IARU position on nanosatellites and picosatellites Resolution 757

IARU_LogoDuring a teleconference in mid-May, the IARU Administrative Council authorized the distribution of a paper which sets forth the IARU positions on the agenda items that will be considered during the World Radiocommunication Conference in 2015. The agenda items that impact amateur radio and amateur-satellite services including the IARU position on each of those agenda items have been published in the IARU E Newsletter for May 29, 2013.

Agenda Item 9.1.8 – Regulatory aspects for nanosatellites and picosatellites (Resolution 757 (WRC-12))

Resolution 757 calls for the results of studies of the procedures for notifying space networks that presently apply to nanosatellites and picosatellites to be reported to WRC-15. Because of the possible implications of these studies for the amateur and amateur-satellite services, the IARU is following the progress of these studies attentively. Nanosatellites and picosatellites that are properly licensed in the amateur-satellite service and are operated consistent with the purposes of the amateur and amateur-satellite services as defined in Nos. 1.56 and 1.57 may utilize the provisions of Resolution 642.

Nano and picosatellite (CubeSat) resolution at WRC-12

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Agenda Item 1.1 – “to consider additional spectrum allocations to the mobile service on a primary basis and identification of additional frequency bands for International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT) and related regulatory provisions, to facilitate the development of terrestrial mobile broadband applications, in accordance with Resolution 233 (WRC-12);”

IARU Position: The IARU recognizes that there is great pressure on the portion of the radio spectrum that is best suited for terrestrial mobile broadband applications. The amateur service allocations between 450 MHz and 6 GHz are all on a secondary basis to other existing services. The amateur-satellite service allocations in this frequency range are on either a secondary or a not-to-interfere basis.

The existing allocations to the amateur service in this frequency range are 902-928 MHz (in Region 2), 1240-1300 MHz, 2300-2450 MHz, 3300-3500 MHz (in Regions 2 and 3 along with 3400-3475 MHz in certain countries in Region 1), and 5650-5925 MHz (5650-5850 MHz in Regions 1 and 3).

The existing allocations to the amateur-satellite service in this frequency range are 1260-1270 MHz (Earth-to-space only), 2400-2450 MHz, 3400-3410 MHz (in Regions 2 and 3 only), 5650-5670 MHz (Earth-to-space only), and 5830-5850 MHz (space-to-Earth only).

The identification of 2300-2400 MHz for the possible implementation of IMT is already placing significant constraints on the use of this band by amateurs. The band 3400-3500 MHz is already identified for the possible implementation of IMT, subject to certain constraints, in a number of countries in Regions 1 and 3.

European Common Frequency Allocation Table Footnote EU17 provides:   “In the sub-bands 3400-3410 MHz, 5660-5670 MHz, 10.36-10.37 GHz, 10.45-10.46 GHz the amateur service operates on a secondary basis. In making assignments to other services, CEPT administrations are requested wherever possible to maintain these sub-bands in such a way as to facilitate the reception of amateur emissions with minimal power flux densities.”

As consideration is given to the identification of additional frequency bands for IMT, or for the extension of bands already so identified to additional countries or regions, care must be taken to maintain useful access to the radio spectrum at suitable intervals by the amateur and amateur-satellite services.

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Agenda Item 1.6.1 – “(to consider possible additional primary allocations) to the fixed-satellite service (Earth-to space and space-to-Earth) of 250 MHz in the range between 10 GHz and 17 GHz in Region 1;”

IARU Position: The band 10.0-10.5 GHz is allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis. It is a popular band for amateur experimentation, investigation of propagation phenomena, and point-to-point communication between networked repeater stations.

The band 10.45-10.5 GHz is allocated to the amateur-satellite service on a secondary basis. Owing to the popularity of the 10.0-10.5 GHz band for terrestrial amateur communication, increased use of this allocation for amateur satellite communication is anticipated.

European Common Frequency Allocation Table Footnote EU17 provides:   “In the sub-bands 3400-3410 MHz, 5660-5670 MHz, 10.36-10.37 GHz, 10.45-10.46 GHz the amateur service operates on a secondary basis. In making assignments to other services, CEPT administrations are requested wherever possible to maintain these sub-bands in such a way as to facilitate the reception of amateur emissions with minimal power flux densities.”

The IARU requests that existing and future use of this band be taken into account and continue to be provided for.

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Agenda Item 1.10 – “to consider spectrum requirements and possible additional spectrum allocations for the mobile-satellite service in the Earth-to-space and space-to-Earth directions, including the satellite component for broadband applications, including International Mobile Telecommunications (IMT), within the frequency range from 22 GHz to 26 GHz, in accordance with Resolution 234 (WRC-12);”

IARU Position: Above 440 MHz, the band 24.0-24.05 GHz is the lowest frequency primary allocation to the amateur and amateur-satellite services. The next lowest primary allocation is at 47.0-47.2 GHz. The 24.05-24.25 GHz band is allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis. While the designation of the 24.0-24.25 GHz band for ISM applications and the high water vapor absorption at this order of frequency create challenges, amateurs are actively pursuing experimentation in this band. Maintaining the primary allocation and assuring that any new services introduced into the band are compatible with the amateur and amateur-satellite services is essential for the continuing contribution by radio amateurs to the body of experience and knowledge of microwave equipment construction, operation, and propagation research.

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Agenda Item 1.12 – “to consider an extension of the current worldwide allocation to the Earth exploration-satellite (active) service in the frequency band 9 300 – 9 900 MHz by up to 600 MHz with the frequency bands 8 700 – 9 300 MHz and/or 9 900 – 10 500 MHz, in accordance with Resolution 652 (WRC-12);”

IARU Position: As noted under Agenda Item 1.6.1, the band 10.0-10.5 GHz is allocated to the amateur service on a secondary basis. It is a popular band for amateur experimentation, investigation of propagation phenomena, and point-to-point communication between networked repeater stations.

The band 10.45-10.5 GHz is allocated to the amateur-satellite service on a secondary basis. Owing to the popularity of the 10.0-10.5 GHz band for terrestrial amateur communication, increased use of this allocation for amateur satellite communication is anticipated.

The IARU requests that existing and future use of this band be taken into account and continue to be provided for. An illustration of how this can be accomplished is found in Recommendation ITU-R RS.1260-1; see No. 5.279A which applies to the use of the band 432-438 MHz by the Earth exploration-satellite service (active).

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Agenda Item 1.18 – “to consider a primary allocation to the radiolocation service for automotive applications in the 77.5 – 78.0 GHz frequency band in accordance with Resolution 654 (WRC-12);” and

IARU Position: Currently the only primary incumbent services in the band 77.5-78.0 GHz are the amateur and amateur-satellite services. These services also have secondary allocations in the adjacent bands of 76.0-77.5 GHz and 78.0-81.5 GHz. Amateur experimentation in the band is ongoing.

When allocations to services between 71 GHz and 84 GHz were made for the first time at WARC-79, the amateur and amateur-satellite services received a primary and exclusive allocation of 75.5-76.0 GHz and a secondary allocation of 76.0-81.0 GHz. The allocation of 75.5-76.0 GHz was withdrawn at WRC-2000 and as compensation the band 77.5-78.0 GHz was upgraded to primary and No. 5.561A was added, creating a new secondary allocation to the amateur services at 81.0-81.5 GHz.

The IARU acknowledges that there are significant benefits to be gained from worldwide standards for technologies such as automotive radars. However, automotive radars are classic examples of short- range devices (SRDs) for which, in general, allocations are neither essential nor appropriate.

Should a primary allocation to the radiolocation service for automotive applications nonetheless be added to the 77.5 – 78.0 GHz frequency band, the IARU earnestly requests that the primary allocation to the amateur and amateur-satellite services be maintained; or, in the alternative, that a suitable replacement allocation be provided on a primary basis within the band 71 – 84 GHz.

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The IARU say all IARU member-societies are encouraged to meet with their telecommunication authorities to discuss the WRC-15 Agenda Items and to gain support from their telecom authorities for the IARU positions.

Read IARU E Newsletter May 29, 2013

Nano and picosatellite (CubeSat) resolution at WRC-12
https://amsat-uk.org/2012/02/21/nano-and-picosatellite-resolution-at-wrc-12/