Tancredo-1 TubeSat Video

Ubatubasat TeamPaulo PV8DX has released a video describing the new TubeSat Tancredo-1 and showing reception of the 437.200 MHz downlink by Drew KO4MA.

Tancredo-1, mounted in a TuPOD Deployer, was ejected from the International Space Station on January 16, 2017. The satellite is a STEM project built by middle school students at Escola Municipal Tancredo Neves school in Ubatuba, in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The video is in Portuguese but try enabling the YouTube Closed Caption subtitles and use the Auto-translator to get English.

Watch TubeSat TANCREDO 1 – By PV8DX

Links and further information on the Tancredo-1 TubeSat
https://amsat-uk.org/2016/12/02/school-tancredo-1-tubesat/

Six CubeSats Deploy from ISS
https://amsat-uk.org/2017/01/14/six-cubesats-to-deploy-from-iss/

Middle School Students’ Tancredo-1 TubeSat Scheduled for Launch

Ubatubasat Team

Ubatubasat Team

The Tancredo-1 satellite, a small TubeSat built by middle school students in Brazil, is scheduled to be sent to the International Space Station on December 9, 2016. The satellite will be sent to the ISS inside the TuPOD TubeSat deployer onboard JAXA’s KOUNOTORI6 cargo ship (HTV-6 mission). The TuPOD is expected to be ejected into space by the J-SSOD satellite deployer on December 19th and on December 21st, Tancredo-1 is expected to be finally ejected from the TuPOD into space. Once in space, Tancredo-1 will start transmitting telemetry data.

Tancredo-1

Tancredo-1

Tancredo-1 is the first satellite of the Ubatubasat project, a STEM project idealized by Prof. Cândido Oswaldo de Moura at Escola Municipal Tancredo Neves public school in Ubatuba, state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The project is supported by the Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE) and the Brazilian Space Agency (AEB). Tancredo-1 will initially have the same orbit as the ISS, but it will slowly drift with time and will eventually reenter in the atmosphere and burn.

The Ubatubasat project team and AMSAT-BR would like to kindly request radio amateurs around the planet to monitor and report any signals heard from Tancredo-1. Please send any reports (audio, AX.25 KISS files, etc) to py2sdr@gmail.com

Tancredo-1 will transmit on 437.200 MHz using 1200 bps AFSK AX.25.

Telemetry format and equations: https://goo.gl/qOK6qM

For more information see:
http://www.ubatubasat.com/en/
http://www.amsatuk.me.uk/iaru/finished_detail.php?serialnum=419
http://amsat-br.org/

73, Edson PY2SDR
AMSAT-BR

Information on other ISS CubeSats http://spaceflight101.com/htv-6/htv-6-cargo-overview/

TuPOD to enable ISS TubeSat deployment in 2015

TubeSat - Image Credit Interorbital Systems

TubeSat in space – Image credit Interorbital Systems

The TuPOD 3U mission will allow the in-orbit deployment of the first TubeSats – Tancredo 1, from Brazil and Ulises 1, from Mexico.

Both satellites are educational satellites and involve young students in the projects. TuPOD will integrate the two satellites inside a 3U CubeSat Structure designed to allow the coupling between TubeSat and the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD) launch mechanism.

The TuPOD will release the two satellites after 2 days, in accordance with NASA safety requirements. After the TubeSat deployment, the TuPOD will start is own mission receiving and sending data to amateur radio ground stations.

The TuPOD electronics have been designed by students at Morehead State University and is an updated version of $50SAT PocketQube electronics and Telemetry, Tracking & Command (TT&C) system.

Proposing a 1k2 GMSK UHF downlink and now expected to be deployed fom the ISS in spring 2015.

Tancredo 1 http://www.frequency.com/video/pres-tancredo-de-almeida-neves/176861394

Ulises 1 in Google English http://tinyurl.com/Ulises-1-TubeSat

IARU Satellite Frequency Coordination Panel http://www.amsat.org.uk/iaru

Interorbital Systems CEO Randa Relich Milliron on The Space Show

Randa Relich Milliron CEO Interorbital Systems

Randa Relich Milliron CEO Interorbital Systems

In this edition of The Space Show Randa Relich Milliron CEO of Interorbital Systems talks about the latest developments at the company which is developing a low-cost satellite launch capability using the Neptune rocket. She indicated the first launches will be sub-orbital.

A number of amateur radio CubeSats and TubeSats are planning to be launched by Interorbital. A launch manifest can be seen at http://www.interorbital.com/Launch%20Manifest%20Page%20_1.htm

Wes Faler also appears on the show. He has been building an Ion powered TubeSat for an Interorbital launch. Wes plans to use a closed cell foam filled with pressurized nitrogen, vaporizing the supporting plastic and releasing the enclosed nitrogen using a spark system similar to that used by Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPTs).  PPTs create an arc across the face of a solid Teflon bar, turning a few micrograms of Teflon into plasma.  The plasma moves along the PPT’s cathode and anode by Lorentz forces, much the same way that a rail gun accelerates its conducting projectile.

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Video of Interorbital Systems’ Neptune Rocket Test Firing

MOJAVE-10.28.2012—On a calm clear high-desert October evening, Interorbital Systems’ NEPTUNE rocket series’ main engine roared to life in its first hot-firing test. The engine, the IOS GPRE 7.5KNTA (General Purpose Rocket Engine; 7,500lb-thrust; Nitric Acid; Turpentine; Ablative cooling), blasted a 22-foot (6.71-meter) plume of fire across Interorbital’s Mojave Spaceport test area, scorching the sand an additional 50 feet (15.24 meters) beyond the plume end.

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Video of Interorbital Systems' Neptune Rocket Test Firing

MOJAVE-10.28.2012—On a calm clear high-desert October evening, Interorbital Systems’ NEPTUNE rocket series’ main engine roared to life in its first hot-firing test. The engine, the IOS GPRE 7.5KNTA (General Purpose Rocket Engine; 7,500lb-thrust; Nitric Acid; Turpentine; Ablative cooling), blasted a 22-foot (6.71-meter) plume of fire across Interorbital’s Mojave Spaceport test area, scorching the sand an additional 50 feet (15.24 meters) beyond the plume end.

Continue reading