions and RNSS receivers include cross-border cases. The issue is therefore of international nature and is to be addressed in the ITU framework.

4. Galileo is a major European asset, and a decision at WRC-23 is essential to be compatible with the roadmap of deployment of Galileo receivers in this band.

Download Paper: AI10 – Proposal on AS-RNSS from
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/client/meeting-documents/?flid=10031

Also see the IARU paper: RNSS Proposal WRC-19 AI 10 at the same URL

Some background information is at
https://amsat-uk.org/2019/05/31/1240-1300-mhz-band-discussed-by-cept-wgfm-and-cpg-pta/

European Commission Joint Research Centre report written 2014 and published 2015 on Compatibility between Amateur Radio Services and Galileo in the 1260-1300 MHz Radio Frequency Band. It reports the effect of transmissions of 0.1, 1 and 15 watts EIRP on a Galileo receiver up to 10 km away – download PDF here

January 2006 – Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations by Peter Blair G3LTF
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

SSA defends 23cm band against Galileo threat

Galileo LogoSweden’s national amateur radio society, the SSA, has sent a supplementary letter to the communications regulator PTS ahead of the next meeting of the CEPT ECC Conference Preparatory Group CPG-19.

The SSA report:

At a previous CEPT meeting (PTA), France has proposed an agenda item to WRC-23 that the coexistence between satellite navigation (eg Galileo) and amateur radio in the band 1240-1300 MHz should be investigated. The proposal was voted down at the preparatory PTA meeting, but France has now sent letters to the various telecommunications authorities with a request that they now support this proposal at the forthcoming CPG19-9. SSA opposes this.

SSA has therefore sent a supplementary letter to PTS about our 23 cm amateur band. Our section leader for IARU and VUSHF Mats SM6EAN explains the background and our opinion on our section pages. Here you can also read the new letter to PTS.

Hans-Christian SM6ZEM

Link to letter in Google English is available via https://tinyurl.com/SwedenSSA

The next meeting of the CEPT ECC Conference Preparatory Group CPG-19 takes place in Ankara, Turkey on August 26-30, 2019. The meeting documents should be available in advance at
https://cept.org/ecc/groups/ecc/cpg/client/meeting-documents/?flid=8819

1240-1300 MHz band discussed by CEPT WGFM and CPG/PTA
https://amsat-uk.org/2019/05/31/1240-1300-mhz-band-discussed-by-cept-wgfm-and-cpg-pta/

1240-1300 MHz IARU Region 1 paper PTA(19)069 – RNSS Proposal WRC-19 AI 10
http://rsgb.org/main/files/2019/06/PTA19069_IARU_AI-10_Amateur-GNSS_Final.pdf

January 2006 – Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations by Peter Blair G3LTF
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

Dramatic power reduction on 23cm for Belgium radio hams

A Galileo satellite - image credit ESA

A Galileo satellite – image credit ESA

The Belgium regulator BIPT has proposed cutting to just 20 watts the permitted power level for the Amateur and Amateur-Satellite allocations in 1260-1300 MHz which is to be used by the Galileo GNSS / GPS constellation.

A Google translation of the UBA post reads:

On December 18, the BIPT website provides BIPT consultation on the Frequencies, Power and Transmission modes that may be used by radio amateurs.

This consultation was already announced at the BIPT meeting with the recognized associations of September 28 and should provide a framework for the introduction of the CEPT Novice license in Belgium.

The most important part is the Appendix 1 which establishes the Frequency bands and technical characteristics allowed for the different categories of radio amateur licenses.

For holders of a HAREC license (class A operating certificate), there are only changes to the transmission power (usually in our favor):

• On most bands between 1.81 MHz and 440 MHz, the permitted power is 1500 W. Exceptions are 1.85-2.00 MHz (10 W), 5.3515-5.3665 MHz (15 W EIRP), 50-52 MHz (200 W), 69.95 MHz (10 W). EIRP), 70.1125-70.4125 MHz (50W) and 433.05-434.79 MHz (200W EIRP for (D-) ATV, 200W transmit power for other modes). On the bands above 1 GHz the permissible power is increased to 200 W, with the exception of 1260-1300 MHz (20 W). The special license for higher capital expires, but to perform exceptional experiments one can still submit a motivated request to temporarily use a larger capital. It is allowed to own devices that are capable of supplying a power up to twice the permitted maximum power.

The holders of the newly introduced CEPT Novice license (class B operating license) have access to almost all bands between 1.81 MHz and 440 MHz (except 5.3515-5.3665 MHz, 69.95 MHz and 70.1125-70.4125 MHz). The permitted transmission power is 100W at HF ​​and 6 meters and 50 W at 2 m and 70 cm. All classes of broadcast (modes) are allowed with the exception of D-ATV.
For the holders of a basic license (class C operating license) the changes are greater:

• The permissible transmission power is limited to 10 W, but the use of devices up to 100 W transmission power remains permitted (provided that the power is limited to 10 W). The use of external power amplifiers is not permitted.
• The use of the 17 m band (now 18.080-18.168 MHz), 12 m band (now 24.900-24.990 MHz) and 6 m band (now 50.125-52.000 MHz) is no longer allowed.
• The 20 m band is expanded (14,000-14,150 and 14,250-14,350 MHz), this is 65 kHz extra (14,080-140150 MHz).
• The 15 m band is expanded (21,000-21,150 and 21,320-21,450 MHz), this is 90 kHz extra (21,000-21,040 and 21,100-21,150 MHz).
• The 10 m band is expanded (28,000-29,700 MHz), this is 40 kHz extra (28,000-28,040 MHz).
• The permitted classes of broadcast (modes) do not change, everything modes except (D-) ATV remain allowed.

The full text of this consultation can be found on
https://www.ibpt.be/public/files/nl/22691/Raadpleging_RAM_2018-12-18.pdf

Everyone has the right to respond to the content of this consultation until January 18 and to propose changes.

The UBA will certainly do this and invites all members to send their comments and proposals for January 5 to ON7YD ( ( on7yd [at] uba [dot] be ) ). Anyone who wants to respond in their own name can find the procedure for this at
https://www.ibpt.be/nl/consumenten/radio/radioamateurs/raadpleging-op-verzoek-van-de-raad-van-het-bipt-met-betrekking-tot-het-ontwerp-van-besluit-van-de-raad-van-het-bipt-betreffende-de-frequenties-vermogens-en-transmissiemodi-die-mogen-worden-gebruikt-door-de-radioamateurs

UBA in Google English https://tinyurl.com/BelgiumUBA

2006 article Potential Interference To Galileo From 23cm Band Operations by Peter Blair G3LTF.
The Galileo constellation is expected to be fully operational by 2020.
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

Galileo GNSS/GPS – FCC to vote on use of signals in USA

FCC SealThe Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has said it will vote in November on whether to allow U.S. GPS receivers to access the Galileo global navigation satellite system (GNSS).

From an Amateur Radio perspective the key part is that the FCC will only be voting to waive its licensing requirements for non-federal operations with Galileo channels E1 and E5, subject to certain technical constraints.

This means they will not be voting on the E6 channel 1260-1300 MHz, these frequencies are also Amateur and Amateur-Satellite Service allocations. This suggests for 1260-1300 MHz the situation in the USA will be unchanged, the unlicensed use of the Galileo signal on channel E6 will not be permitted for non-Federal operations in the USA.

Read the Reuters story which also says Ajit Pai is proposing the first comprehensive review of the FCC’s orbital debris rules since their adoption in 2004
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fcc-gps-europe/fcc-to-vote-to-allow-u-s-devices-to-use-european-navigation-system-idUSKCN1MY2X6

2006 article – Galileo and amateur radio operations in 1260-1300 MHz
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

Galileo GPS closes down 23cm ATV Repeater DB0QI

AMSAT-UK Logo

AMSAT-UK Logo

The new Galileo GPS system that broadcasts across 1260-1300 MHz has resulted in the closure of a German ATV repeater.

The DARC report the Munich ATV repeater DB0QI has been closed down due to it jamming the Galileo Satnav Control Centre.

DB0QI was located 18 km from the Galileo GNSS receiver, another repeater that has been shut down is DB0ITV which was located 55 km from the receiver. It is believed both repeaters were running about 15 watts ERP.

DARC in Google English http://tinyurl.com/GermanyDARC

A 2006 Galileo GPS article by Peter Blair G3LTF highlighted the problems this system could cause, see
http://www.southgatearc.org/articles/galileo.htm

The Amateur Satellite Service has an important allocation at 1260-1270 MHz for Earth-to-Space (Uplink) communications. The Amateur Satellite Service has already seen its allocations at 2.4 and 5 GHz rendered unusable in urban areas due to WiFi and other licence exempt devices. The Amateur Satellite Service does not have any other global spectrum allocations in the key 915 MHz to 6 GHz region.

While the German announcement may relate to a single Galileo command station being used to test the initial satellites it clearly raises concerns about what will happen in a few years time when the full Galileo constellation is deployed and 1260-1300 MHz GPS units are in widespread use.

Satpack: Arduino satellite tracking and doppler tuning

The Satpack is an ATmega328 controlled satellite tracker with doppler tuning. To calculate the position of the satellite, they use qrpTracker, which is an Arduino friendly program based on James Miller’s Pan-13. Next, the Arduino tunes the radio to listen to the transmitted Morse code. Amazing! It’s open source, so check out the link for a lot more information on building your own Satpack.

Here’s a video of the Satpack code tracking a few satellites. Note that the tone of the cubesat drifts a bit. The keps were a bit old, but in a addition, I just got a letter from James Miller, the author of Plan 13 who recommends some constants that are more in keeping with the earth model used in today’s GPS engines.