OSSI CubeSat in New Scientist Magazine



Hojun Song DS1SBO and the NovaNano FlyMate™ deployer

Hojun Song DS1SBO and the NovaNano FlyMate™ deployer

New Scientist magazine has an article about Hojun Song DS1SBO and his Open Source Satellite Initiative OSSI-1 CubeSat.

OSSI-1 is planned to launch in the 2nd quarter of 2013 into a 575 km 63° inclination orbit on a Soyuz-2-1b rocket from the Baikonur launch facility in Kazakhstan along with the Bion-M1, SOMP, BEESAT 2, BEESAT 3 and Dove-2 satellites. The Soyuz-2-1b launch had originally been planned for August 2012 but was delayed.

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OSSI CubeSat talk at Media Evolution Conference

Hojun Song DS1SBO at Media Evolution Conference – Image Credit Tricia Wang

Korean artist Hojun Song DS1SBO has traveled to Malmö in Sweden to give a presentation about his innovative amateur radio CubeSat OSSI-1 to the Media Evolution Conference taking place August 22-23.

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Astronaut Tim Peake invites students to apply for space class of 2013

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut of British nationality Tim Peake is encouraging school children to get fit and stay active at the Farnborough International Airshow this week. Budding young astronauts aged 8 to 13 from across the UK are invited to take part in the international challenge Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut – a programme to encourage school students to focus more on fitness and nutrition.

Tim Peake.

The programme developed by the partners of the International Space Station (ISS) uses astronaut training to teach how good diet and exercise play an important role in human performance in space and on the Earth. The programme is free and the activities can be used by individuals, schools or community groups. The international challenge will start in January 2013.

Mission X logoTim Peake is taking a short break from his own astronaut training to attend the Airshow and invite schools to participate in the Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut 2013 challenge. At Farnborough Airshow Tim spoke to teachers, students and families about his own astronaut training and challenged them to take part in the astronaut fitness programmes available as part of Mission X.

Tim as well as being a test pilot and ESA astronaut is also a keen runner, skier and scuba diver.
4000 UK students from over 44 British schools have already taken part in the Mission X challenges in 2011 and 2012. Students had the opportunity to take part in live link-ups with the International Space Station and find out about life in space. As well as Tim Peake, Mission X UK has been supported by ESA astronauts Andr Kuipers and Paolo Nespoli, NASA astronaut Piers Sellers and private astronaut Richard Garriott.
Jeremy Curtis, Head of Education at the UK Space Agency noted:

The UK Space Agency is enabling children to access astronaut training and nutrition regimes and learn about the science behind them

“This is a unique opportunity to find out first hand about astronaut training and to find out how you can get involved in Mission X – Train Like An Astronaut. The UK Space Agency is enabling children to access astronaut training and nutrition regimes and learn about the science behind them. The children taking part will also learn about space and could be the space explorers of the future.”

Tim Peake commented:
Spaceflight can be physically demanding and part of my job is to train hard so that I‘m always ready to go into space

“Being fit and healthy is a key requirement for future astronauts. Spaceflight can be physically demanding and part of my job is to train hard so that I‘m always ready to go into space. It’s much easier to exercise on earth than in microgravity! The real mission is to encourage kids today to exercise and eat a healthy diet, and astronaut training exercises are an exciting, fun way to do it.”

People have been flocking from around the world to visit the UK Space Agency in the Space Zone at Farnborough. The latest industry developments and cutting edge technology are on display to demonstrate the work being done to layout the future direction for space. Space is a growing industry with a bright future. One of the ways the Agency nourishes and supports it is by inspiring the next generation of space scientists, engineers and enthusiasts.

The next Mission X challenge will be launching in January 2013 – with the expectation of doubling the intake from 4000 to 8000 students across the UK. To find out more about how your children or school can be involved, register your interest.

Encouraging Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

First US Woman Astronuat Sally Ride on STS-7 - Image Credit NASA

The Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars  (WISH) project is sponsoring two six-day summer camps for rising high school seniors that should feature a presentation by astronaut Shannon Walker KD5DXB and an Amateur Radio contact with the International Space Station (ISS).

Eighty-four female high school students from 29 states will plan a simulated mission to Mars and experience life as an engineer or scientist when NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston hosts two events focused on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in June and July.

Shannon Walker KD5DXB - Image Credit NASA

The young women will work in teams with female NASA mentors to develop mission plans for launching to Mars, living and working there, and integrating the many components necessary for a successful planetary mission. They will work within the confines of a fictitious budget and build several small mockups of vehicles to demonstrate a successful launch and landing of the Mars spacecraft.

“WISH gives some of our brightest future innovators a chance to experience some of the exciting challenges that NASA engineers and scientists face on a daily basis,” said Johnson Deputy Director and four-time space shuttle astronaut Ellen Ochoa KB5TZZ. “It shows the young women that there are a variety of opportunities for them in technical fields.”

Young women participating June 24-29 will hear a first-hand account of life in space from NASA astronaut and radio amateur Shannon Walker KD5DXB. Participants July 8-13 will have a chance to speak with a current space station astronaut via ham radio as part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station program, a NASA educational initiative that facilitates direct links between students and astronauts.

The young women were selected based on completion of interactive, online lessons focused on space exploration and mapped to national education standards, academic merits and geographic diversity. The WISH program encourages young women to pursue science, technology, engineering and mathematics degrees and exposes them to the real-world applications of STEM careers at NASA. This program is in its second year. It began as a NASA accompaniment to the White House Council on Women and Girls.

For more information about WISH and a list of student participants, visit:

WISH: Women in STEM High School Aerospace Scholars http://www.wish.aerospacescholars.org/

Source NASA http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2012/jun/HQ_12-209_WISH.html

Amateur Radio on the International Space Station ARISS http://ariss.rac.ca/